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Low Blood Pressure and headaches/migraines

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by BethTwydall, Mar 29, 2017.

  1. BethTwydall

    BethTwydall Type 1 · Active Member

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    So this might be a diabetes related question, but it also might not...
    I was diagnosed type 1 at 9 years old but one of my earliest memories is having excruciating headaches at about age 4/5 and literally screaming on the sofa in pain. I've pretty much had these headaches ever since, sometimes they come and go and sometimes they develop in to a migraine. I can have a few a month or I can go 6/7 months without one. I've always thought they were linked to my diabetes somehow, however the way they can be described is like a pulse or heart beat in my head, that gets worse as I move around. I also have low blood pressure. Is there a link? Does anyone else suffer from similar headaches. I've had this one for 3 days now, it keeps waking me up at night and I'm suffering!

    Xx
     
  2. Sibyl

    Sibyl Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear about the headaches, Beth. I don't think it's directly related to the diabetes unless you get them say when your bg is very high. Have you discovered your headaches and low bp with your doctor?
     
  3. Jamesuk9

    Jamesuk9 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I suffered a lifetime since a teenager from cluster migraine.

    It took over 2 decades of trial and error to find the answer. Nothing used to prevent migraine would stop them and nothing used to treat them would stop them.

    A consultant suggested I try Zolmitriptan (Zomig) nasal spray in the event of an attack and they work brilliantly. Stops an attack in under an hour and no repeat for several weeks.

    The downside is the cost to the NHS at around £15 a single dose, most doctors will not prescribe due to cost until all other avenues have been tried.

    That said, they are available in tablet form but not as effective from my experience.
     
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  4. Sibyl

    Sibyl Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Did they give you any idea what caused the attacks?
     
  5. Jamesuk9

    Jamesuk9 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    No reason ever found.... I get them less frequently and less severely now as I've aged but they have been recurrent for over 35 yrs. Always the same headache in exactly the same place.

    It took many years but I now recognise the symptoms and can stop them before they start usually.

    Yawning uncontrollably for several minutes out of the blue is my usual warning sign. There are others too but the yawning normally comes first.
     
  6. Sibyl

    Sibyl Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Wow! I have a friend that suffers from severe migraines. When we were younger they could leave her in a dark room for up to three days. She knew she had some triggers and thought it was some sort of allergy.
     
  7. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Migraines are typically caused/preceded by dilation of the cerebral veins (not arteries). The various therapeutic agents are typically some sort of vasoconstrictor. The classic drug we use called nitroglycerine put under the tongue is also a venodilator, and it can cause wicked migraine-type headaches in novice users.
     
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  8. BethTwydall

    BethTwydall Type 1 · Active Member

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    I try and stay away from drugs as much as possible (which is ironic pumping insulin 24/7 lol). I take ibruprofen/paracetamol if my head gets really bad and it doesn't touch it at all. It feels like an energy block in my head, it's really hard to describe. I had crazy blood sugars on Sunday so I'm wondering if that brought it on. I will have to make notes so I can see if there's any patterns. I have an appointment at the GP's tomorrow...
     
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  9. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member
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    The wife a non diabetic gets dreadful migraines .. and has low blood pressure .. but has been migraine free since she found out she has a rapeseed oil allergy .. life in the food department has become a little restrictive .. but worth it as a week in dreadful pain locked in a dark room is no fun for her .. also no fun for me left to sort out my own food that will just be chips and chips ..not the best for a T2 diabetic !!
     
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