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How to add back subcutaneous fat

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by finsit, Sep 24, 2021.

  1. finsit

    finsit Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi guys, has anyone any idea or point me to some good video/study that shows how can I add back some subcutaneous fats without hurting my waistline or visceral fats? I have lost quite a bit of weight (mostly fats) in the previous months and even though my stats look great, to most of people I look ill :( (you know the family stuff).

    I have increased my carbs threshold (from 20-50). I think I may need to add more fats to increase calories as a way to go forward? What do you brilliant people suggest?

    Thanks...
     
  2. jonathan183

    jonathan183 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think Dr Bernstein suggests adding protein for increasing weight for diabetics.
     
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  3. rpchebden

    rpchebden · Member

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    I wondered about this. I've not seen it addressed directly. Fat cells grow when insulin higher than glucagon. Fructose and cortisol direct fat viscerally; so maybe more protein would be the most sensible thing to try, it might need to be a lot though.
    I'd rather not capitulate to what others think about the way one looks though, try and be comfortable with less fat? Maybe more lean muscle as a compromise?
     
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  4. Member496333

    Member496333 · Guest

    I think men will always have a tendency to add fat to the central area. For women it seems to be the hips and upper arms that go first. Hopefully the breasts somewhere in between. But generally speaking, any fat made from glucose - so carbohydrate and to a lesser extent excess protein - will be stored centrally just because it’s made in the liver. Subcutaneous fat is more likely to come about from eating dietary fat. Nuts being a hugely energy dense example.

    Oversimplification I am sure, but I believe it’s a rule of thumb. My understanding is there’s a greater likelihood of fat being evenly distributed if it comes in as fat rather than being made into fat. Fructose and alcohol are prominent drivers of central obesity so it’s sensible to limit or eliminate those if you tend to carry a bit of a paunch and want to buff up the old abs a bit :shifty:
     
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  5. Fenn

    Fenn Type 1.5 · Well-Known Member

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    Everyone said I looked like I had cancer after six months of weight loss, but you kind of fill back into your skin and will look normal again, personally I would not be intentionally trying to add fat but wish you luck.
     
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  6. MrsA2

    MrsA2 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I try to be more concerned about what my meter says than what my family says.
    Often people are just envious that they don't have the same weight loss
     
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  7. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I would look at the BMI tables before you decide if you are too thin.
    As regards family and friends they tend to just notice change rather than be objective. I had a full beard for years, I shaved of the chin part and people said "Oh you have grown a moustache!"
     
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  8. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I think just as you can't spot fat reduce, you cannot dictate where fat is going to go. It may be a cultural thing similar to my Jamaican Mum, who thinks I am too skinny (I did go a little too far in reality). Maybe relax into your management, which for me meant allowing my mass to settle where it wanted to go, not stressing and keeping protein high.
     
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  9. Oldvatr

    Oldvatr Type 2 · Expert

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    As I understand things, if you are doing an LC diet and cutting out the carbs, then the energy they used to supply has to be replaced. If not then our body scavenges protein from our body, rather than fat which it tends to keep as protection and as a long-term anti starvation measure. Fat already stored is b****y difficult to shift it seems. I think that taking energy from lipids is more energy-efficient than digging it out of the adipose tissue, and protein gives up without much of a fight so it is an easier target. To back this up, we burn adipose fat when we shiver from the cold, and this heat comes from the energy being used to burn the fat.

    To supply the energy deficit we are advised to increase fat intake so as to stop the scavenging. But upping the protein also seems to work too, but there (I believe) is a limit to how much one can push the protein without harming the kidneys. Some voices dispute that last statement and give the carnivore diet as a working example of such a limit being bunkum. However, the carnivore version of the LC diet is still in its infancy, and the jury is still out on this.
     
  10. Member496333

    Member496333 · Guest

    In addition to this people have become used to everyone filling out so they think slim people are dying. Rotund has become the new regular and the “middle aged spread” is seen as normal. Go watch a a TV show from the 1960s or 1970s and almost everyone of all ages look like stick people in comparison with today’s bloaters.
     
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  11. Member496333

    Member496333 · Guest

    There’s also keto-carnivore which of course is the same thing but with a more fat leaning bias. I’m carnivore but simultaneously a major fat hunter. I seek out the fattiest cuts of meat and use more egg yolks than whites, for example. In the end I don’t think a healthy person eating carnivore has to think much about anything more than just eating the whole animal. From an evolutionary perspective it’s entirely logical, especially if your lineage is northern European where there would have been little else to eat for much of the year in preagricultural times.
     
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  12. finsit

    finsit Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well noted all the suggestions and they go inline with my research and the literature too, that is, adding more protein and fats. I am in no-way going to add carbs back as still my BG and a1c sits on top of the list even if i look like a dead-ghost !

    My second quarter April-June this year, i was enjoying all kind of sat fat including high fat dairy like clotted cream, cheese cream etc and i love em. However, my lipids test in June went from 3.5 to 9.6 and alarmed the whole NHS. I personally am not highly concerned about it as i am a member of LMHR group as well, but this sudden shift doesn't seem to be very right as well. Upon digging further, it seems the dairy fat is the culprit. I don't mind my LDL in 6's even though for NHS its still high but i will be happy at less than 7 where i can eat dairy fat. I reduced about 50% of my saturated fats in the last quarter and i had my blood test today and keeping fingers crossed. I will update here once i get the results.

    So, I am thinking of adding more monosat fats to increase a bit of caloric intake for 3 months and see if I can improve a bit of my ill-look without affecting my weight or the BG. I guess one of the reason of me looking ill is that i put myself under strenuous physical activity, which i was not used to before. However, i am loving it and that's not going to go away. At the start of April when gyms opened i could run 1.6 mile (VO2 Max test) in 18 minutes with difficulty. 5 months on and now i can comfortably do it in 14 minutes which puts me in a "good" state. Though my target is 12 minutes, which i am working on, so i think the looks have to stay ill for some more time :)
     
    #12 finsit, Sep 24, 2021 at 11:18 PM
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2021
  13. finsit

    finsit Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Regarding carnivore, as much as i love meat, i still don't believe being 100% carnivore is a healthy way of living in the long-run. I guess as Dr. B. says one should take 30 gms of carbs from green vegetables as they contain phytochemicals and I would also argue that even in a paleo setting there would be green vegetations or some berries in summer? Eating less, eating less frequent and eating variety of low-carb and any fat that comes with protein is the way of eating i am trying to stick to atm and it seems to be working well for me. Bigger meal quantities (even if its green veggies) still will do the "Chinese restaurant affect" and release incretin hormone by expanding the intestine and will raise your sugar regardless of the carb affect. So small portions has a great affect on my BGs.
     
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