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New and confused

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Vickileigh, May 9, 2020.

  1. Vickileigh

    Vickileigh Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi all,
    I’m sorry if I’m repeating what others have said/asked, but I was newly diagnosed over the telephone by my GP on Thursday 7 May 2020. After feeling tired and having bloods tested he telephoned and said I had type 2 diabetes, then started throwing numbers at me (of which I don’t understand) saying my readings were 76 and he was starting me on a drug called metformin.
    He also said that there was educational things I could go on but because of pandemic they weren’t going at the moment
    My head is a mess, I have tried reading stuff on the web but I just don’t understand it all
     
    • Hug Hug x 5
  2. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
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    Hi @Vickileigh and welcome to the forum

    It is a difficult time when first diagnosed, but you have found the right place for help and support.

    This link would be a good starting point: https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/basic-information-for-newly-diagnosed-diabetics.17088/ have a good read and ask as many questions as you like.

    It sounds like the 76 is your HbA1c, which is an average of your blood glucose levels over a 2-3 month period. It’s a little high as the threshold for diabetes diagnosis in the UK is 48, but many of us here have successfully brought similar or higher HbA1c numbers down into non-diabetic ranges by adjusting what we eat. The key is to reduce carbohydrates in your diet.

    Take a look at dietdoctor.com for ideas and information.

    Good luck and keep us posted!
     
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  3. Vickileigh

    Vickileigh Type 2 · Newbie

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  4. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    You've been hit by a ton of bricks, don't be surprised if it all goes over your head for a bit... It's a lot to take in, and even if it wasn't, there's so much conflicting advice on the web, it's hard to get a straight answer. This is everything I wish someone'd told me when I was just diagnosed, as simply put as I could make it, exactly because it is sooo much to wrap your head around right at the start: https://josekalsbeek.blogspot.com/2019/11/the-nutritional-thingy.html

    Bottom line though, this isn't a death sentence, it's not 100% sure you'll get complications and whatnot... This is a condition you have a say in. There's hope here. I have had normal bloodsugars for almost as long as I've been diagnosed. Took me about 3 months to get the hang of the low carb thing and experimented my way through (I didn't find this forum until much later, otherwise it would've gone a lot quicker!), but it means no complications, no medication, so yeah.... It can be done. Not just me either, there's a LOT of people here who've managed it.

    You can too.
    Good luck,
    Jo
     
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    #4 JoKalsbeek, May 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM
    Last edited: May 9, 2020
  5. Vickileigh

    Vickileigh Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thank you very much
     
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  6. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    It is a bombshell when first diagnosed. We have all been there, but it doesn't take long for the shock to dispel and to understand what everything means..

    You have received plenty of excellent information above. One thing I will add is it would help you enormously if you buy your own blood glucose meter. It will become your best friend. You will be able to check what each of your chosen meals does to your blood glucose levels, giving you chance to analyse the contents of the meal, change the portion sizes of certain foods or discard them completely.
     
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  7. Jus455

    Jus455 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I'm kind of new here too. Trying to absorb everything, the information is overwhelming
     
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  8. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    hello and welcome,

    As others have said it is very overwhelming when first diagnosed. I remember thinking that I'd never get my head around it. I think I cried every day for at least 2 weeks. But it does get better.

    You have found the best place for diabetics to get information, support and advice. I wouldn't really worry about the other educational things as my suspicion is that they would be less than helpful.

    My first bit of advice- read around on here- there is a heap of useful information. Both @Goonergal and @JoKalsbeek have posted really useful links.

    The next thing to do is to get a meter. The meter is the thing that will let you know the effect different foods have on your blood sugar levels.

    I went really low carb straight away. I'm still under 20 grams- maybe a bit closer to 20 grams than I used to be. I found it easier to just eat food with no or very little carbs- meat, fish, hard cheese, cream that sort of thing. I found it easier not to have to weigh food at all. There is other stuff- cauliflower is a particularly versatile vegetable.

    Read around and ask questions- there are some amazing and friendly people here-Good luck and welcome.
     
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  9. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    New and confused, but soon to be new and improved!
     
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  10. vera57

    vera57 · Member

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    Thank you the advice is reAlly helpful and great fully appreciated and received. I have ordered myself a meter today so will use it as mentioned in the advice given. X this group is really amazing
     
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  11. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Hang around with us too long and you'll end up knowing as much if not more than the majority of doctors..
     
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  12. DCB 2

    DCB 2 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Vickie !!!!!!

    Greetings from across the pond. I understand how it was when I first diagnosed as a type 2. I was so scared and angry I could barely think. Many people have given a lot of good advice. The only I would add is that you keep a daily journal of your blood sugars so you can see trends. I would recommend 1st thing in the morning and 2 hours after a meal. One thing exercising has helped me a great deal. It could be simple as taking a hour walk in the evening.

    Just take things a day at a time. You are learning a lot of new things and you will make some mistakes. Don't worry we have all made mistakes with blood sugar, it is part of the process.

    I hope this was helpful and good luck !!!!!

    Dave
     
  13. RobHockel

    RobHockel Type 2 · Newbie

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    I can fully understand how confused you must feel. Lots of information to absorb.It will take time to process all.

    Here 4 easy things i wished I would have done immediately after my diagnosis.
    1) take the meds the doctor has prescribed
    2) A bit more exercise with something that gets the heart going - no gym required, just a fast walk or just jog if you can
    3) Less carbs - more green stuff
    4) Buy 2 freestyle libre sensors, or similar. (continuous glucose monitor) - expensive with about GBP 50 each (might get this as a prescription if you’re lucky but i wouldn’t wait) its so easy to use and will give you great information about the impact of your exercise and eating habits. check the site - you might not need a reader if your smartphone is not too old)

    Try this for a month while you absorb all the youtube videos you can find ;-)
     
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