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Not Waking Up

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by hazedsoundz, Aug 25, 2018.

  1. hazedsoundz

    hazedsoundz Type 1 · Active Member

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    Has anyone else not woken up while has a hypo and seize then wake up with paramedics infront if you?
     
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  2. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I did when I was pregnant and keeping low sugars, Given today's technology, can you afford a cgm and then add an alarm? That would seem the obvious solution for night time lows. And, obviously, be careful with alcohol because it suppresses your liver's ability to rescue from hypos.
     
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  3. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yep, about 20 years back. I had been doing some gardening up until 6 pm, came in for dinner, ate extra carbs but woke up with a cannula in my arm at about 2 am having had glucose intravenously.
    The worst part was that my mother-in-law had come over, I was in a state of partial undress and my wife was holding back a laugh as I had the residue of partly dissolved black jelly beans over my cheeks. Thankfully no-one took a photo !!
     
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  4. Knikki

    Knikki · Guest

    Yes last November, my own stupid fault I ended up in a hypo, but para medics shouting at you and trying to stick canulars in you is not much fun.

    But still have the greatest respect for them.
     
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  5. kev-w

    kev-w Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Not for a long time but a few times in my early days, I've woken up in A&E too on a drip, good people Paramedics :)
     
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  6. evilclive

    evilclive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've woken up rather too many times with my wife looking at me having given me the glucagon. A few of the early times this was accompanied by little green men (paramedics), but mostly just my wife handling it these days.

    I've also had two fits while I've been alone, and woken up with a swollen tongue and a nasty headache.

    (all of this while sleeping)

    The libre blucon based alarm is working - not had a problem since then.
     
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  7. hazedsoundz

    hazedsoundz Type 1 · Active Member

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    Very true. I’m grateful my dad can afford to pay for my cgm, it’s truely a life saver
     
  8. hazedsoundz

    hazedsoundz Type 1 · Active Member

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    Wow so was that glucagon? Cuz I woke up and I was so confused I thought they were police cuz the glucagon took a few minutes to wake me up and gain consciousness again t my situation was kinda good in a way then cuz I didn’t feel the canular or whatever but still woke up
     
  9. hazedsoundz

    hazedsoundz Type 1 · Active Member

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    Has your mindset changed in regards to diabetes as the years have passed that you’ve had it? Wondering because I’m only 3 years in
     
  10. hazedsoundz

    hazedsoundz Type 1 · Active Member

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    What happened while u were alone? You just woke up sweating and all that?
     
  11. Knikki

    Knikki · Guest

    Not sure what they were trying to use, some sort of sugary drip thing, of which it was a large bag of which it took them nearly 2 hours to get me back too any sense of normal.

    But even in my "totally out of it state" I was aware of the canular and was trying to pull it out, but my other half stopped me. :) just as well really.

    Do remember asking them if they had a busy night, and would they like cup of tea :hilarious:
     
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  12. kev-w

    kev-w Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'd say my 'tolerance' of hypos has changed over the years, and I'd imagine that's due partly to the better insulins we use today and digital test meters, at 3 years in I could frequently sleep thru a hypo for a couple of hours and wake in a sweat soaked bed whereas it's a rarity these days, I guess your mind set changes out of necessity :).

    I see it as I'm a T1d, hypos and hypers can and do happen, and as long as I'm trying my best then I can't do any more if I'm trying to stay within the limits, my own view is that hypos are the most likely side effect of close blood glucose management, probably not how Doctor Dickie sees it but each to their own.... :)
     
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  13. evilclive

    evilclive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    The fits? As I said, I woke up with a swollen tongue and a nasty headache. I don't know how long after the fit I woke up, or how long it went on for. I don't recommend it :)

    I'd far rather have woken up sweating, because I'd have been able to catch that and had something to eat.
     
  14. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I know what you mean about little green men. I thought about learning Martian speak but figured that would become untranslatable once in a hypo.
     
  15. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Scary stuff. My sister in law's cousin died in his sleep from what was confirmed later to be a diabetic hypo. It happened around the same time as I was diagnosed last year and she kept it to herself to avoid worrying me (even more than I already was). She only told me a few months ago - has worried my hubbie though because he didn't realise that was something that could happen.
     
  16. isjoberg

    isjoberg Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's something I have to remind myself that hypos can get serious very quickly! I've been diabetic for over 20 years and often don't treat my small hypos immediately... bad habit I know!
     
  17. maria030660

    maria030660 · Well-Known Member

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    i only woke up once in hospital when my kids were small , in the intensive care as well, real scary. Up till today i haven't got a clue what happened but i remember waking up and a whole team around me. Test devices were not there as we know it but once i received my BG meter i have been testing 5 times aday (when ill even more) so hypo's like that became a thing of the past. Luckily i can feel a hype coming well in advance. I get cold and sticky and cannot stop yawning.
     
  18. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yep has happened a few times. Most recent last year while camping....Went to bed at 11ish with a single figure BG did my basal and woke at around 4am with 2 paramedics over me. I am pretty sure i bolused instead of basaled. Considering I was on 22 units of Lantus at that time. I was pretty lucky
     
  19. johnpol

    johnpol Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have been extremely lucky after 23yrs I have only had one really severe hypo where I didn't know what was happening and came round with the onsite medics around me (I worked in a prison at the time) still don't know to this day what happened or how I got there. Nowadays I have most of my hypos during the night, which is fun when you have to change the bedding due to the sweat, and they can be severe as well. Tried all sorts to get them to stop,
     
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  20. Haslam55

    Haslam55 Type 1 · Member

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    Paramedics needed a couple of times, once they took BS which was high, husband told them to wash my hands as I had been struggling to open Lucozade, retested and it was very low
    When having nightime hypos (no longer a problem since using a pump) always had weird surreal dreams
    Coming round to realisation of what had happened was always the worst for me felt ashamed and guilty
     
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