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Just Been Diagnosed Type 2!

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by welshexile1963, Aug 13, 2016.

  1. welshexile1963

    welshexile1963 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Had a phone call from the Diabetic Nurse at the surgery to go and see her next week as I have type 2 Diabetes, came as a hell of a shock, I said "is that diet controlled" and she said I would need medication! So head all over the place, I used to up to about 15 years ago regularly train in Powerlifting but then kids came along and time, work etc got in the way, but as of this January I went back to the Gym and have since then been training 3 times a week and in there for at least 1 1/2 hours each time and after doing my weight training routine do 20 minutes on the treadmill and I walk everywhere as well.

    I have always been stocky/plump but since going back to the gym I have lost a lot of fat, but put on weight as muscle weighs more than fat, it has been commented on by work mates and family "have you lost weight"! I have been eating a lot of carbs as I thought this would help with my training and also taking in a lot of protein so worried now about how this will effect my training.

    Anyway I will learn all I can and continue in a positive way!
     
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  2. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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    @welshexile1963 - Hello and Welcome to the Forum. I will tag @daisy1 who will provide you with some basic information that all new members receive.
     
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  3. welshexile1963

    welshexile1963 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thanks for that, much appreciated.
     
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  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Hi and welcome,

    There is a whole forum section for fitness/exercise/sport that you may find helpful.

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/category/fitness-exercise-and-sport.33/

    I'm afraid it is carbs that are the culprits in raising blood sugar levels. They all convert to glucose once inside the system and therefore need to be reduced. Perhaps you could ask some questions on the above forum?
     
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  5. welshexile1963

    welshexile1963 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thank you.
     
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  6. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @welshexile1963

    Hello and welcome to the forum :) Here is the information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Diet is indeed important in controlling your levels and this information gives you advice about diet and eating lower carb. There is a link to the Low Carb Program which should be helpful to you too. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help.



    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS



    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 147,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
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  7. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi and welcome. Yes, eating lots of carbs is the opposite of what you should be doing. Have plenty of proteins and fats to keep you feeling full and fueling the exercise. Have low-GI carbs when you do have them. With a bit of luck any medication may just be the Metformin many of us have.
     
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  8. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Things will steadily improve once you reduce your carbs...
     
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  9. Bergkamp777

    Bergkamp777 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Definitely the cars that are the culprit try to cut them down a bit your sugar leval will be controlled. Good luck

    Sent from my SM-G900F using DCUK Forum mobile app
     
  10. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think you would benefit with advice from people who also do serious weight training I am sure there are some here so maybe do a new message asking if there are any weight trainers here who can give you advice
     
  11. debrasue

    debrasue · Guest

    Hi, @welshexile1963, and welcome to the forums!
    I see you have already received a lot of helpful information to get your head around. And I agree with other posters that a carb-rich diet could well be responsible for (or significantly contributing to) your increased BG levels.
    It's definitely worth getting hold of a testing kit and strips, which you might be able to source through your GP surgery, or you may have to buy yourself - but it will be worth its weight in gold either way! By testing immediately before and 2 hours after eating, you'll be able to find out straight away which foods are affecting your BG levels and which to avoid.
    Not everyone needs medication. Depending on your current HbA1c, it may be worth asking your DN whether you could have a few weeks' "grace" before starting meds, to see if you can control your T2 through diet alone. You'll need to be guided by her, however, as she will be able to assess whether or not this is a viable proposition in your particular case.
    My GP (grudgingly) allowed me to try diet alone in the first instance. That was 5 months ago and adopting the LCHF programme outlined on here has resulted in my BG levels returning to the non-diabetic range. That doesn't mean that my diabetes has 'reversed' or that I am no longer T2; it simply means that as long as I'm careful what I eat, I don't need medication at present and I can keep my BGs within normal parameters to hopefully reduce the chances of diabetic complications.
    I wish you lots of luck in whatever you decide to do.
    Don't forget to share your journey with us. :)
    Hugs
     
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  12. Heretic1

    Heretic1 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    @welshexile1963
    I like you was completely shocked to find myself here just over 3 months ago.
    My BG levels were very high, as was my weight - BMI 33, BP, HR etc etc and was 'labelled accordingly!
    Now my BG is 2 points short of being completely out of the diabetic range (still realising this is a life long badge I will always have) my BMI is now 26 (and falling) and all other levels completely normal - I'm most definitely a transformed person!
    How?? Well as others have said just be very careful with 'carbs'. Some in here eradicate them completely and treat them as evil - I'm just a lot more careful than I was, but do still include them and also eating (and drinking) everything else very healthily. I've also done loads more activity, running, walking, cycling, spinning .... any form of CV exercise I can find! and now 'burning' approx 3200 - 4000 calories per day - and enjoying it! I now need to do more resistance work to get rid of the loose / saggy bits! :)
    I've practically and physically hit this square in the face, though I will be honest, mentally and emotionally I am not coping as well!
    Everyone responds differently to this I will not try to tell you what to do as others will. The only advice I would give is listen to advice from in here AND from your healthcare team (which will doubtless conflict) and elsewhere then do what is right for YOU!
    Good luck !
     
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