1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Net Carbs or not?

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by PurpleCloud, Sep 13, 2015.

  1. PurpleCloud

    PurpleCloud Type 2 · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Hi, new to the forum and would really be grateful for some advice please. After a couple of years of struggling with my BS control on tablets, I've finally been re-diagnosed as LADA/type 1.5 and put on insulin. I have also decided to give low carbing a try but would like to know whether I am best counting net carbs or total carbs please. I've read several conflicting articles so advice from experienced low carbers would be much appreciated!
     
  2. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Well-Known Member
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    4,962
    Likes Received:
    3,602
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Personally, I've only ever worked with total carbohydrates - don't know if others here do anything different.

    Welcom to the forums @PurpleCloud
     
  3. vintageutopia

    vintageutopia Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    401
    Likes Received:
    868
    Trophy Points:
    133
    If you are in the UK, you may find it easier to count total carbs, as the fiber is not figured into the total carb count.

    If you are in the US (like me), I count net carbs, since our fiber is not figured into the total carb count.
     
  4. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,545
    Likes Received:
    6,350
    Trophy Points:
    178
    As far as I know, total carbohydrates on UK food labelling is already net carbs as the fibre is listed separately, i.e. is not counted in the 'total carbohydrate' amount. It works differently for USA labelling.
     
  5. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,312
    Likes Received:
    16,107
    Trophy Points:
    198
    it's crazy but US net carbs (you deduct the fibre) = UK total carbs (fibre is counted separately), so as Indy51 and vintageutopia have said fibre content is treated differently in the two countries.

    I'm in the UK so I work with total carbs, but you'll use the method of counting according to where you live. The only time you may need to be aware of the alternative method is if you are looking at dietary information internationally.

    Robbity
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. Celeriac

    Celeriac Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,065
    Likes Received:
    2,192
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Or if you use an American food or product recipe. However, when using recipes from other countries, do bear in mind that any carb numbers given are worked out using their measurements.

    A tablespoon in UK is 25ml, in Australia it's 20ml. An American tablespoon is 0.83 converted into British tablespoons, i.e. a British tablespoon is bigger.

    American and Australian cups aren't the same either. Australian ones are smaller.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,312
    Likes Received:
    16,107
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Yes, possibly even more important this one!

    Robbity
     
  8. vintageutopia

    vintageutopia Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    401
    Likes Received:
    868
    Trophy Points:
    133
    I did not realize that it varied so much.
     
  9. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,780
    Likes Received:
    7,400
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I thought a UK tablespoon was approx 15ml, as its three teaspoons with each teaspoon being 5ml?
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. Celeriac

    Celeriac Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,065
    Likes Received:
    2,192
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I used a specialist culinary website. The UK has a standard teaspoon measure, but no standard teaspoon size.

    As a former chef, I don't follow recipes much, I just use them for inspiration. However, if you're tracking carbs on a diet tracker, accuracy helps.

    I have a full set of cups measures which I brought back from Canada, because although it's metric, many people do use US cooking measures. You can buy them in the UK more easily now. Australian cups are smaller than US ones.
     
  11. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,780
    Likes Received:
    7,400
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Thanks for replying :) Strange about the tablespoon not having a standard size o_O

    I have both measuring spoons and cups, but haven't a clue what country my cups are supposed to be from! I shall do some measuring!
     
  12. msmi1970

    msmi1970 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    382
    Likes Received:
    1,425
    Trophy Points:
    158
    just to add..if possible, eat to your meter. some foods that i like, despite being relatively low in carbs does not provide an immediate spike but invariably my fasting blood glucose the following day will be a tad higher..my kryptonite is nuts..:(
     
  13. Celeriac

    Celeriac Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,065
    Likes Received:
    2,192
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Azure, you're welcome . Measurements derived from people cooking, so they would write their recipe down for friends and stipulate a teaspoon, a cup etc and the measure was standardised only when populations got bigger and cookbooks became a thing. In the UK we didn't even have a whole country time zone before railways, so measurements, time zones and much more were regional.

    I collect old cook books and will find they call for say a moderately hot oven. People knew what that meant, in the days when they didn't have temperature control. So in recipe books from the 50s and 60s, cookbooks often started with a conversion chart to fahrenheit. Just as in the 70s cookbooks began converting fahrenheit to centigrade and pints to litres.

    In the end, I find that trial and error is often better than trying to convert measurements !
     
  14. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,312
    Likes Received:
    16,107
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Me too - that's what I've been working with....:wideyed:

    Robbity
     
  15. mortiferum

    mortiferum Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Helpful hint...if you're not sure if you're looking at a UK or US product, pay attention to how Fibre (UK) / Fiber (US) is spelt.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook