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Pasta,Rice, Root Veg recommendations

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by jal16, Jan 21, 2016.

  1. Susiespearish

    Susiespearish Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I tried them @Prem51 .Bought in bulk but couldn't stand them .Some people love them so let's hope they do for you :)

    I believe it works with any starchy carbs @LinsT according to the programme !
     
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  2. mo53

    mo53 Type 2 · Expert

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    The other one in the range is sweet potato tagliatelle. I didn't buy this one as it was very high in carbs.
     
  3. MarcoRiveira

    MarcoRiveira Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    #23 MarcoRiveira, Jan 30, 2016 at 4:28 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2016
  4. BooJewels

    BooJewels Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I know that my approach is somewhat different from the hard core low carbers here, but I've also been doing it longer than most and a very strict approach gets hard to maintain for the long haul. Working out a sensible regime is much easier to stick to.

    Please don't feel that diabetes is a lifetime ban on certain foods. Lowering your carb intake absolutely definitely improves your BG numbers, that's indisputable - it's also indisputable that the person that has most impact on your future health is yourself and how you choose to manage your eating and activity in your daily life. But you're not allergic to carbs, your body actually needs them in moderation, but a sensible, maintainable balance is what is required - not a total ban.

    My own very personal approach is that not all carbs are equal - for me there are 3 classes of carbs:

    [1] those that are strictly limited and only very occasional treats - chocolate, cake, biscuits, ice cream, desserts etc.
    [2] known carbs that impact on BG but are taken in measured and controlled portions - potato, pasta, bread, rice etc.
    [3] acceptable carbs that I feel free to eat with impunity - vegetables, fruit, milk, cheese, yogurt etc.

    I feel that foods like fruit and vegetables have other nutritional benefits that outweigh their carb load - they have minerals, vitamins and fibre that are good for us and I would be reluctant to cut these out entirely, just because one might be considered 'high carb'.

    BUT - the very important factor is to work out for yourself what you can get away with and what you can't - we all vary enormously in what raises BG and what doesn't. For example, I can eat a decent sized baked potato with butter and not notice any particular spike, but rice, even in small portions, has much more impact. Pasta is somewhere in the middle. I can eat pineapple without major issue, but strawberries that are supposed to be one of the better fruits for diabetics, sends my numbers rocketing. So I just eat raspberries instead in summer. :woot:

    So you must test what works for you personally and what doesn't - and find a balance that you can still enjoy eating and will be sustainable for the long-term. If you start worrying about never eating a roast potato again, it will simply drive you bonkers. The sky won't fall in if you do occasionally.

    I eat in restaurants so infrequently, that I pretty much eat what I want when I do - you can still make sensible choices and enjoy your meal - a compromise if you like. For example, instead of having steak pie, chunky chips and peas, have a steak with skinny fries and green beans - modest substitutions can knock quite a lot of carbs off without making you feel you're losing out. I calculate those two meals are something like 68g of carb different.

    And you can make subs with your meals too - if I know I'm going out for a meal (I wish) in an evening, I am just more strict for the rest of the day. We almost always have a proper Sunday dinner at home - and I do eat both stuffing and Yorkshire pudding - but we tend to have a brunch and then dinner, missing lunch entirely, so I feel I have some 'allowance' in the bag. Same on working weekdays, I find it much easier to minimise carbs for breakfast and when I make my own lunch, so I can then enjoy a fairly normal dinner with my husband - we have the same meal usually with slightly different proportions.
     
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  5. Lemonie

    Lemonie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've found that I personally don't substitute across the board but per meal. Chilli I love with a big pile of shredded lettuce and some dairy free sour cream. For a curry I make courgette fritters but add some curry spices to the mix etc. Keep experimenting and checking what works for you.
     
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  6. goose64

    goose64 · Well-Known Member

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    not too keen on courgetti as a pasta replacement as the texture is wrong , but it's good in a stirfry instead of noodles. I eat pasts & rice (45g partions), I find that if I cook them, cool them & then reheat they have aboslutely no effect on my BS, I once had a veg curry with reheated rice & my BS was lower after the meal than before
     
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  7. jal16

    jal16 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Goose, thanks for letting me know about the reheating of it, Ill give it a go. It sounds like you can do that with a number of things and improve them ie potatoes. I quite liked the courgetti in the pesto sauce when I had it, but I am going to try the butternut squash noodles. They're higher carb than courgetti but they sound quite nice anyway, even if I wasnt watching carbs. Its probably a bit more firm consistency than the courgetti. I did buy the cauli cous cous but never fancied it and ended up throwing it away as it went out of date. :arghh:
     
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  8. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I love a cavery and we go quite often I find it the most diabetic friendly eatery really as you choose what you eat I just miss out the roasties or if I can't resist do have one and no Yorkshire pud
     
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  9. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This is really interesting and may be the answer for those who find it very hard to resist the starchy carbs
     
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  10. IvorBarnett

    IvorBarnett · Member

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    I've just read your link and this seems to be groundbreaking stuff. I'm not sure, though, what eating twice heated white rice would be like. The word-stodge- comes to mind!
     
  11. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Reheated rice is fine. It needn't go to mush, although I find microwaving or frying it works best.

    You must, however, make sure you reheat it to piping hot, or some nasty bacteria can survive.
     
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  12. Susiespearish

    Susiespearish Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    We need a few who have stable BG's to trial this ? I can't as I'm using new meds so can't tell if it is meds or resistant starch .It would be the answer for may of us if it works .Stews ...reheated ,so many other choices .
     
  13. letsy

    letsy · Active Member

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    celeriac is great for making chips and mash
    Jerusalem artichokes are a very nice substitute for roast potatoes
     
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  14. Klangley

    Klangley Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I use the slim pasta all the time. You can order it on line from amazon. It needs to be really well rinsed (at least 3 times) under a running tap as it can had a slightly fishy smell out of the packet. The lasagne version is particularly convincing.
     
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  15. jaybay

    jaybay Type 2 · Member

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    Potatoes of any kind seem to take my BG up so I now avoid. What I do use is cauliflower as mash and as topping on 'pie'. It works really well and mashed with a little butter and cream/milk is tasty. A small amount of wholewheat pasta also seems fine but not too much. I would say try stuff and test, that is the only way to see what is OK for you as we all react in different ways.
     
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  16. jal16

    jal16 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Thanks, im going to try the cauli mashed. I have been a bit wary of mashing with butter and cream as have always been following low fats but it looks like people are getting better results using full fat creams etc ;)
     
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  17. jal16

    jal16 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Klangley, I still don't fancy opening the packet :wtf: I may ask my friend to open it and rinse it ha ha, it probably does taste fine in the end and also, its only made out of some kind of flour isnt it :nailbiting: :wideyed:
     
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  18. jal16

    jal16 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Susiepearish, did anyone get back to you about testing this? Im only recently diagnosed and my bG levels are between 12 and 18 so I'm not a great candidate. I just wanted to ask you a quick question, when you cook the veg and let it cool and reheat does it matter if it is left in the water or not? I cooked some baby potatoes the other night in a pan and drained and saved some for another meal but I was just wondering if they should be drained or left in the water for the starch to come out? Also does the same apply to the rice etc. Thanks :)
     
  19. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    As I understand it, it doesn't matter if the articles are drained. It is allegedly to calling and reheating that matters.

    This technique didn't make a single jot of difference to the way my body reacted to pasta etc.

    I can now eat almost anything, although I still choose not to eat certain heavy carb foods, I can eat almost anything because I. Have brought my bloods down, trimmed up and this has eased my insulin resistance.

    My blood scores are in my signature.
     
  20. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Expert

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    I finally got round to opening my pack of Slim Pasta spaghetti yesterday. The smell wasn't as bad as I had been expecting. It smelt a bit like prawns. I rinsed it in running water in a colander which removed any smell, and fried it in a little coconut oil, it doesn't have any taste really, but was ok with some meatballs in chilli sauce.
    It's made from the tuber root of the Konjac plant which grows in SE Asia and eaten a lot in Japan, for its medicinal reputation.
    Konjac corm:
    konjac corm.jpg
     
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