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Type 1 Moving to Australia on a TSS

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by KateMeg, May 15, 2018.

  1. KateMeg

    KateMeg Type 1 · Member

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    Hello forum!

    I have just been offered a job with a TSS visa (i think originally called a 457) to live and work in Australia. I'm trying to research how expensive it will be for me to obtain insulin and pump supplies out there, and also if i will need an assessment before i go. Does anyone know how the system works? Do i need to get health insurance?

    My hba1c is currently at 7.3 and i'm worried that because it is over 7 it will stop me getting the visa! Has anyone gone through the process?
     
  2. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Hello KateMeg - We have several members in Australia, although less likely to be online at this time of their day.

    Do you know where you will be going in Aus yet?
     
  3. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    These two links will give you a idea what is required for that class of visa.

    https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/trav/visa-1/482-
    https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/trav/visa/heal/meeting-the-health-requirement

    Private health insurance will be a must, as on some visas you do not get any health benefits, I not sure about whether that applies to that one you are applying for.

    Joining the NDSS will help with subsidised pump parts, strips etc.

    https://www.ndss.com.au/

    As for prescriptions, you may have to pay full price, although it says you may be covered by health insurance at this link from Diabetes Queensland.

    https://www.diabetesqld.org.au/medi...uts-of-private-health-cover-and-diabetes.aspx

    Also as there is reciprocal agreement between the UK and Australia you should be alright, it mentions a bit about visa restrictions down the bottom the page.

    https://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/visiting-or-moving-to-australia

    Discount medication prices with a GP script at my pharmacy.

    https://assets.bloomsthechemist.com.../03225446/APRIL-2018-PRESCRIPTION-PRICING.pdf

    I cannot think of any other links that may help you.
     
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  4. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

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    Where you are moving to will also factor into the equation. Private insurance is a must so get that done first

    @Tipetoo gave invaluable advice ... and ask if your employer about support as it's worth the effort and research if they (and you) can work on changing the visa if you wish to stay

    I'm married to an American and familiar to many local rules. Getting here is a lot easier than getting there

    Good luck :)
     
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  5. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  6. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If you're covered by medicare (the public system) which you may be because of the UK's reciprocal agreement, then you should be fine. I would definitely ask your employer about this. Private health insurance tend to have qualifying periods and though they do pay for pumps they don't pay for much else. (I'm not on a pump, and though I was in Australia for 17 years I never used my private health insurance for anything other than physio treatment and glasses and a tax break. They didn't cover me for any of my diabetes care.)
    As a priority, find out whether you're covered by medicare.
     
  7. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    As others have said reciprocal UK-Oz arrangement is ideal. There is Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme(PBS) here in Oz is tied in with Medicare, our version of your NHS. (although there are some distinct differences as described below.) PBS reduces costs considerably for commonly prescribed medications e.g. Novorapid i use for my insulin pump - i have pen cartridges prescribed - for 5 packets of 5 cartridges at 300 units per cartridge is AUD 36 ( full price without PBS = AUD 410.) Insulin pumps are a little in flux. Medtronic and Roche are currently supplying but Animas is leaving the pump market and being replaced gradually by Tandem as Animas pump warranties run out over next 2 years or so. There are the only pump companies approved by Govt to sell and supply pumps, parts and servicing of pumps here. NDSS, National Diabete Supply Scheme is also available under reciprocal arrangment and provides testing strips, syringes and cartridge/reservoirs and needle insert pump supplies at reduced cost. Diabetics under age 21 receive rebates for CGM supplies but not others. So a box of 100 glucose testing strips cost me AUD 17, the same for a box of ten reservoirs/cartridges and same again for 10 needle inserts. Private health insurance obtained in Australia does not cover anyone with 'pre-existing conditions' like your diabetes for the first year on that insurance. Some tables of insurance you can apply for will help (after the first year) to cover some pharmacy costs over about AUD 60. Private health insurance once you qualify regarding your diabetes does offer some rebates on new pumps. The amount varies from company to company. The Govt have a Medicare system for pump supply but the waiting list is long and number of new pumps supplied is limited. See what medical insurance you might be able to obtain in UK for Oz. In Oz we pay for GP visits and then are reimbursed some or all of the cost through Medicare. It depends on what the GP charges. But a Medicare rebate of about AUD 35 applies for a standard 20 to 35 minute GP consultation. You may be charged that fee but often more e.g. AUD 60. We also may pay over the Medicare rate for pathology and imaging although some do charge Medicare rate ( called bulk-billing). As per most public health systems there are hospital clinics for diabetics including for eye problems etc. Specialists in private practice are partially covered by medicare rebates but like GPs few bulk bill. Under Medicare, GPs can arrange Diabetes Care Plans which provide rebates for a total of 5 visits to a mix of allied health professionals such as diabetes nurse educators, psychologists, dietitian, podiatrist etc.( Most accept Medicare rates of service but not all, for example a psychology consult may leave you AUD 30 to 40 out of pocket). Medicare does not cover dental fees unless you are in a disadvantaged group. I would suggest you try to get any urgent or semi-urgent dental care done in UK before you leave. Private health insurance in Oz under some tables of insurance provides limited dental rebates.
    Cost of living varies from State to State and capital to capital. Sydney is most expensive then Melbourne, Brisbane. Canberra can also be expensive due to rental shortages and the cold climate through winter.. Other capitals such as Adelaide (were i live), Perth, Hobart, Northern Territory much less so. If your employer provides some rental assistance that would make your life less stressful !!
    I hope the above does not put you off coming to Australia. Canberra is a cold place in winter, Hobart less so. Most other places have warmer summers and winters than the UK and all capitals except Canberra are near the sea. The lifestyle is generally laid back. Please do not hesitate to message me when you arrive bus pm or before for further advice particularly if you are going to be working in Adelaide or Canberra (where I have relatives). My experience of visiting doctors and the lab standards regarding HBA1C is that 7 or below is desirable. The criteria for going on an insulin pump is that control is impaired to the point of being above 7.5. I cannot advise you on exactly what the immigration medical standards are but the above suggests that a HBA1C of 7.3 is not too bad at all. One can of course put forward that the whole process of arranging to move to Oz is stressful and that one would expect that less then ideal control is likely. For driving in OZ the main emphasis is on control regarding absence or low incidence of hypos, particularly severe ones.
     
    #7 kitedoc, May 19, 2018 at 2:26 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: May 19, 2018
  8. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

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    One other critical factor ... take out an ambulance subscription (minimal bucks) and should anything befall you, the costs are zero for all road and air transport. Without it, it can be in the thousands
     
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  9. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    It's definitely a must have, surprising the amount of people that caught short with out cover.
     
  10. Skippy1

    Skippy1 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Make sure that dental cover is included too - a broken tooth led to a bill of over 1000 AUD (surgery visits, x-rays, anaesthetist fee, extraction, drugs, recovery room costs ...) - this had to be paid upfront. Medicare covered some of the emergency costs but I could only claim a fraction back on my insurance.
     
  11. KateMeg

    KateMeg Type 1 · Member

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    This is all so useful and so reassuring, thank you so much!
     
  12. KateMeg

    KateMeg Type 1 · Member

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    This is all so useful, thank you so much. I will drop you a PM if that's ok?
     
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