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Pump On Holiday

Discussion in 'Insulin Pump Forum' started by Toriroge, Sep 9, 2018.

  1. Toriroge

    Toriroge Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi guys , I'm off on honeymoon next Sunday and just wanted some pump users advice

    This will be my first holiday with a pump on and I like to spend the day in the pool I know the pump sets don't stay on for long in the water any advice to keep it on for longer?
    Or do people go back to injecting in the day so can be swimming as much as they want to ?

    And advice would be great thank you x
     
  2. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    What type of pump do you use?
    I have a tubey pump which I disconnect when in the pool and just reconnect for a top up basal (plus bolus when eating) every 30 or 60 minutes.
    I have not experienced any problems with the set coming away in the water but I don’t spend long enough in the pool to go (even more) wrinkly.
    I guess you could fasten down your set with tape if you are concerned.

    I have no experience of a tubeless pump such as a Omnipod. Hopefully someone with such experience will join in the conversation.

    I know some people take pump holidays when they are away.
    I have never done this on a trip but had an enforced pump break when my pump broke recently. I did not enjoy those days without an ability to adjust my basal throughout the day or give myself corrections less than one unit whilst doing additional calculations working out my insulin on board, different insulin sensitivities and insulin to carb ratios at different times of the day (I know some meters can do this) and questioning whether the dose I remembered was correct.
    This was followed by a couple of hypoey days when I returned to the pump.
    It may be less stressful for you.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  3. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Not a pumper myself, @Toriroge , but something which gets mentioned from time to time is the "untethered regime" so might be worth doing a search in the forum for that.

    It seems to be a mix and match of some lantus/basal and pump.

    Looks like the guy who came up with the idea did so because of his interest in watersports.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Untethered_regimen

    And congrats on the honeymoon!
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  4. Toriroge

    Toriroge Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hi thanks for the reply guys.

    I also have a tube pump I'm on the Medtronic, I think I will probablyjust connect and 're connect throughout the day I just love spending the day in the pool ! And with a 14 month old who loves water I'm sure she will want to be in the pool alot too.

    Thanks Scott I will look In to that xx
     
  5. kitedoc

    kitedoc Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I think Medtronics emphasise that their pumps are not waterproof or water tight. Keeping the untethered pump out of the sun and insulin not exposed to >30 degrees C is also worth thinking about. I agree with the way @helensaramay manages it with insulin top-ups. Maybe a waterproof watch with an alarm might help as a reminder.
    Having a way of monitoring ketones as well as BSLs is worth thinking about as we pumpers tend to develop high BSLs and ketones much quicker than those of long-acting insulins, when the pumps fails, or tops-ups are forgotten or the needle insert is bent under the skin and restricts insulin input without necessarily setting off the obstruction alarm.
    Also, the last thing you need is for your pump to be stolen or locked up in a locker with the key lost, so you will need to have a 'lost pump' and 'pump failure' prevention and action plans sorted well before you depart.
    There is a thread called "Preparing for Failure" in the Pump Forum which will help in this regard.
    Most importantly enjoy your honeymoon.!:););)
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
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