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Medtronic versus Omnipod

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by MeganTetley, Dec 17, 2018.

  1. MeganTetley

    MeganTetley Type 1 · Member

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    Hi guys,
    I am in the process of upgrading my insulin pump on the NHS and of the list of pump potions I have narrowed my choices between the omnipod and the Medtronic 640G.
    I wondered if anyone had been on either of these and had some reviews for me, I am unsure which would be better.

    Also, the medtronic website seems to indicate some kind of CGM system working alongside it, can anyone that's used it confirm this? And explain to me a bit how it all works

    Thank you so much!
     
  2. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    The two main differences between the two are:
    1. Omnipod is tubeless, has only one cannula type (45 degree insertion) and you must change the pod every three days. If you don't it screams at you.
    2. Medtronic is a more traditional pump with integrated CGM and Predictive Low Glucose Suspend. It uses the MDT Enlite system and will stop the pump from delivering basal when it thinks you will go low in the next 30 mins. You will most likely have to pay for this yourself though, as you have to be severely hypo unaware for the NHS to pay. @dancer can tell you more. There are a range of cannulas available.
     
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  3. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think the Medtronic 670G is soon to be available which works with CGM to automatically adjust and administer insulin based on glucose levels. Don't think that's possible on the 640G.
     
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  4. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    It will be, but most people will have to pay for their own CGM to use that feature, which costs ~£200 per month.
     
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  5. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    It does, but you can’t set it below 6.7mmol which is waaaaay too high for me.
     
  6. Muneeb

    Muneeb Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Really, I didn't know that!
     
  7. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @MeganTetley I use the 640g and have found it to be a great pump, customer service is excellent, the tubing isn't really an issue as you can get short cannula sets which are 30cms long and tuck in a pump belt if required, most features are the same on both but if you did want to go down the CGM route then the 640g would be ideal. Look up youtube vids for user reviews as then you can see how others cope with set changes etc.

    @Mel dCP I didn't know about the 6.7 threshold, that's not great, however can see why as they are being over cautious but sort of rules out the idea of really tightening control.
     
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  8. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    Yeah, a lot of my type one grit US friends have been talking about that. It’s 120mg/dl in American, and they all aim for low 80s, around 4.6mmol.
     
  9. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Let's just be clear here though, and extrapolate data from the NDA (and previous NDAs). 30% of PWT1D in the UK and US have Hba1C levels below 7.5%. ~5% have levels below 6.5%.

    In other words, this isn't aimed at people with tight management. It's aimed at people who have levels that are not considered long term safe. If it worked and maintained a 6.7 mmol/l average glucose level, then you'd see people with 40 mmol/mol Hba1Cs. We know that's not going to happen, but if you can bring people with an average of 8% or higher down to 7% then you're making a huge impact on long term complications.

    Like those of us who use the DIY closed loop systems, where there is a wide variance of outcomes on the Hba1C level, but you get there without having to do anything like as much thinking, it's very dependent on what you want out of a system. For many a 7% would be brilliant. (And for some of us, low eighties as a target level for glucose just doesn't work, because with the best will in the world, even when keto adapted, we still have issues with insulin and exercise).
     
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  10. MeganTetley

    MeganTetley Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you so much!
     
  11. MicheleJC

    MicheleJC Type 1 · Member

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    I too am comparing medtronic 640 with omnipods. Apparently pods can now be worn in other places than the arm, and are not as large as they used to be. I would like to know which sites are best to view ones we can get on nhs in the UK?
     
  12. sleepster

    sleepster Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @MicheleJC it depends on your hospital/CCG and what they will fund
     
  13. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    The Omnipod helpline is 0800 011 6132 and they’ll send you a dummy pod to try out wearing to see how you get on. I rarely put one on my arm and stick to midriff and legs.
     
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  14. Maquie

    Maquie · Newbie

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    I use the medtronics pump. I been using it for almost 3 years now. My A1C used to be 13 for years, since using the pump dropped to 7 and my last exam was 6.
     
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