1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

New User- Ready to give up

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by Dublindiabetic, Feb 15, 2018.

  1. Chas C

    Chas C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    812
    Likes Received:
    440
    Trophy Points:
    123
    I had same thoughts as you, it put me off pumping for about 5 years until in the end I just could not control the dawn issues with BG's. I keep my pump in my shirt pocket, no one notices it. I did once get asked when adjusting manually why I was using a pager :).

    For sports I use a necktie with the pump in middle of my chest, I've also used an arm band too but not often.
     
  2. Dublindiabetic

    Dublindiabetic · Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Not familiar with the sensor aspect. Do they send readings from your bg meter to pump? Would this remove the need to take pump out of waist pouch/ pocket etc? Or do you need to do this regardless to input by reading, carb count and to start the bolus?
     
  3. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    Do you really mean if someone hands back a pump it gets thrown out?
    That surprises me especially as I noticed the last loaner pump I got for a trip overseas was marked as "Refurbished".
    If they can refurbish pumps, I don't understand why they cannot issue one which has been used for a short period of time to someone else.
    Sure, it is not possible to get back the money spent on training someone to use a pump but that is a small cost compared to the cost of the pump. And that is without considering the cost of the pump supplies which is significant over the life of a pump.

    I was lucky that I, eventually, took to the pump but if I didn't, I would be considering diabetes management over cost when thinking about handing it back/
     
  4. Stefano

    Stefano Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    82
    Trophy Points:
    68
    I use medtronic sensors which interact with the medtronic pump sending readings to the pump every 5 minutes and alarming me (through a threshold I have chosen) every time the bg is below or above a certain limit. In my case I have put 4.4 as low limit and 9 as high one. With the sensors the Medtronic 640g can also suspend your insulin if it expects you’re going to low in the near future.
    As far as bolus you will still have to take the pump out of your pocket!
     
  5. scotteric

    scotteric Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    318
    Likes Received:
    140
    Trophy Points:
    83
    You can see from the comments almost no one regrets getting a pump once they start using it and their only regret is not doing it sooner. You have lots of room to improve your A1C and I think a pump will make it easier for you to do that - if you put the work in. What I found about MDI was that there would be lots of times I was running higher than normal blood sugars and couldn't do anything about it because I would have to take a dose that would drop me low (since pens can only dose in 0.5 or 1 unit) or would have to take an injection around other people which I didn't want to do. You will be much more likely to correct every time you are high, even slightly high, which is a huge advantage the pump has over shots. I highly recommend wearing the sensor as well, it's too hard to know what's going on from just a finger test now and then!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. wendy0804

    wendy0804 Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Hi, I got a pump last August but chose the OMNIPOD which is completely wireless. Pod attached to body, hand held monitor in handbag. Much easier to use than the wire/tubing connections. Don't know if this is unusual to my Health Authority but widely the option of choice via my diabetes nurse. Good luck. It is worth persevering with it.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    8,907
    Likes Received:
    11,769
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Pumps are classified as one use medical devices, and as such cannot be passed on to another user by the hospital. That doesn't stop them being returned to Medtronic who can then refurb them and pass them out again.

    @Dublindiabetic - the other thing to be aware of with the 640G is that the linked blood glucose meter also acts as a remote bolus button, so you can dial up a bolus and administer it. It doesn't have a carb wizard as part of that, but if discretion is an issue, that is always an option.
     
  8. jasonbailey

    jasonbailey Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hi. I've just picked up on this topic. I am a relatively new user of an insulin pump although I did give it a go a couple of years ago and was having the same issues as you. As I said, I've been back on the pump for a month today and I have to say although there are still some teething issues I wouldn't want to go back now to a pen. I'm using the Accuchek Insight and I've purchased a few items that help with the clothing issues you describe i.e. belt holder, garter (I know!!!) for night time - that's so much easier than the pump just hanging off you in bed.

    Stick with it, I am sure it will become second nature.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    425
    Likes Received:
    208
    Trophy Points:
    83
    A few people at work know I have a pump. I was having tea with a few of them. I was being discrete putting in a guestimate of carbs under the table. One said I know what you are doing and it looks suss, do it on the table. Most of the people I work with are frustrated propeller heads (they have been moved into project and management positions). I keep the line tucked in my pocket when in supermarkets etc as there are lots of snagging opportunities. Please give it 3 months with insulin. I had a lot of concerns sleeping with it as I toss and turn. First night I clipped it to my PJ shorts and I slept on it and it was uncomfortable since then I have let it roam free in the bed and no issues at all. On the rare occasion I do get up in the middle of the night I just pick it up even though I'm still pretty much still asleep. Once the pump is adjusted (suggest CGM for the first 4 weeks).
     
  10. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    I use a Hid In pump belt at night which I wrap around my leg twice to wear like a garter rather than purchasing a dedicated one.
    Definitely better for me than letting it roam free on the end of It's tether/tube: left to its own devices it seems to end up (uncomfortably) underneath me.
    And it doesn't want to stay in a pj pocket.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,652
    Likes Received:
    4,079
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I am, hopefully, getting a pump soon. After being T1D for nearly 46 years and over 85,000 injections. The chance of only having 1 cannula insertion every 2/3 days seems like bliss compared to a minimum of 4 jabs per day. I have never been 1 to hide my diabetes and will check my blood and inject anywhere
     
  12. Bud1979

    Bud1979 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    43
    Trophy Points:
    38
    It’s something I’m not bothered about, my pump is usually in my pocket, or suspended from my belt. Why should it bother me ? I make sure I tuck the tube away as much as possible, not because I’m embarrassed but in case it snags, life is complicated enough, get on with it, live large and enjoy it.
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook