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Late night eating and morning readings

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Bogie, Aug 21, 2019.

  1. Bogie

    Bogie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Looks like if I eat more late at night (11pm - 1am), and regardless of what I eat, my morning reading is lower than if I don't eat much at all.

    I am a short sleeper (5-6 hrs maximum), so always awake late at night - quite often not going to sleep until around 2am, waking between 6 and 7 am checking BG level before 8am. No naps during the day as I work full-time from home.

    Seems that the more carbs I have for late-night snacks then the lower my morning levels are.

    I am sure there is an explanation for this ... right?
     
  2. derry60

    derry60 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I am exactly the same. If I eat around 10 pm I have lower Blood readings in the morning
     
  3. Walking Girl

    Walking Girl Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. I can’t give you an explanation because I’m the opposite, but I’m not on any meds so that’s probably a key difference?

    Using the Freestyle Libre, I found that the advice of a snack at bedtime was the worst possible thing I could do. My BG would rise after the snack at 9 pm-ish, then do a long, slllooowww slide not getting to base until about 2 am. If I ate dinner at my normal time of 6pm-ish, I was at baseline by bedtime and stayed low all night. My dawn phenomenon was also much less pronounced.

    I tried it several times, with various meals. Now, my kitchen is firmly closed after dinner, other than water and unsweetened tea.
     
  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    It is most likely because the late meal, with carbs, creates a huge insulin spike in order to clear the glucose. High circulating insulin is just as bad for us as raised glucose levels. It causes more insulin resistance, weight gain, and fatty livers. It is best avoided. It is high insulin levels in a typical T2 that was one of the main causes for becoming T2.

    As you are a short sleeper, do you test during the night to see what is happening?
     
  5. Bogie

    Bogie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well, first, when I sleep ... I am out for the count. No waking to do a test :) Short sleep time but really deep sleep, and not tired during the day. Different metabolism I guess.

    If I do not eat at night then I do not sleep as soundly and my BG on the wake-up is much higher. This morning after the midnight snack was 4.5 mmol compared to not eating after dinner at all results in high 7s or 8s+ in the morning .. probably due to a liver dump.

    Weight is not an issue as 3 years ago I was 210 lbs and now at 159-161 lbs and really don't want to weigh any less at my age and body frame. Only Diabetes med is Jardiance tablet, 25mg, once per day. I also take a few supplements, including Blueberry capsules (500 mg, 2 x 3 times per day) from Jamieson. Pantoprozole (for GERD), .5mg Lorazepam for controlled IBS, Rosuvastatin 10mg/day, Perindopril 2mg/day, Chromium 200mcg/day, and .6ml prescribed medical CBD Oil (CBD 15mg/ml w/THC 8.5mg/ml) evenings for arthritis and back pain. After BG test each morning I have a Boost Diabetic beverage (14 carbs) for breakfast.
     
  6. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    I have no other answer for you. Maybe someone else can add something.
     
  7. derry60

    derry60 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Maybe some people are just different
     
  8. Bogie

    Bogie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I do like your possible reason before, though, and tomorrow I will be talking to the education person at the Diabetes Clinic I go to (LMS). I like having questions that are tough to answer :) Will post back with the answer or if they don't have a definite explanation.
     
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  9. Bogie

    Bogie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I definitely agree with that! There are so many differences with each person's makeup, what other medical conditions they have or have had, surgeries, hereditary factors, environment, smoker or non-smoker, lifestyle choices, etc., and of course, age. We are all different "combination locks" in what we are. Diabetes, T2D, has been a part of the history of each generation of my mother's family tree ... and my mother, myself, and two sisters are the recipients of that heritage. While we (all Diabetics) have many medical "tools" to help us in our battle with Diabetes, there is no "one size fits all" solution. Just a 30-minute drive from where I live is the birthplace home of Frederick Banting, co-inventor of insulin. Alliston, Ontario, Canada.
     
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