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Latest HbA1c

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Robbity, May 12, 2018.

  1. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    I had basic results back yesterday from my recent checkup. HbA1c is 43 which is more or less what I expected - it's always a point or so higher that the predicted figure from my meter averages. Cholesterol is 4.8, but I need to request a complete breakdown from surgery, rather than rely on the abbreviated info on the "action plan" form I'm sent to fill in before talk with nurse at the end of the month. Feet are fine, and weight is stable.

    I've also had back my retinal screening results, which are aslo OK, but my main issue is a long term and pre-diatebetes cataract, which they didn't comment on this time.

    So I reckon I'll survive another year....

    Robbity
     
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  2. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So they don't intend to treat that?
     
  3. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    No when I was being treated at the hospital Eye Clinic I was told they didn't want to do anything in case there was a problem as my other eye haf been badly damaged due to iritis and damage to the surface. But I suppose it isn't actually diabetes related so maybe not for the screening people to say... Though a couple of checkups back the technician then did discuss it with me.

    Sometimes I feel stuck between the devil and the deep blue sea. :banghead::banghead:

    Robbity
     
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  4. archersuz

    archersuz Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Great results, well done.
     
  5. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    congratulations :):):):):)
     
  6. NewTD2

    NewTD2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Having tight control is king!

    Well done!!!
     
  7. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    Congratulations @Robbity :) Well done, stable Mabel. I know just waht you mean about the HbA1c being higher than other markers indicate. Same with me, as you know. We are special - our red blood cells are healthy enough to live a very long time. ;)
     
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  8. John b50

    John b50 Type 2 · Newbie

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  9. John b50

    John b50 Type 2 · Newbie

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    What is the best HaB1c
     
  10. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    6F9D841E-C2E9-4EE3-8719-74EE4963DA1B.jpeg
    The further into the green on this graphic the better. I see you are new @John b50 so I’ll tag in @daisy1 for her welcome info post for you.
     
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  11. tsouza

    tsouza Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    After how long? What helped most?
     
  12. tsouza

    tsouza Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Tight control of what in particular?
     
  13. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @Robbity Edited to tag @John b50 who this post is intended for! Thanks for pointing this out @nomoredonuts and @Robbity

    Hello Robbity and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it interesting and useful. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
    #13 daisy1, May 17, 2018 at 7:44 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2018
  14. John b50

    John b50 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thank you
     
  15. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the drugs being taken, as often it is better to reduce the dose.
     
  16. JonM1

    JonM1 Type 2 · Member

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    7 months ago diagnosed T2 with HbA1c of 85. Down to 40 at three month review, then 37 at 6 months. No meds.

    Increased exercise to 300 lengths a week, lost 26kg. Eat low carb (mainly cooked from scratch since mainstream retail multiples' provision of low carb convenience products is abysmal).

    It takes persistence and is just remission, not a cure. Seriously miss all things potato but have tasty healthier subs for bread, rice, pasta and sugar.

    Learning how to manage my condition despite the NHS Scotland refusal to provide test materials (I self fund, Nice guidelines don't apply) and the hopelessly dated high carb diet advice that remains current is down to this forum and the low carb programme materials and members.

    Many thanks to all.
     
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  17. NewTD2

    NewTD2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    If you miss potato, there is a better alternative - "CELERIAC".

    It's a low-carb root vegetable. Cut medium size, boil for 10 minutes then deep fry or roast in oven with salt, pepper and paprika.

    Tastes better than potatos !!!
     
  18. JonM1

    JonM1 Type 2 · Member

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    I use celeriac a lot - it grows very well in our garden.

    I like matchstick fries from it using an air frier, mash, remoulade, using it as coleslaw constituent, baked and stuffed etc. I'll try the roast version - sounds nice, but no it isn't a spud sub. The flavour could not be more different.
     
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  19. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    For me, the best HbA1c is the lowest I can achieve and maintain long term, which I've been able to do for four years now. However managing my glucose levels on a day to day basis ands keeping them stable is my main aim and more important to me than my HbA1c figures, as I find these more useful and informative than 6 monthly or so HbA1c averages.

    I've been T2 for 4 and a half years, and have maintained (mainly) low pre-diabetic/high normal glucose levels for most of that time - due to eating a low carb high(er) fat diet of less than 50g carbs a day.

    I'm not currently on any diabetic meds, but until about a year ago was previously taking metformin SR. But how we manage will essentially depend on how any one person's body is affected by their diabetes.

    @JonM1: Most T2s are in the same position and we have to self-fund if we choose/want to test.

    Robbity
     
  20. Roozell

    Roozell Type 2 · Newbie

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    We
    well done I'm waiting for my latest test to be done so far down from 130 to 50 low carb diet so see what happens ( and 5 stone weight lose to ) keep going
     
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