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Omnipod DASH or another?

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by homer190376, Apr 5, 2022.

  1. homer190376

    homer190376 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi All,

    I'm been diabetic for 23yrs now and recently have had some pretty big complications which really a insulin pump will help with and my consultant agrees.

    Any suggestions on the best one to have, I have been looking at the Omnipod as it is tubeless and seems to be very discreet, can anyone tell me the pros & cons for such a device? i also currently use the freestyle libre 2 which i hope to continue with.

    thank you
     
  2. Soplewis12

    Soplewis12 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hiya, I've been using the omnipod dash for just over a year but this is my first and only pump. I do like it as it is tubeless but don't find it discreet, bit lumpy under clothing.
    I don't wear it on thighs as found it easily caught on jeans/trousers. I tend to wear it either on my stomach or upper arm. Sometimes when on upper arm it can hurt when I am sleeping on that side. I also found during last years hot summer that the glue would stop sticking and pump came off but I bought skin tack wipes which helped.
    Changing to a pump took a lot of adjustments for me as I found that as only using fast acting insulin affected me. Prior to pump sunbathing didn't affect my BG but now plummets, exercise it plummets but saying that it is just about learning your bodies needs & adjusting doses as required. It is worth the change but took me much longer than I expected to get to grips with it. I am 32 years type 1 & it was like being newly diagnosed again. A year on now & I wouldn't go back to pens. Hba1c from 7.0 to 6.5 this year & much less hypos.
    Best of luck!
     
  3. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @homer190376.
    Have you asked your consultant what options are available at your clinic?
    This varies hugely and there is no point researching all pumps until you know what is on offer as you could be disappointed.
    For example, my clinic has decided OmniPod are too expensive and usually only offer Medtronic as they don’t want to train patients and DSNs on multiple pumps.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  4. derivadow

    derivadow Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @homer190376, the Medtrum Nano is an other patch pump option and the one I went for. If it is an option for you, I’m happy to let you know my experience.
     
  5. homer190376

    homer190376 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Please share as I will be talking to my Diabetes Consultant this week, so would a appreciate a little feed back, thanks
     
  6. derivadow

    derivadow Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Some thoughts…

    Positives:
    1. It is tiny, a small ‘footprint’ and low profile is good for the obvious reasons but also means it is easier to find a fresh site (by way of comparison, the pump is a little oblong thing, the long side is about the same as the short side of a omnipod);
    2. I like the redundancy offered by being able to use the PDM (which is also tiny) or phone (not at same time/ same pump);
    3. Being able to control the pump from my phone (one less thing to carry), really like this;
    4. The battery is in the disposable bit of the patch so you don't need to carry around spare batteries / worry about charging it etc.
    5. Generally there is a lot less stuff to carry about (not much more volume vis-a-vis MDI)
    6. Really good customer care and support
    7. Easy to use
    8. All the usual benefits of a pump eg I use temp basal, suspend, different bolus delivery profiles.

    Negatives:
    7. I'm a bit sensitive to the adhesive (now stick it to a patch of Hypafix tape with Rock tape over the top)
    8. I had a duff box (the battery depleted before the end of the pump) but because the customer care is so good it didn't really matter - I had a replacement box within a couple of days.
    9. Like all d-tech there's a lack of data integration so I need to copy data from the Libre into the PDM/ app
    10. The software (web and mobile) could do with a bit of TLC - it is fine, does what it needs to do but just a bit rough around the edges and the reports/ data viz aren't ideal

    Other things of note
    1. Medtrum also sell a CGM which does integrate with the pump - also allows for auto suspend and hybrid closed loop (being trailed at the moment). I’ve no experience of this but can see it all sat there in the interface!

    2. uses a steel cannula - hasn’t caused me any problems (doesn’t hurt, no reaction etc.)

    I would certainly recommend.

    Hope that’s of some help.
     
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    • Informative Informative x 1
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