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Moving to the Opposite Side of the World

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Listlad, Jun 2, 2019.

  1. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Recently there was a thread on the topic of “Diabetic moving to Australia”. I raised a genuine question on how this might effect the individual’s dawn phenomenon. However the post was removed. The question still remains, if a diabetic were to move to the U.K. from down under or vice versa presumably at some point the dawn phenomenon occurrence would flip by approximately 12 hours. Or would it? And if so, surely a consideration for anyone making such a move?
     
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    #1 Listlad, Jun 2, 2019 at 12:15 AM
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2019
  2. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I think it’s more like jet lag adjustment and as your biorhythms adjust to the new circadian rhythm so would the dp along with everything else hormonal. I always found UK to Australia harder than coming back to the UK to adjust to.
     
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  3. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    If you are on Australian EST your dawn phenomena will be on local time not ten hours behind on UK GMT.

    I have never really had a problem with a liver dump as I keep strange hours.
     
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  4. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    No difference once you acclimatise, BUT the food will be one massive change, ergo, the readings
     
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  5. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Simple as that then? I have been over that way a few times but many years ago. But wondered if it might take some time for the dawn phenomenon to flip round.
     
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  6. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    You mean Low Carb spuds?
     
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  7. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Spud Lites are my favourite taters, just like Herman Brot low carb bread, no dawn phenomena with them.
     
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  8. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    No, the entire spread. Radically different in so many ways and even based on where you're at.
     
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  9. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I reckon the circadian rythums will take some weeks to settle into a new pattern.so it is possible that in that changeover bsls coukd be quite unstable and to add to that the switchover will create some stress to add to the issues with control.
    Way back when i did stints of night duty, i had to swop my breakfast to dinner, and vica versa plus lunch at midnight and dosing of insulin to match.
    I feel for shift workers on insulin. Yes maybe cgm, pumps etc these days make it easier but the stress of shifting day to night shift and back again is still a stress.
    I agree with @Mike D, getting used to local foods could be a challenge and climate, too.
    And how will one manage to understand Strine¿
     
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  10. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    I get jet lagged flying across to Perth / Geraldton from Bundy, that two hour time zone change really knocks my beer drinking rhythm out of wack.

    @Listlad might have a bit of trouble with a pie floater though...
     
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  11. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No. As others have said, dawn phenomenon is biochemically linked to the circadian rhythm, not the cosmos.
     
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  12. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    My circadian rhythms were way out of sync for years. So much so that I have never had jet lag. I didn't have much of a DP until the last year or so. So I assume that the fact that I get DP now is a good thing. I reckon I will get jet lag when I go to Oz next time too.
     
  13. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I have never been on a long haul flight, so I can't comment about jet lag. But being Insulin dependent, i'm sure, it would take a while longer to for the switch over. to settle down.
    I would love to go to Australia, if, I had the money and they shifted the country a little bit closer to the UK ;):D
     
  14. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I have actually visited the Southern Hemisphere (Angola) but the time zone is pretty close to that of the U.K.
    so any impact on dawn phenomenon must simply relate to crossing a large number of time zones.
     
    #14 Listlad, Jun 2, 2019 at 8:26 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 2, 2019
  15. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Need to get someone to lassoo it and tow it over this way a bit.
     
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  16. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    This really answers my query. Thanks.
     
  17. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It is not really a dawn phenomenon but a waking phenomenon, so when your body adjusts to waking at the right time the BG rise should follow.
     
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  18. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Food between UK and aus really not so different. Different brand names is about all and a few individual dishes.
     
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  19. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    LOL I just looked that up.

    “In the mid '60s an Australian writer Alistair Morison wrote a book under the pseudonym Afferbeck Lauder (alphabetical order) called "Let Stork Strine" (Let's talk Australian) which became popular for a while ...”
     
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  20. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    I bow to your infinite wisdom
     
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