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Is Type 2 Coronavirus low risk

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Kilchoman, Apr 2, 2020.

  1. Kilchoman

    Kilchoman · Newbie

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    Hi I have been advised that type 2 is regarded as "low risk" re coronavirus and I can work in face to face clinical work with covid 19 patients or suspected cases. Is this true and does anyone know where is this advice coming from officially. I have type 2 with high blood sugar levels @20- 24 mmol/l. Can anyone advise
     
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  2. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Where did you get this advice, and what are you eating?
     
  3. Kilchoman

    Kilchoman · Newbie

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    Hi, from my employer. I follow a low carb low calorie diet. very few treats and exercise daily
     
  4. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It's my understanding, not necessarily correct, that well controlled T2 with no other underlying conditions should be ok. I wouldn't call your numbers well controlled. Are you doing anything to try and bring them down?

    Low carb doesn't really go with low cal.

    If you let us know what you eat in a typical day
    Perhaps we can spot some red flags.
     
  5. Kilchoman

    Kilchoman · Newbie

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    breakfast - 1 Weetabix cup of decaff coffee
    lunch 2 rolls with filling-cheese, or ham or similar, cup decaff coffee
    Main meal - quorn meal with vegetables - no potatoes, small glass of milk,
    Supper - Glass milk, toast
    can vary but generally similar to this. I take metformin 2 tabs twice daily, gliclazide 1 tab twice daily, Piaglitazone 1tab daily
     
  6. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    That really isn’t low carb at all.
    Have a look at this info, which will explain better.
    also
     
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  7. xfieldok

    xfieldok Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's not low carb. Can you have bacon and eggs for breakfast?

    Rolls for lunch is not good.

    I assume you are using a meter, test before you eat and 2 hours after the first bite. If the rise is more than 2 then you had too many carbs.

    With readings of 24, you are not far from having to phone 111.

    You can get loads of info and support from this forum.
     
  8. sgm14

    sgm14 · Member

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    From the Faq on the American Diabetes Association website (Doesn't seem to like me posting links)

    Are the risks different for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

    In general, we don’t know of any reason to think COVID-19 will pose a difference in risk between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. More important is that people with either type of diabetes vary in their age, complications and how well they have been managing their diabetes.
    People who already have diabetes-related health problems are likely to have worse outcomes if they contract COVID-19 than people with diabetes who are otherwise healthy, whichever type of diabetes they have.

    ---
    Personally, I was told when I was diagnosed that I wasn't any more likely to get the flu because of my diabetes, but if I did get it, then it would hit me harder and it would take longer to recover. I suspect the same may the true for Covid-19 and given how difficult it is for healthy people to recover from it, that makes it harder for us.

    I don't think the answer makes it clear, but my reading of this is that all diabetics (regardless of their health and/or how well their diabetes is managed) are at greater risk than healthy non-diabetes), but if you have health issues, then it makes it so much worse.
     
  9. sue1309

    sue1309 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Diabetics, T1 or T2, have a lower immune system and therefore could be more prone to contracting Covid19. That's what I've been led to believe and in not going to take the risk. Would anyone want to take the risk? I've been in lockdown since March 13th....goin' nowhere....
     
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  10. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Hi @Kilchoman

    what country do you live in? And what is your HbA1c? Depending on how high it is, you may fall into the extremely high risk group.

    This is where you can find the UK www.gov.uk Information on social distancing and shielding the vulnerable.
    Depending on your HbA1c (and blood glucose levels of 20-24mmol/l suggest you are likely to have a high HbA1c) you may be in the extremely high risk group.

    I suggest you discuss this with your Occupational Health team, and your doctor. If you ask your employer to provide written evidence of the guidance they are using, you will be better placed to understand their decision, and fight it, if appropriate.

    it may also help if you find out what PPE you will be given, and the social distancing conditions under which you will be working.

    As to your statement that you have a low carb way of eating... the diet you describe is carb heavy. Maybe reconsider your diet, with a view to lowering your blood glucose, or contact your doc for a major medication review/overhaul, since those numbers are likely to put you at increased risk of diabetic complications, over time.

    Hope that helps. And good luck with dealing with your doc and occupational health.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  11. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Kilchoman

    I agree that your diet is not low carb. As your blood sugars do not seem controlled I would think that you may well be at higher risk than someone who is not a diabetic. I agree with the suggestion to discuss this with your health care professions- given the type of job and your sugars what do they consider the risk and what (if anything) can you do to reduce the risk.

    This is a scary times and everyone must make the best decisions for themselves and their family and the wider community. Is there maybe duties that you could do that won't put you in contact with patients?

    It is tough- take care.
     
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  12. fatrats

    fatrats Type 2 · Member

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    Hi Brunneria
    I am a key worker with type 2 diabetes. My last HbA1c was 80 in March. Do you have any more specific link that you may have found about this please?
    Thanks
     
  13. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    ... as per the American Diabetes Association (ADA),

    “If diabetes is well-managed, the risk of getting severely sick from COVID-19 is about the same as the general population. When people with diabetes do not manage their diabetes well and experience fluctuating blood sugars, they are generally at risk for a number of diabetes-related complications. Having heart disease or other complications in addition to diabetes could worsen the chance of getting seriously ill from COVID-19, like other viral infections, because your body’s ability to fight off an infection is compromised.”

    Quoted in "Diabetes Daily"
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  14. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    "When people with diabetes develop a viral infection, it can be harder to treat due to fluctuations in blood glucose levels and, possibly, the presence of diabetes complications. There appear to be two reasons for this. Firstly, the immune system is compromised, making it harder to fight the virus and likely leading to a longer recovery period. Secondly, the virus may thrive in an environment of elevated blood glucose."

    From the International Diabetes Federation.

    "Diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that causes high blood sugar levels. In general, infectious diseases such as COVID-19 are more serious in people with diabetes.

    Diabetes also keeps the body in a low-level state of inflammation, which makes its healing response to any infection slower.

    High blood sugar levels combined with a persistent state of inflammation makes it much more difficult for people with diabetes to recover from illnesses such as COVID-19.

    Anyone with diabetes who notices symptoms of COVID-19 should speak to their doctor as soon as possible."

    From "Medical News Today" https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/covid-19-and-diabetes#complications
     
  15. ptallett

    ptallett Type 2 · Newbie

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    As an example, here is what I ate yesterday (I'm T2):

    Breakfast: 0% fat yogurt + fresh raspberries, black coffee
    Lunch: 3 x scrambled eggs + smoked salmon, tea
    Dinner: Filet steak + mixed salad, gin+tonic (my reward)

    Note the complete lack of bread or pasta. My waking glucose was 9.2, my last HBA1c was 50 (it was 98 when I was diagnosed). I walk for 45 minutes every day up and down hills and try to close all 3 rings on my Apple watch.

    I am not happy with where my numbers are, 3 months after I was diagnosed, my HBA1c was 43 and waking glucose 6.2. I am also still very overweight with a BMI of 34.
     
    #15 ptallett, Apr 8, 2020 at 4:06 AM
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2020
  16. searley

    searley Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I had a long discussion with my diabetic consultant and covid formed part of it..

    In short as a diabetic with no other conditions if you are reasonably well controlled you are classed as vulnerable so extra care with social distancing.

    Worse control ie hba1c above 79 or other serious conditions will put you in the extreme risk (12 week isolation).

    I have hba1c of 76 and high blood pressure and just classed as vulnerable.

    Don’t just trust what employers say as sometimes they just want you to work.

    Contact your gp either by phone or econsult if you have it and ask them to put you in a risk category. I did he said vulnerable so at least I had that to goto my employer with and things were put in place to reduce my risk and contact
     
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  17. Allrightdrive

    Allrightdrive Type 2 · Newbie

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    It’s too high a risk to carry on working especially if your job includes close contact with the public. I drive buses for a living, so I have also been off for over 2 weeks now.
     
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  18. Allan59

    Allan59 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I have been home for 2 weeks and I plan to stay home for another 2 weeks - I run my own company, so if I am not working- no money comes in to the company and that means no wages for me - but I am thinking about my health and not the money.
    And if so and needed- I will stay home for another month .
     
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    • Hug Hug x 1
  19. BaliRob

    BaliRob Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Forget the subject of your post - I had to read your blood sugar levels THREE times - they are totally unacceptable and
    dangerous and, with great respect, you seem to have posted them as a 'badge of pride', You need medical attention NOW get them sorted to at LEAST below 10 mmol/L as soon as you can. One poster here said that you would soon need to be phoning 911. Remember - we are ALL here to help each other - not to criticise you - ok?
     
  20. Damtov8

    Damtov8 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Get an app on your phone like myfitnesspal so that you can work out the carbohydrate intake of your meals. At the moment you are eating a very very high carb content despite the fact that the calories may be low. You need to eat more fat and natural and unprocessed food. Really the only carbohydrates should be green vegetables and a few berries and you should keep your carbohydrates to below 30 g a day. Your blood sugar is very out of control. If you carry on eating like that eventually will become very sick. Why don’t you join the Low carb program and they will help you to know which foods are good for you.
     
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