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Medical alert systems

Discussion in 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say' started by Kerri5981, Jul 23, 2019.

  1. Kerri5981

    Kerri5981 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I am looking into medical alert bracelets/keyrings, etc.
    I would love to hear from people who have used the versions that either have a chip or QR style code.
    I need something that would give a doctor/paramedic the correct and most updated medical information if I am ever not able to myself.
    I have heard of a few but personal experience is always better than some review on a website and it would greatly help me choose.

    Thanks guys x
     
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  2. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    Speaking from my hands-on experience as a volunteer community first responder and trainee paramedic - you’d be best off having something engraved and worn around your wrist, as it would be seen very early on, when they take a pulse. A BG is also taken as part of the initial examination, along with blood pressure, temp, oxygen levels... As a type one myself I’ve asked my colleagues in the ambulance service for advice on this for my own needs.

    Personally, I have a variety of ID, depending on what I’m doing. When I’m on duty and can’t wear anything on my wrist, I wear engraved dog tags. If I’m wearing jewellery, I have a plain silver bangle with a bright red disc, stating I am T1 and have an Omnipod pump, as they are small and easily missed - and a fingertip blood test wouldn’t necessarily indicate diabetes. I also have a dog tag on my keyring, and one on my RileyLink (the device that communicates with my pump and glucose sensor) to say it’s an essential medical device and must be kept on my person. The lock screen on my phone says I am T1 and using a pump.

    If you’re found unconscious, all these things will help the emergency services put together a jigsaw of what has happened, so they can give the appropriate treatment - but at present ambulances don’t carry scanners for chips that I’m aware of. And a QR code wouldn’t be much use if you’re in need of rescue somewhere there is no internet signal. Simple is usually best.
     
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  3. Kerri5981

    Kerri5981 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    That's helpful up to a point, thanks.
    I obviously know I need some kind of bracelet/tag but I am still waiting after 3 years to receive the "welcome pack" I was promised when I joined!
     
  4. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    Tbh I didn’t bother with one for almost two decades, because I always had pens or test strips in my pockets. But now I have a pump that’s so discreet I regularly forget where on my body I’ve put it, and a sensor I scan with my phone, it’s not at all obvious that I’m diabetic - and my levels are pretty normal so that wouldn’t highlight it either. And without a long acting insulin in my system, if my pump wasn’t spotted and runs dry or falls/gets knocked off, I could be in DKA very quickly. Plus I travel a lot on my own, so it makes sense. If I’m out with people I often don’t wear any at all.
     
  5. Kerri5981

    Kerri5981 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah see normally I'm with people and have my kit with me but I nearly had a bad hypo the other week ans was on my own so it kinda scared me.
    Thank you
     
  6. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    You can get silicone bands quite cheaply, as I say, I just use a pet tag on a bangle as it can be replaced or updated cheaply. Mine literally just says T1 diabetes on one side and “Omnipod insulin pump NOVORAPID” on the other. That’s all that’s needed in an emergency.
     
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  7. Kerri5981

    Kerri5981 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I have other health issues as well and my list of medication is huge so was thinking of something a little more........
     
  8. Fndwheelie

    Fndwheelie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Kerri5981 if you have multiple diagnosis and medications that can change often it maybe better for you to have a couple of NOK contact numbers rather than trying to tell everything on one small piece of jewellery.
     
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  9. Kerri5981

    Kerri5981 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    ?????
    NOK?????
    Thats why I'm asking about electronic versions
     
  10. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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  11. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    Other things you can do:

    To keep an up to date copy of your full prescription in your purse and wear a tag to say it’s there, as well as what your primary health issues are.

    A tag with your name, address, hospital number, dob and emergency contact.

    Get a dedicated plastic container from the pharmacy to keep in your fridge/car/wherever that lists all your conditions, specialists and meds on a preprinted form.

    There ain’t any one “approved” system for this stuff - it’s a case of working out what will work for you and your own situation, I’m afraid.
     
  12. Kerri5981

    Kerri5981 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    thank you
    nok is all well and good but how do I tell any one the number if I'm unconscious lol
    Seriously i just want advice from people who have actually used one of the electronic systems :banghead:
    You have been helpful but I have my reasons for looking into it and thats why I asked
     
  13. Fndwheelie

    Fndwheelie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Kerri, NOK is next of kin. I’m not sure electronic versions will be a whole load of help. I have a lot of information on my phone under medical ID, I get picked up by the paramedics quite frequently for other conditions, and when I come round I show them my phone, my communication cards, and medipac with my hospital passport. In my opinion if your unconscious they don’t tend to look for things they just treat what they see in front of them.
     
  14. Kerri5981

    Kerri5981 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I don't have a regular up to date prescription as some meds have not been used for a while but I still use occasionally and other newer drugs have still not been added.
    I don't drive and am fed up taking a suitcase out instead of a handbag when I just wanna nip to the shops for example or god forbid a night out!
     
  15. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    It’s a standard abbreviation along with ICE (in case of emergency). I have mine engraved on my tag.

    You’re asking for advice on these electronic systems and I’m telling you that they are rarely checked and can’t be relied upon.
     
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  16. Kerri5981

    Kerri5981 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    EXACTLY! If I am not in a fit state to talk then |I would like some advice on any of the electronic/computer/internet systems that I can access- with a id bracelet/keyring/tattoo even!
     
  17. Kerri5981

    Kerri5981 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    My son was in hospital a couple of weeks ago and all the nurses were using barcode scanners of some sort so out here they are used
     
  18. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Master

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    I wear an SOS talisman on a chain around my neck. It is a waterproof locket which contains a paper strip inside. You can write all your own details on it. Name, address, date of birth, next of kin, medical conditions, medications, allergies etc...
    I know it’s not electronic but it’s simple and I have control of the info it contains, so I can change it as and when necessary.
     
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  19. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    That’s internal hospital paperwork. They print off a sheet of labels on admission and they are used on all your papers, meds, wristband etc. It’s so they know they have the right patient.
     
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  20. Kerri5981

    Kerri5981 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    One nurse looked something up on the internet on hers
     
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