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No benefit to too tight a control of type1 diabetes?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by ickihun, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. SueJB

    SueJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    • Agree Agree x 2
    #21 SueJB, Oct 11, 2019 at 2:02 PM
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019
  2. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well all I know is you look abut 12 you lucky lady! x
     
  3. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I sometimes wonder if it's just the hba1c test we should be looking at. No mention is made of the other hormones that work (or don't) in tangent with each other, ie one goes up so the other comes down to compensate, one is out of whack so another one adjusts accordingly. I 'worry' that by forcing glucose down artificially low or too low wherever the bar is set (not that we have a choice in our use of insulin obviously) it has an effect on those other hormones, could they also be responsible for this suggested rise in risk of CVD for example.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  4. JAT1

    JAT1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I totally agree. I wonder about the accuracy of the Hba1c in my case. Last test it was less than 4.2%. Measurements below that are not given here. And yet I have had only a couple of hypos since diagnosis on Aug 1 2018 and nothing I couldn't easily deal with by myself. All my readings are between 4 and 10, usually around 6 !! I finger prick. The endo is baffled and just keeps ordering more tests ! But I have had 3 now with under 4.2%. I think it's because I have gone from an extremely high carb diet before diagnosis to slowly working towards lower and lower carb, currently around 40 to 60 per day. The doctor wants to keep testing until she finds something wrong with me. I'm sick of her approach. "Seek and ye shall find." No thanks.
     
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  5. JAT1

    JAT1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If you stick to low carb (never more than 10 carbs every 3 hours, eaten with plenty of fat), so that essentially there is nothing within your control to push your bs up, it's my opinion that finger pricking is enough. I have to pay for all supplies out of my own pocket and with my budget I only measure my bs usually just once a day before bed. (I have a job but life is expensive here and I prefer to spend more on meat than using my last dollar on measuring my bs. Mind you, if I'm battling a cold or feel something "off" like routine exhaustion, I measure more, but the buck always stops somewhere.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  6. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I would guess you've come across some who have the grace to admit that you probably know more about managing your regime than them? I hope so!
     
  7. SueJB

    SueJB Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks @JAT1 but I think you may have slightly missed the point I was trying to make. Monitoring BG at certain times by finger pricking, gives you exactish info on specific times but does not give enough 24hr coverage of time in range.
    Not sure where you live but it must be hard to have to pay for everything. Goodluck
     
  8. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You may be one of those people for whom the hba1c gives an inaccurate result (certain blood conditions, blood cells that live longer or shorter than the standard 3 months, etc). If they are concerned, the could do a back up fructosamine test to see what that says.... (Not sure how it works, but it gives a measure of the last 2-3 weeks of control, typically used for pregnant women where you want to know the most recent history.)
     
  9. Antechinus

    Antechinus Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Around the 29 minute mark of Ivor's interview with Malcolm Kendrick they discuss how high insulin levels in blood are bad for arterial health. Malcolm states that both high sugar and high insulin are bad. Need to get both down.

    My understanding being that while you can manage high glucose intake with greater insulin use, preferably avoiding hypo's, in the long run your better off trying to reduce your insulin use.
     
    #29 Antechinus, Oct 12, 2019 at 11:41 PM
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2019
  10. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’m sorry. That is too simplistic. Many people need high levels of basal insulin. That is not dictated by food. Yes, you can reduce your bolus insulin if you eat less carbs. And that is the point. It is not reducing your insulin, it is reducing the carbs which then require the insulin.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  11. Jim Lahey

    Jim Lahey I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I also read somewhere that, given an equal level of sensitivity, exogenous injections result in higher blood insulin concentrations per x amount of cleared glucose when compared to those who produce insulin in the pancreas. I forget the exact mechanism but I believe it is something to do with the pancreas normally delivering the bulk of insulin directly to the liver rather than it circulating the whole body before it gets there.

    I'm sure it's way more complex than that, though. Insulin doesn't just act alone in the liver, for one thing. I think someone here recently posted a link to a video or online literature that explains it far better than I'm able to.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've wondered what effect c-peptide has on cardiovascular health (or health in general). I assume as T1s without insulin we're also without c-peptide, should we be injecting it with the insulin?
     
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