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Prediabetiic Or What?

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by Jack8688, Aug 26, 2018.

  1. Jack8688

    Jack8688 · Member

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    Hello Everyone,

    Although I've lurked here on and off for some time this is my first outing (perhaps I should rephrase this).

    By way of an introduction I have drunk for England for the last 40 of my 70 years, favouring copious wines and liquid bread (aka Beer) as my beverages of choice.

    Around 20 years ago an insurance medical detected sugar in my urine and I was subsequently diagnosed type 2 by my GP.

    Now here's the rub. Over the years my HbA1c has stayed within reasonable limits and every time I am tested the practice nurse exclaims "Well done! You have it really well controlled". As much as I protest that I control nothing other than my drinking arm, the PN will not accept that I might have metabolic syndrome or carbohydrate intolerance and am essentially prediabetic, not diabetic.

    This falls on deaf ears ("Diabetes is not reversible you know") and I am handed a photocopy of that crazy food pyramid that promotes carbs and vilifies fats.

    This year I finally cracked and decided to settle it once and for all by actually doing something constructive to improve my blood results.

    These are my HbA1c results for the last 6 tests with no meds, no special diet and drinking an average of 65 units per week, plus more on special occasions which seem to crop up quite frequently:
    May 2014. 49 mmol/mol
    Jan 2015. 47
    Nov 2015. 45
    Mar 2016. 48
    Mar 2017. 41
    Apr 2018. 45

    So... on 24th April this year I (almost) cut out the booze and started a keto diet. At that point my BMI was 24.9 and my fasting blood glucose was 6.6 mmol/l.

    As of this morning my BMI is 21.9 (9.6 kgs lighter) and my average FBG is 5.2. I am not claiming anything remarkable as this is easily eclipsed by the marvelous results achieved by other members, but I recall my experiences as a patient to make several observations:
    1. The majority of health professionals refuse to accept that type 2 can be reversed.
    2. They offer no constructive help other than flaunt the disasterous food pyramid which has probably contributed to the avoidable demise of many.
    3. Metformin and statins are pushed at every opportunity with no consideration given to more natural approaches such as LCHF.
    4. It would appear that once you hit the magic 48 mmol/mol you are a diabetic and ever more shall be so. Once they have you they don't want to let you go.

    I apologise if this reflects a somewhat jaundiced view, but if someone had told me 20 years ago that a few months effort could potentially cure me I would not now be penning this diatribe to you fine folk.

    As to my next move, I will continue the keto diet and in February 2019 hopefully have the pleasure of offering a metaphoric two finger salute to those who have disregarded my objections over the years.

    Watch this space but don't hold your breath... at least not yet!
     
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  2. Moggely

    Moggely · Guest

    Hi @Jack8688 .I will be watching that space and find it rather fascinating. Then again i'm willing to listen to anyone's story. Statins and Metforim are always pushed, it's big industry..."my opinion only you understand" They don't offer enough help.."most peoples opinion i think" Don't apologize as you have no need to but your in this forum for a reason. I don't know if type2 can be reversed, i do believe it can be controlled though. Some in here call it reversed and maybe they are right but to me T2 can be controlled. Keto i agree with as many in here are doing that including myself. Your levels seem to be good but I'm not a doctor and others more experienced in that may help. As for booze....WELL.. In moderation maybe. I and my husband were really social people and went out a lot with friends and so on. since then though i have cut the alcohol for the most part.Hope you stick around.
     
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  3. Atlantico

    Atlantico Reactive hypoglycemia · Active Member

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    Very interesting Jack. What has happened to your HbA1c levels since starting your keto diet in April this year? Look forward to heaeing. Sedbet.
     
  4. Jack8688

    Jack8688 · Member

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    Thank you Moggely for your very kind reply and welcome.
    Until I started my keto diet I never considered drinking in moderation... I couldn't spell it so I didn't do it.

    I actually rarely drank before the age of 30 when I joined a company with a strong drinking culture. All executive offices had replenished cocktail cabinets and the MD was fond of saying "Never trust a man who doesn't drink". Getting clients ****** was an integral part of the job role and it's been downhill ever since.

    Anyhow, for the last 4 months I have been drinking well below NHS recommended limits, but only because I can't spare the carbs or calories.

    Regarding the reversibility of Type 2, the point I was clumsily making was that at 47 mmol/mol one is prediabetic and at 48 mmol/mol one has truly arrived.

    As I have bounced from 49 into high normal territory over the years I have refused to give up gracefully, culminating in my present attempt at proving 'em wrong.

    Fingers crossed!
     
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  5. Moggely

    Moggely · Guest

    Oh I see @Jack8688 .Well your welcome i don't know about kind lol. But i really hope you can prove them wrong. In my opinion, and like you i was in denial about diabetes as it's only been 6 months. I don't really understand the UK guide lines to diabetes but in Australia it's 4 to 5.5 which is normal and over 6 and 6.5 diabetes ,i think in the Uk it is different i don't really know. May i ask a question though.....Do you think you may be in denial, because i was for about a month. I understand about the situation with your job though and a strong drinking culture and so on. I don't think you were clumsily making your point either. Apart from that maybe a change of GP's do you think?.
     
  6. Jack8688

    Jack8688 · Member

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    Hi Sedbet,

    Since hitting 41 mmol/mol in 2017 my GP has reduced HbA1c testing to once per year so I regretfully have only the April 2018 reading.

    I could go for a private testing but then again I will be interested in the result after a full year of keto.

    BTW I find the whole LCHF experience very easy and sustainable as opposed to calorie restricting diets which focus on low fat.
     
  7. Jack8688

    Jack8688 · Member

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    Yes, of course I might be in denial but I'm trying to rationalise my relatively steady numbers over the past 20 years, despite being an ardent boozer.

    Now, if my numbers were always above 48 (6.5%) I would accept the diagnosis, but I have stayed in the high normal/prediabetic range most of the time without any dietary controls.

    This time I'm really trying because I guess I want to prove something to both the GP and myself one way or another.
     
  8. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Expert

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    Often the lines between high normal and Pre Diabetic are blurred and the same goes for the lines between Pre Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. The medics have to draw a diagnostic line and so we see these numbers quoted as such. In my opinion, the number 48 means little as those with Pre D and T2 are definitely insulin resistant to some extent.

    As to reversal/remission, this must be predicated on one's own individual circumstances but to say that it is impossible or unlikely for all of us with metabolic Diabetes is wrong, people have turned things around with changes to diet and medications, even insulin, and attain and maintain non D numbers. Hope is a powerful driver and no one should ever deny us the keys to the car.
     
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  9. Jack8688

    Jack8688 · Member

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    Thank you Guzzler.

    I totally agree with you about the need to set some sort of demarcation limits but regretfully GPs and PNs do not appear to use any discretion when reviewing the numbers.

    The right advice and encouragement would have had me addressing this particular issue years ago. However there appears a general lack of interest beyond pushing pills and little evidence that they know any more than I do... and perhaps even less as I am at least familiar with the benefits of a ketogenic diet.

    It seems to me that support from people such as yourself is far more effective than the photocopied information typically presented at review time.
     
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