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I'm diabetic vs I have diabetes

Discussion in 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say' started by oweri02, Nov 29, 2015.

  1. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    I don't think Diabetes per se is a disease. I'd argue that it's a set of symptoms resulting from a set of different diseases or conditions - i.e. an autoimmune disease that has killed the beta cells, a metabolic condition that has resulted in insulin resistance and high blood glucose levels or the loss of the pancreas.

    In and of its own, saying "I'm a diabetic" is saying "Without medication, I would suffer high blood glucose levels, become very ill and most likely die quickly". But it isn't actually, by definition, a disease!
     
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  2. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    I actually looked up an online definition of disease before posting (cos I have always felt it was dodgy territory) and the definition stated a disease is 'a disorder of structure or function in a human, animal or plant, especially one that produces specific symptoms or that affects a specific location and is not simply a direct result of injury.'
    - Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary

    I don't like it, but it fits.
    I will continue to call D a condition. :)
     
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  3. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I do not have a problem with the word diabetic I have just become one
    Diabetic is the perfectly valid way to describe someone with diabetes
     
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  4. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    I don't care.
     
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  5. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    That's because you are not a pedant or pedantic:D
     
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  6. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Found this :-
    disease
    See definition in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary
    Top 1000 frequently used words
    Line breaks: dis|ease
    Pronunciation: /dɪˈziːz/

    Definition of disease in English:
    noun
    1A disorder of structure or function in a human, animal, or plant, especially one that produces specific symptoms or that affects a specific location and is not simply a direct result of physical injury:bacterial

    meningitis is quite a rare disease


    [MASS NOUN]: heart disease
     
  7. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    CONDITION

    con·di·tion
    (kən-dĭsh′ən)
    n.
    1. A disease or physical ailment.
    2. A state of health or physical fitness.
    v.
    To cause an organism to respond in a specific manner to a conditioned stimulus in the absence of an unconditioned stimulus.
     
  8. ALS

    ALS LADA · Member

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    I must admit to reacting negatively to being called a diabetic but it does depend on the context. I'm more than 'a diabetic' and I don't want to be defined by that condition, or any illness. However, saying "I'm diabetic" can be a shortcut to communicating with some people especially when I'm querying the carb content of food. Having said that, though, I've only been diagnosed since May this year and am already sick of people telling me what I can and cannot eat and about the 'cures' for Type 1! We all wear many labels and I guess they're all appropriate in different contexts - I'm also a mother, sister, friend, wife, teacher, swimmer, wine-drinker, asthmatic, etc.
     
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  9. Donna68

    Donna68 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Don't care. It is part of who I am - it is a descriptive word - just like saying I'm a red head. Therefore I am a short - *****, grumpy, diabetic, mother, nanna, sister, friend, red - head with an under active thyroid and is a bit over weight who volunteers at the junior rugby league club, and local rugby league.
     
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  10. SunnyExpat

    SunnyExpat Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    Mmmh, if being called a diabetic was the worse thing I'd been called..........
     
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  11. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    :hilarious: ROFL. yeh me too. :rolleyes:
     
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  12. Scardoc

    Scardoc · Well-Known Member

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    diabetic

    adjective
    adjective
    1.
    having diabetes.


    noun
    1.
    a person suffering from diabetes.


    All the same. Interestingly, it's the same as being called a man (although the noun can also apply to woman!).

    man
    adjective
    1.
    having testicles

    noun
    1.
    a person suffering from having testicles
     
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  13. SunnyExpat

    SunnyExpat Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    You've been to my local bar then?
     
  14. mrspuddleduck

    mrspuddleduck · Guest

    Perhaps we should be reclassified as 'persons who are a continuous drain on the resources of the NHS including hard line tax dodgers who refuse to eat enough sugar to consider them productive members of society'.......:p:D (Sorry I've a had a bad day!!:() Sue xx
     
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  15. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Speak for yourself. So far in a net contributor thank you!
     
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  16. oweri02

    oweri02 Type 1 · Member

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  17. fairylights

    fairylights Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't think I like it much - as in ' Oh here comes the diabetic' any more than I like (since I have ginger hair) 'Oh here comes the ginger' and this is from supposed friends why not just say 'Oh here's fairylights!) But depends on the context i suppose and I guess the first one (which has been said about me more than once) is what they are trrying to get away from.
     
  18. nickm

    nickm Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    When I went to school, adjectives were "describing" words, not "defining" words. When did this change? Some Americans now prefer to be called a person with diabetes, which they abbreviate to PWD. According to Wikipedia, pwd stands for "person with disability" Who wants to be called that?
     
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