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Link found between higher mole count and increased type 2 diabetes risk

Discussion in 'Diabetes News' started by DCUK NewsBot, Jan 6, 2017.

  1. DCUK NewsBot

    DCUK NewsBot · Well-Known Member

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    A link has been found between having a large number of moles and a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a review of two studies. US researchers say these findings suggest a "common mechanism" shared by nevogenesis, the medical term for moles and birthmarks, and type 2 diabetes. Dr Yiqing Song, associate professor in the Richard M Fairbanks School of Public Health at Indiana University, which conducted the research, said: "Our results indicate a potential common mechanism shared by nevogenesis and type 2 diabetes, although further studies are warranted to confirm our findings and clarify the underlying mechanism." Data was taken from just over 26,000 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), which began in 1988, and 67,050 women from the Nurses' Health Study in 1986. The researchers took into account lifestyle and the medical history of the participants, and the number of moles on the left arm was measured on each participant, from shoulder to wrist. The research team only focused on what was deemed "common moles" and did not note down the type of mole each participant had on their arm. There were just over 9,000 cases of type 2 diabetes in both genders, and those with a greater mole count were more likely to have developed the condition. This positive association remained consistent even after confounding variables were considered, such as age, BMI, multivitamin use, smoking status, alcohol, physical activity and family history of diabetes. The researchers wrote: "To our knowledge, the present study is the first to prospectively examine the association of melanocytic nevus count with type 2 diabetes risk. "Our findings suggest that mole count could be a novel marker for development of type 2 diabetes, indicating a unique nevus development-related mechanism." The study was published online in the journal Diabetic Medicine.

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  2. CollieBoy

    CollieBoy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Next,
    a study into replacing mice with moles in clinical trials:wideyed:

    Sorry, wrong kind of mole :rolleyes:
     
    • Funny Funny x 4
  3. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have quite a few voles on my property. Perhaps that's why I got type 2?
     
  4. CherryAA

    CherryAA Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What about freckles ?
     
  5. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    "Our findings suggest that mole count could be a novel marker for development of type 2 diabetes,"

    Yeah, that's a very solid conclusion. You could replace suggest and could with possibly and maybe, but then it kinda lacks the impact they may have been wanting :)
     
  6. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    Oh dear!!!! I burst out laughing...

    But seriously, in the interests of scientific evidence: I'd not had or seen any moles around in the last few years prior to my diabetes, but we use to get a lot of mole hills locally (including in the garden) many years ago when I was young and fit. So for me the evidence appears to be to the contrary...:wideyed:

    Robbity
     
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