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Low carb and Insulin Pump

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by scottishkate, Jan 8, 2009.

  1. scottishkate

    scottishkate · Well-Known Member

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    Hello folks and Happy New Year!

    I wasn't sure whether to post this in the low-carb forum, the type 1 forum or the insulin pump forum so I'll pop it here and hope for the best.

    I've been succesfully low-carbing for around four months now and have achieved amazing results - my last Hba1c was 6.1 and I'm hoping my next one will be in the 5's. Anyhoo, I've just been approved for a pump (I was on a waiting list for just over a year and discovered the benefits of the low-carb way during this time) which I was previously very keen to get as my bs were on the old up/down rollarcoaster many type 1's will be familiar with. However, I've pretty much managed to stabilise my bs with no major swings by adopting a low-carb approach so now I don't know whether to accept or pull-out of pump therapy.

    So really what I'd like to know is has anyone been in the same situation/is there anyone on a pump who combines this therapy whilst still low-carbing/will it offer an even more subtle method of control over bs when comboned with low-carb? I think I need to go and have a chat with my consultant but I'd appreciate anyone's thoughts on the matter - sometimes it helps to get the opinions of others :)

    Thanks! Katie.
     
  2. Trinkwasser

    Trinkwasser · Well-Known Member

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  3. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

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    soctishkate

    Moved here to see if better response..

    Well done on achieveing your better results , if I was you I would still try the pump as this could improve your sucess even more, and have advantages for you in other ways...

    At the end of the day if you don't like it you can always hand it back and return to your injections
     
  4. Katharine

    Katharine · Well-Known Member

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    I think that you can always try the pump and give it back if you don't like it, but it will be more difficult to get one in future, especially as your control will probably be perfect.

    I don't expect your control to be better on a pump compared to multiple daily injections especially if you are using advanced techniques as described at www.dsolve.com.

    What you may find, after the run in phase, is that it is more convenient for you. I think it is a personal choice but one that could be difficult to make till you have tried it out for yourself.
     
  5. scottishkate

    scottishkate · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your opinions.

    I went to the pump information meeting last night at the ERI and I have a few months to consider what to do.

    What was interesting were the snacks laid out for the diabetics attending - sandwiches, crisps, fruit juice and CAKE! Carb central - I had a bottle of water and when asked by someone why I wasn't eating and I explanined I ate a reduced card diet I was met with looks of horror (from two other diabetics).

    The other thing which fairly shocked me was when two other diabetics were talking to me about DAFNE. They told me that the snacks on offer there included bowls of chocolate minsterels and peanuts. Apparently they were told that in order to 'manage' their diabetes more carefully they should carefully count the carbs in the chocolate and bolus accordingly but that they could tuck into the peanuts freely as they liked as they were only protein and didn't contain carbs so wouldn't affect bs!!!! :shock: :shock: When I told them that peanuts do indeed contain carbs and would certainly raise my bs they refused to believe me!

    I'm very glad I don't need to go that course - I think I would come to blows with the 'educators' :twisted:

    Katie.
     
  6. Katharine

    Katharine · Well-Known Member

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    I think that you will be able to educate the DAFNE staff much better than they will educate you!
     
  7. Stuboy

    Stuboy · Well-Known Member

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    im affraid i have to say that im of the opinion that you CAN bolus for snacks such as crisps and chocolate. The reason i say so is that i've done it many many times and with success.

    Low carb doesn't appeal to everyone. That's all i'll say about that :)

    Anyway... I think you should go for the pump and give it a go! You dont know unless you try...
     
  8. scottishkate

    scottishkate · Well-Known Member

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    HI Stuboy,

    I'm not of the opinion that you can't bolus for snacks but I think it's a bit ridiculous to tell people that peanuts don't contain carbs when in fact they do.

    I'm seriously thinking about going for the pump though...

    Katie.
     
  9. diabetesmum

    diabetesmum Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Katie,
    My thoughts..... In our experience (2 daughters pumping), having a pump is about much more than 'just' (!) BG readings. It really improves quality of life, it's so much more flexible and adaptable to everyday living. A few examples, it's much easier to dial up a bolus than inject when you're in a restaurant, or in the car or wherever....; it means one needle every 2 or 3 days instead of 4 or 5 needles every day; not having to get up in the early hours to wee because BG's have gone up due to dawn phenomenon.
    To answer your question about low carb, neither of my girls do it consistently, though when they do it works very well. I would be a bit careful about talking about the low carb thing too loudly in clinic, or about getting your HbA1C really low, or they might just decide you don't need a pump anymore!! :shock:
    All the best
    Sue
     
  10. scottishkate

    scottishkate · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Sue :D

    And good advice to keep quiet until I get the pump attached to me!

    Katie
     
  11. Katharine

    Katharine · Well-Known Member

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    That is a good idea. Act as if you are really struggling ! It will be a lot harder for them to justify taking you off it than to justify not putting you on it. :lol:
     
  12. Stuboy

    Stuboy · Well-Known Member

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    I agree! Perhaps i misunderstood or mistook your first post :)
     
  13. pumpinpatsy

    pumpinpatsy Type 2 · Member

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    Hi, I'm a pumper and my HBA1C is 5.0 - I am so much better controlled its fantastic. However, I'm not low-carbing (but being 18 weeks pregnant is my excuse lol). It really is a wonderful thing the pump, and my HBA1C is down to being able to refine my basals so well.
     
  14. cally

    cally Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I use a pump and have recently been trying to cut down my carbs. I am now having around 15g at breakfast , 25g at lunch and 35g at dinner with the odd 10 snack and I was having anything up to 250g of carbs a day before.

    I do find my blood s are much more stable on lower carbs, and I know us type 1's are supposed to be able to eat what we like and bolus for it, but have come to the conclusion that I can't do it.

    So I avoid rice, pasta, pizza, potatoes and too much bread and feel far better without them. But I don't avoid carbs altogether. I do eat loads of fruit and veggies and the odd biscuit or couple of squares of dark chocolate.

    Once you have worked out what to eat instead of rice, pasta etc... Its easy.
     
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