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I still use Syringes

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by Delta57, Oct 9, 2019.

  1. Delta57

    Delta57 Type 1 · Newbie

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    I recall the time pens came out for Diabetics Type 1. I stopped them after a week or so and started using my syringes. I found that the pen was not giving me the required dose of insulin. It occurred quite a few times and my GP said, maybe it's just a poor batch of pens. That set alarm bells ringing for me. At least with syringes, you know exactly what you are getting Now, I see there are Pumps for insulin, I will not venture down that particular road either as I quite honestly don't trust the regime of administering insulin in this way. I have used insulin syringes for 31 years now and without any issues. Oh, and guess what, I haven't cried once whilst taking my jabs.
     
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  2. mike@work

    mike@work Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Also use 'em - small and handy...
     
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  3. Kim Possible

    Kim Possible Type 1 · Expert

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    I use syringes as a small, easy to carry, backup for my pump.

    However, I would not trust syringes to deliver 0.05 units as accurately as my pump does.
    I cannot comment of the accuracy of pens when they were first introduced but for 12 years, I found my reusable pens (as opposed to the single use less robust version) to be great.

    It is wonderful when you find something that works for you. New technology provides additional features which may or may not be useful. For example, I find the variable basal rates from a pump to be fantastic for me. The ability to turn off my basal when exercising or inch up basal rates each hour until I find the "sweet spot" when I need more if I am ill has revolutionised my diabetes management.

    And I have never cried when taking my jab or inserting my pump cannula.
     
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  4. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Whatever works for you :)

    I love the tiny doses my pump gives, as I almost never give doses in whole or even half units. Judging by the effect, it’s accurate at those tiny amounts.
     
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  5. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Whichever way works for you personally is always going to be best.
    I was sceptical when it was suggested I swap to pens from syringes.
    Never had any problems and looking back it was a leap forward.
    As for accuracy and not delivering insulin amounts. If ever I’ve suspected the pens are not working properly then I just do the standard dose accuracy check. It’s quick, easy and let’s you know if the dialled in amount is being delivered.
     
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  6. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    I've only ever been on pens, but nothing wrong with syringes if that suits you better!
     
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  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi @Delta57 ,

    A looooong belated welcome to forum. What took you so long to post your "first one..."

    Looking at yer profile. Shared interests. "Music" sound engineering & what not..
    I also notice you use lantus as a basal. So do I..

    There still is an "animal" inside me that wants the retro days of syringes from time to time (43 years with T1.) & loved the ritual of "pulling up."

    But "Lantus" can have a bad batch from time to time. It simply just goes off or less potent about half way to two thirds down the cartridge?
    In short; I personally wouldn't lay the blame at the doorstep of the device used to administer the drug.

    Now you made me want to source a U100 syringe. :) But not the glass veriaty.

    Edited to add. The newer pens are far more robust & personalised to taste than the earlier versions.

    Also, I noticed you have posted in the pump sub fora. You may get better resposes from a wider demographic if the topic was moved to the general T1 section? A current acting moderator will happily action this for you.
     
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    #7 Jaylee, Oct 9, 2019 at 9:51 PM
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
  8. Delta57

    Delta57 Type 1 · Newbie

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    My reason's for my absence for such a long time in doing anything here is because i had other issues. My partner has progressive MS, she is 52. Over the past two or so years, she has lost the ability to walk and even having a conversation is becoming difficult for her. My other issue during the emergence of Claire's plight was that I had a Spine Op in Newcastle in May 2017. I couldn't walk for constant pain, my GP had me believing I had Sciatica.This lasted five years and I was paralysed with pain. It later turned out to be Spinal Stenosis. My back is great now and I get no pain whatsoever. However,I am sure I would have been here much earlier as I remember the reason I joined up in the first place. I was trying to find information on the DAPHNE Course's. I have still not attended at my local hospital for this course at the moment. My issue right now is my bed is soaked every single night because of my constant sweating, I am up again now at 5am. I also get Rigors when I get out of my bed to change it.Sometimes this occurs 2 or even 3 times a night. I am losing weight also. Does anyone else suffer from this issue? Thank you very much indeed for your response to my question.
     
  9. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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    Have you tested your sugars when you wake? Or asked the Dr what could be the cause?
     
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  10. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hi, I started on syringes and a few years ago went over to pens. I like the 0.5 dose on my Echo pen, as it really helps me. I don't see any problem in using syringes if that is your choice.
    I am on MDI.
     
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    #10 Robinredbreast, Oct 10, 2019 at 7:08 AM
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2019
  11. Delta57

    Delta57 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Yes, I have my machine right next to me once I awaken. My sugars are always between 5 and 7 on checking. Sometimes, they can go up further or even lower into a Hypo state. This is the scary part during the night as I live alone. My partner Claire comes here on weekends and although she can't do much for me in a Hypo situation, I still feel a little bit easier that she is there. Last night, i gave up. Bed was saturated for the second time of which was around 5am.I walk around like a zombie sometimes, no sleep and no energy. I have asked many times at my Gps surgery and the local hospital as to the reason's this is occurring on such a regular basis. I have lived and managed with Type 1 for 31 years, but this profused sweating in getting me down, to say the least.
     
  12. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi again @Delta57 ,

    Sorry to hear about yours & your partner's health issues. (I have an older sister with MS & understand.)

    What time do you inject your Lantus?
    Do you inject prior to bed?
    My own experience (injecting my Lantus around 11pm.) is there can be possible night lows waking me twix 2&3am or 5&6am? Occasionally, a "double bill" at both times? I can wake a bit clammy & either low or with lovely numbers..

    Blood testing is good on waking, but the use of a flash monitor like a Freestyle Libra patch can sometimes expose what goes on between finger the pricks?
    Even us old school injectors are finding this BG sensor a great help..
     
  13. Delta57

    Delta57 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi Jaylee,

    My insulin times are at 11am 3pm and 7pm.
    Lantus at Midnight. I am always up at around 7.30am.
    I awoke last night with a low blood sugar. Checked it and it was 2.5. Time was 4.10am
    No sweats though during this low which I find unusual.
    If I Hypo, I usually know what has caused it.
    I am not aware of any patches or the likes as the nurse looking after my Diabetes is not so competent.
    She is never on the same page as my GP. My Doctor took me off Opiates for my back, when I seen the Nurse 3 days later
    she prescribed me Tramadol which eventually seen me arrive at casualty in the Ambulance. My Doc takes me off and she puts me on them. She even said after my back Op, I think you have sciatica. I went WHAT? I was so annoyed.
    The woman really has no idea as to what she is doing. I despair with her. So in effect, there is only myself who keeps on top of everything. No Doctors anymore and no hospital Diabetic visits.
     
  14. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I changed from Lantus to Tresiba and night sweats stopped along with intense muscle aches.

    DNs told me it couldn't be Lantus but I've never had a problem since changing.
     
  15. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Expert
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    Hi again,

    Sounds about right with the Lantus & it's little quirks that can happen during the night.. & possibly during the late afternoon/early evening? With no fast acting insulin on board to blame..
    I appreciate you feel disenfranchised by your HCPs. & you're comfortable with using syringes.
    We all have our way of dealing with our condition.

    There is technology now that makes monitoring your BGs more coherent. A blood test meter should always be by our side.
    One such piece of kit that is popular is the Freestyle Libre from Abbott. It will continuously monitor your blood & draw up an enlightening graph for the past 8 hours.. (It would probably show you what's happening during the night twixt the finger pricks.) it pretty much takes a reading every 5 minutes...
    You simply scan it using the Abbott reader device, or an application on a smart phone. (Which is how I do it.)

    I wouldn't dissagree the average DSN doesn't realy understand the application of such a device.

    It would be a shame if you weren't informed on the options to make your choice of insulin regime a little easier, giving you a little more confidence & control. (Even as an injector.)

    By all means ask if curious. & we'll try not to get too "boffin."
     
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