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Phobia of needles

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Jazz97, Apr 16, 2019.

  1. Lowcarb 2

    Lowcarb 2 Type 2 · Active Member

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    To be honest after two years of not feeling in control of my diabetes when they issued me with insulin in December last year the fear and pain were.nothing to the relief of feeling better from taking it
     
  2. Paul520785

    Paul520785 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    T1 for. Just over 61 years. At first I struggled with glass syringes and needles nearly 10 times thicker than used now!
    .
    The trick is finding a site where there is no nerve end.
    If you drag a match stick across your skin - sloped like using a paint brush - you will find places where you cannot feel it.
    .
    Same motion with tip of the needle but should only take 1 to 4 mm. No more.
    .
    2 jabs a day for over 61 years and still surprised that.nothing leaks!
    ..
    Forgive my humour
     
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  3. Erin

    Erin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jazz97, I too just recently started insulin through a pen. Either the dose or the glyclazide stopped working. I suggested gluburide to my dr. as it is more potent and I had to sneak them from years past during the two years of failure in diabetes d'oh!. My dr. preferred insulin, as he was afraid of hypos in glubutride. Ironically it is hypos I am afraid of and not so much the injection of insulin. The injections just confused me at first, and I kept writing steps and guides, and my husband helped me. It is getting better that way after 3 wks. Anyone know if insulin versus glubutride are equivalent in varied dose? I do like insulin btw. So, just keep repeating the steps and use a swab with alcohol on the skin which makes it easier to inject. Cheers, Erin
     
  4. Andy_Totnes_

    Andy_Totnes_ Type 1 · Member

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  5. Andy_Totnes_

    Andy_Totnes_ Type 1 · Member

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    I've got a thing called an Insujet. Bit cumbersome to use but no needles.
    I've been diabetic since 1966, I always say that the first 10 thousand injections are the worst.
    Amazed that I am still here after 53 years, just keep smiling

    Andy in Devon
     
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  6. Alternative Diabetic

    Alternative Diabetic Type 1 · Member

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    It took me 2 weeks , I had to learn to inject an orange in those days (27 yrs ago !!) things may have changed now ... I wrote a blog on my experience www.alternativediabetic.com ... so much has changed now all I can say is the feeling of the pressure on the orange is the same as in our flesh ... go on a reduced carb diet as soon as you can to help with your control it’s changed my life .
     
  7. Jazz97

    Jazz97 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Honestly I live on carbs, so a low carb diet would be way too much of a change for me. I've told myself it's ten seconds of pain to be able to eat what I want.
    To be honest, I dont really understand why so many type 1s want to change their diet so drastically I understand cutting out some carbs, but even then, I'm just eating lower carb versions of things I would usually eat.
    Definitely didn't have to inject an orange! Though I am kinda curious now lol
     
  8. LesH1

    LesH1 Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi, I used to faint at the sight of a needle, and it took me a fortnight, before I eventually thought, I will have to do this myself or I could end up really badly ( even worse dead )!! So I thought I'd rather be alive than dead so Here I am 32 years later injecting myself 4 times daily. Good luck with it.
     
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  9. Jazz97

    Jazz97 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    That's basically the thinking I've got at the moment. I've been known to faint at needles as well. Amazingly got through my hospital stay with only hyperventilating! It could have been a lot worse!
     
  10. Alternative Diabetic

    Alternative Diabetic Type 1 · Member

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    I felt the same I also lived on carbs but that’s what was making my sugars spike!!! Also it depends what carbs ...I had the same attitude but it’s not just the 10 mins of pain it’s the fluctuating sugars that eventually will damage organs in your body ... believe me try and reverse it now before it’s too late give up SUGAR it’s poison .. you can still eat good carbs just take bread with wheat diet drinks sweets /chocolates cows milk try and eat organic and get few natural sugars from fruit change your lifestyle if you want a good healthy life
     
  11. Diane fluteplayer

    Diane fluteplayer Type 1 · Member

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    Hi. Ive been injecting for about 26 years now but had trouble when I started. I was fine for about a week; then I tried my stomach, froze completely and couldn’t do it at all. They sent the district nurse round a few times but timing was understandably hopeless and when she couldn’t get there I ended up in casualty. The nurse on duty took a syringe with a new needle, stuck it in her own arm and said ‘if I can do it, you can’. It worked. It wasn’t easy at first but it got better and I’ve been ok since. I think it may be some kind of instinctive aversion to self-injury and I suspect it’s not uncommon. The other thing that helped a lot was going on an outward bound course organised through the BDA (now diabetes UK). Being with others and seeing a teenager sit on a bunk and say “I hate my injections!” made the whole thing seem normal. If you get the chance to go on a DUK holiday give it a try - it really helps. Hope you get sorted soon. Diane
     
  12. Diane fluteplayer

    Diane fluteplayer Type 1 · Member

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    Re carbs, I do low to medium most of the time and keep sugar low where practical. None in drinks (no fibre or fats to buffer it). I find this works for me without making life to difficult. Go for the easy reductions first.. lots of ideas on this forum. Good luck
     
  13. Jazz97

    Jazz97 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ooh! I'll look into that, thank you!
    I think I'm more scared of going back to hospital than the injections, so that's probably my incentive (that and staying alive obviously!)
    It's definitely good knowing that others have struggled in the past and can inject without any hassle now
     
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