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Newly daignosed

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Geeme1971, Jul 1, 2017.

  1. Geeme1971

    Geeme1971 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi there, after feeling a little dizzy, light headed, blurry vision and feeling weak/shaky, I tested my blood sugar levels (last Friday) and the result was 27.3. I looked it up on the internet and the response was that it is way too high. So over the week I have been testing both before and after meals and the results have been ranging from 23 to 14 mmol!
    I went to my GP on Thursday and he put me on Metformin 3 x a day. Yesterday my test was 14.3 before breakfast however after having porridge made with water, coconut oil, a little soyailk and stevia, I waited a couple hours and retested and it was 21 and again today ranging between 21-23! I see most people say it should be below 7 so my figures seem scary to me! I am about 3 stone overweight, eat healthily, am veggie, have PCOS (since I was 16 now 45), walk every day (between 10-15,000 steps) so need help and advise on where next!
    I am seeing the diabetic nurse at my surgery in a couple of weeks so will see what she says. Help!
     
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  2. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi! I'm fairly new to this game but I'll tag in @daisy1 who will provide you with loads of useful info. It's a steep learning curve! I've taken the low carb diet route as recommended by the lovely people here. I too am on Metformin and this combined with the low carb diet has brought my blood sugars down to normal and I've lost over two stone in weight in eight weeks. You could be well be on your way to feeling healthier by the time you see your nurse. Btw I think I've read somewhere that Metformin is good for PCOS too.
     
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  3. Geeme1971

    Geeme1971 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thank you @Rachox yes Metformin is supposed to be good for PcOS too... will persevere and see where the next few weeks take me
     
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  4. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @Geeme1971

    Hello and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask questions when you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 245,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children
     
  5. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    @Geeme1971

    Hi and welcome,

    Yes, your figures are high, and it is probably carbohydrate that is causing it. Eating healthily for the general population is not the same as eating healthily for diabetics. Eating wholemeal products is just as bad as eating white products as far as most of us are concerned.

    Your best plan is to keep a food diary including portion sizes and everything that passes your lips. Test before and 2 hours after first bite then record your levels alongside the food. Look at the rise from before to after. Any more than 2mmol/l is too much and the carbs in the meal need reducing/eliminating. You will see patterns emerging, and have already noticed that porridge oats are not helping you. You may need to change your breakfast and keep away from all breakfast cereals. This way of recording is known as "eating to your meter". If you listen to your meter you will soon learn which foods raise your levels. It is important to remember that each of us has a different tolerance level to different carbs, so you need to find yours.

    The main culprits are cereals, bread, potatoes, rice, pasta and flour. We also need to be careful with fruit and milk.

    I must also warn you that your diabetes nurse is likely to push the NHS Eatwell Plate, and this is not good as it advocates far too many carbs.
     
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  6. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi, welcome :)
     
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  7. Johnjoe13

    Johnjoe13 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Geeme1971 welcome. As @Bluetit1802 has said porridge will push your blood sugar higher so you really do need to think about finding something else. I would have thought they would have prescribed another drug besides the Metformin given how high your numbers were, it may well be they are waiting for your HbA1c. As has been mentioned you really need to use your meter and start cutting the carbs out of your diet or reducing them, you'll be amazed at the results
     
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  8. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I found that porridge gave me a reading of 13 from 6 which was only surpassed by a Morrisons ready made chinese meal at 14 from 5mmol/l
     
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  9. leslie10152

    leslie10152 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum. I know what it is like to have bgl's like that. But don't lose hope just yet. This will improve as you gain experience in diabetes control. I have been doing this for 12 years, and sometimes it is a real trial. You will have good and bad days. Remember we are here to assist.
     
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  10. Hammer1964

    Hammer1964 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Geeme1971, I was diagnosed just over three months ago and my HbA1c was 78 and a finger prick test revealed 22. I was put on Gliclazide 80mg a day, two months later after a couple of hypos the Gliclazide was reduced to 40mg and my HbA1c was 60, so going in the right direction. After three months my HbA1c is 44 and my diabetic nurse wants to change my meds to Metformin. I am also veggie and do not eat meat substitute or fish so here are some of the foods I eat.
    Breakfast - 2 dessert spoons of full fat yogurt, 6 blackberries and a dessert spoon of Lizzie granola or 2 slices of whole grain seeded toast (but bot often) or scrambled eggs, mushrooms, tomatoes and a small amount of beans.
    Lunch - cheese or egg salad, ryvita with cream cheese, or a cheese salad sandwich on wholegrain seeded bread
    Dinner - Cheesey veg, or 40g of brown rice with mushrooms and spinach with cream stirred in and other veg or stir fry with halloumi cheese or omelettes or cheese & onion quiche with veg or salad.
    I find all of these fit in with less than 60g of carbs a day.
    Hope this helps.
     
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  11. AM1874

    AM1874 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @ Geeme1971 .. and welcome
    You have certainly made a good move coming here .. since joining this forum the folks here have given me so much info, advice and support that I am now much more confident about the journey ahead. So ask your questions and be assured that you will receive the answers that you need. It's still early for me but, in my experience, it gets easier .. very quickly.

    Your numbers are high but managing and controlling your diabetes through exercise, diet and testing your Blood Glucose seems to be the best way forward for many people. For me, committing to an LCHF (Low Carb High Fat) lifestyle and testing 3-5 times a day seems to be working and you'll find that there is a wealth of info, relevant advice and positive support about LCHF on the forum ..

    I see thatyou have already received the welcome info from @daisy1 and I suggest that you read up on the Low Carb Program in the information that she has sent you. You might also find the discussion on the Low Carb Diet forum helpful .. and the following Diet Doctor websites ...
    Low Carb Intro and Information
    Low Carbs in 60 Seconds

    Hope this helps
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
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