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Lack of motivation

Discussion in 'Children & Teens' started by Little_Lucy, Dec 29, 2018.

  1. Little_Lucy

    Little_Lucy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone,
    So my name is Lucy, 16 years old and I’ve had diabetes for a little over 3 years and recently I’ve been finding it hard to find motivation to test my blood sugar, change my pump, check keytones and basically anything to do with diabetes.

    I don’t really know what to do as when I first got it I used to be on top of everything and now I’ve become to be lazy with it and I know I need to change but I just don’t have any motivation to change.

    Such as I’ll be at school and I’ll think I need to test my blood sugar before I eat but I just don’t even though I know I need to and my friends are used to it now and find it normal to here beeps from my pump or my metres and I also find there is lack of motivation to do it at home and I don’t know why.

    I guess maybe I’m just sick of it? And I want to find the easy way but there is no easy way.
    Has anyone gone through anything like this before who can give me some help on what to do?
     
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  2. Jollymon

    Jollymon Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    We all tend to go through periods of denial. If I ignore this thing that I should be managing, maybe it’ll go away. At least that’s how I used to rationalize it. It does work that way.

    It’s hard to do the things that we have to do. Especially since most all of the other people out there don’t have to do them. We aren’t like most other people, but we’d like to be.

    Try to stay motivated. Try to do the things that you should be doing. There is a whole dark side of staying in denial which won’t help you.
     
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    #2 Jollymon, Dec 30, 2018 at 3:03 AM
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2019
  3. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @Little_Lucy ,

    It's like most things in life.. Leaky roof? Place a bucket under the drip. However, that bucket will need emptying as it gets full.
    Meanwhile there's water damage where the leak is located..

    Start with getting back into the meter checks & don't be discouraged by any rogue results. Sounds like you're surrounded by cool friends... :)
     
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  4. Little_Lucy

    Little_Lucy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you I’ll try starting that again
     
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  5. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Little_Lucy I think you have done the best thing possible to help yourself. Here is an extract from something I wrote in 2009, describing my life as a Type 1 in the early 1970's:
    This is probably because I was very poorly controlled throughout my time [at senior school]. One of the doctors at Southlands Hospital wrote to me saying:
    Dear Grant,
    Further to your visit to the Diabetic Clinic last week, I have noted that your blood sugar was 26mmol again, which I feel is rather high.

    At the time I was affected by a teenage resentment of my condition, a perverse aversion to outside opinion, and a complete lack of awareness of the significance of any information. As I write this I can see all kinds of interference on the computer screen caused by retinopathy: I am unable to keep my hands steady (not because of Vin de Pays de L’Herault); and I am aware that my kidneys are struggling to survive. All this was wrapped up in those few words in the above letter. Throughout my life I have been regularly reminded, either through personal contacts, diabetic journals, visits to clinics, or through books, that all diabetics run these risks and that the condition, if unmanaged, can be fatal. Why is it that teenagers happily (?) ignore these warnings? On several occasions in the last thirty years I have been contacted by doctors, asking me whether I would be prepared to talk to a sixteen year old who is ignoring advice. Of course I would. Could they get in touch with me? On each occasion, nobody has telephoned. I think at this stage in life, when hormones are unruly, faces look like Spotted **** with a hairy frame, girls (or boys) are worryingly important, sexuality is uncertain, parents are a bloody menace and so on, the last thing a person needs is an uncomfortable label. I never wanted to talk about it. I’ve more than made up for it now. I have been able to manage The Enemy far more effectively since I have been prepared to discuss it. But, even at the age of twenty this can be daunting.

    As a teenager I ignored the warnings, but I am also aware that this is a natural human reaction. You have more than telephoned a random local diabetic. You have reached out to thousands in one hit, which is admirable. You deserve every success. Good luck!
     
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  6. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Little_Lucy, Thank you for being brave enough to say what others have wished they could have said. Life with diabetes can be a drag which never lets up. Your honesty and wish to share your problems are some of the best signs that you have the where-with-all to deal with this dilemma or this fork in the road. And @Grant_Vicat is right. There is so much going on at 16. Reminds me of that old song "At Seventeen" by Janis Ian.
    I was 16 , 48 years ago. and had been on insulin for 3 years, Sound familiar? And crazy as it sounds life with diabetes was easier in some ways: no pumps to fill and set up, only 2 basic insulins to inject, no finger pricks, just urine testing and diet was to do with eating the same each day, filling up on cheese to ease hunger as I grew and, whatever else, avoid hypos.
    But somehow I was supposed to ward off the evils of diabetes complications with this 'set of tools'. The motivation to conform to the rules that doctors set down for diabetes was by instilling fear, the fear of complications.
    You know what? I would swop places with you if that were possible - except that would be most unfair on you.
    The best motivation I can offer you and others in your situation is that even with the archaic way diabetes was managed back in the 1960's I have somehow managed to be alive, well, healthy with just minor diabetic-related troubles like cataracts (I blame the Aussie sun), carpal tunnels/trigger fingers) now 52 years after diagnosis.
    The fork in the road you face is whether with all the technology these days that can keep blood sugars monitored, insulin delivered and complications at bay and even reversed, do you put diabetes in the too hard basket and ignore all the pluses of modern technology (things I, for example, had no access to until well past the time when complications can show up) or do you regain the rhythm, little by little, knowing that you are actually doing yourself a favour both now and for the long-term.
    You will have noted that as diabetics we need to think ahead. Make sure we take some pump supplies, insulin , spare food etc with us in case we are delayed. Allow for exercise, eating out and 101 other things. That can be a curse in the sense of being so un-spontaneous, but we also know how embarrassing, un-cool and sometimes dangerous a lack of preparation can be!!.
    Our peers do not have the need to be as responsible. But at some point we all need to develop the ability to be responsible if we wish to enjoy more freedom in what we do and how we decide on things.
    What made my life bearable, worth battling against the lapses in doing the testing etc?
    Humour: giving injections was 'javelin practice", my new insulin pump (only started on pumps in 2012) is called 'Tonto" and if I was going to really stir things up I would be using the soft toy lion with a pouch (one the Pump company has this as an accessory for children with insulin pumps) to house my pump when out and about. And rather than being down on myself when I forget to do something or make a mistake, I can blithely say, "Well it was either my fault or the weather's" (and the weather cannot speak back) Self humour takes the sting out of the situation. That does not mean I should be slack or irresponsible but just not be too critical of myself.
    Breathing: I used to tense up if I had a hypo - the embarrassment, the humiliation - that is pretty immediate but over time I have learnt to diminish the negative feelings and keep the humourous parts, What helped was the realisation that stress (I have to do this finger-prick, Oh *** I forgot that bolus) made me hold my breath and keep all the tension inside. Nothing could be reasoned out or solved in that state. If I took even, steady breaths, not too rapid, not too deep, I could think, re-prioritise and find my way out of the jungle. You may been unconsciously tensing up at the thought of restarting testing or attention to diet.
    Friends: Your peer group is really important and most important are: friends who come to understand your needs, who can look out for you when things are tough, or you are slipping into a hypo because you are distracted by something. They will be important to some degree throughout your life. My friend whom I go kite-flying with will occasionally say: "Is ya kite flying in the water? -a reference to perhaps getting hypo.
    Hobbies and Pastimes: give you interests, skills, to share with peers and fellow enthusiasts, can grow with you, can help with exercise, provide some distraction from the ups and downs of life.
    So Best Wishes at 16 with taking the short view of doing what is needed to feel better immediately and the longer term view of keeping on keeping well. Diabetes:
    It is all about balance..............it can be overwhelming at times ............................things can go wrong

    ............ P3310264.jpg .......................... IMG_3102 (1).jpg ........................................................... IMG_3824.jpg

    But we learn and others help....................................And we find that most things are possible

    .............. IMG_3067.jpg ............................................................ 17903592_10206204455349159_992899227923968847_n.jpg
     
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  7. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Moderator
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  8. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Little Lucy, I'd be surprised if any teenage type 1 didn't suffer from bouts of under motivation. If you wanted to put a label on it then that label would be diabetic burnout. Its really mature to have noticed so kudos to you and I hope I am not being patronising (my 16 yr old daughter would probably disagree - sorry).
    Lots of wise words on here already and my only thought for you at age 16 is that it is a time of working out who you are and what your place in the world is versus just doing whatever your teachers, parents and even peers are doing.. Diabetes is just a thing you have to deal with 'on the side' but if you don't really know why or where you are heading in life (understandable at this stage) then it is likely you will feel under motivated to carry out the daily checks and dosing needed.
    Not saying that you have to have a total life plan at any stage but this under motivation could be a sign that you are a bit adrift right now?
    I am hoping this isn't a cry for attention but you don't sound like you are suffering emotionally?
     
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  9. Little_Lucy

    Little_Lucy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Erm well yeah I do suffer a bit emotionally and I didn’t show it in this post so I understand why you wouldn’t think so.
    I don’t like to talk about it much because it’s not nice to talk about but I do suffer from panic attacks and my friends think it has stemmed from my diabetes.
    I understand you wouldn’t know cause I didn’t say anything and I’m not meaning to be horrible in my tone but you are right I am a bit adrift with the upcoming exams for GCSEs and having to go to college but thank you for the advice I will think about my future and try and get back on track.
     
  10. Little_Lucy

    Little_Lucy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’m alright thank you, feeling a bit down but other than that I’m alright
     
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  11. Little_Lucy

    Little_Lucy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @kitedoc
    Thank you this was very helpful and I appreciate it and the thought very much and I think putting a bit of humour into it will help so thank you
     
  12. Little_Lucy

    Little_Lucy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you very much this was very helpful and truly inspiring, what was it from Id very much like to read it as i sound like I would be able to relate
     
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  13. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thats the spirit! And this M&M agrees:
    P9090258.jpg
     
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  14. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    As I am unable to publish details on this or any other public forum, I can only Private Message any info, but only if you are comfortable with that.
     
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  15. Little_Lucy

    Little_Lucy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Have messaged you :)
     
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  16. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Literally just sent my reply!
     
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  17. Abbie_181003

    Abbie_181003 · Newbie

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    Hei @Little_Lucy
    I can understand where you’re coming from as I’m 15 and had diabetes for just over 5 years
    If you ever need to talk I’m here
     
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  18. Kyraa_00

    Kyraa_00 · Member

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    I 100% feel you! I’m 15 and have been diabetic for 10 years so anyone would of thought I’m used to it!! But I went through a period of time towards the end of last year where I wasn’t testing, wasn’t keeping an eye on it and not giving my insulin or giving too much - I motivated myself slowly because I knew if I carried on I would have to stop my part time job with kids and I wouldn’t be able to drive!! Try find things you really want to do which you wouldn’t be able to if your diabetes wasn’t controlled!! Hope you’re okay and message me if you need to xx
     
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  19. Charis1213

    Charis1213 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My niece has been type 1 from age 13, she has had her ups and downs , but she got married last year and has a beautiful little girl . Her mindset is that there is nothing she can do to change her condition so just get on with life and enjoy everyday .

    I think both of you little Lucy and Kyraa are really brave xx
     
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