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Pumps - questions

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by CrankyKat, Apr 17, 2018.

  1. CrankyKat

    CrankyKat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi everyone, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes early this year and for a while now I have been thinking about going on to the insulin pump. This is for a few reasons but 1 having the convenience of not having to carry round a needle and getting it out to inject 3 times a day.

    I would like to make my life a bit easier and was wondering if this is something that could be a help for me?

    I have been doing my research and found that a majority of the pumps are waterproof - up to a certain point of course! My boyfriend has some reserves though. One question he has asked is can they be accidentally ripped out of the infusion site?

    Do you keep an emergency pen with you in case of errors on the pump?

    Would you still have the need for long lasting insulin and if yes is the answer do they do pumps that carry both insulin types?

    I have got a diabetic nurse appointment booked for August but I would like to gather information before.

    Thanks guys xx
     
  2. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Your profile says you have type 2 diabetes. If that's not correct you might want to update your profile with the correct information.

    Having a pump doesn't mean you don't need to carry round a needle, you need the back up of a spare cannula or a pen set in case the pump fails.

    Pumps can accidentally be ripped out of the infusion site. I managed to do this in the night in November 2016 and by the time I woke up in the morning was too confused by hyperglycaeimia to do anything about it and went into DKA.

    If you are considering getting a pump, you really need to do a bit more investigation on how they work. Pumps only deliver bolus insulin. This is delivered continuously through the day as your basal insulin. So no, there is no need for long acting insulin when using a pump and there are no pumps that deliver both insulins, because that's not how they work. You will still need a back up basal pen for pump failures.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    The biggest benefit of a pump is not cutting back the amount of diabetes paraphernalia you have to carry around with you. It is the huge benefit of being able to adjust your basal dose very easily for different times of the day and different activities. This is achieved by delivering fast acting insulin throughout the day as your basal insulin.

    Whilst pumps are waterproof, I usually remove mine when showering/bathing/swimming. They can be removed for 30 minutes to an hour without much problem.

    Regarding ripping out the cannula: it can happen but it is rare especially if you keep the tube tucked in.

    I have spare insulin pens in case of pump failure but, generally, do not carry them around with me during the day. I know some pumpers do but I find a syringe gives me peace of mind in case of failure.
    When I go away, I take a larger bag of bits than when on the pen: in addition to spare pens, I also carry all the stuff necessary to change the cannula and cartridge on my pump (which needs to be done every 2 to 3 days).

    For me, the pump has been great but it is not a silver bullet, it is not more convenient and requires at least as much effort as pens.

    If you are thinking of going for a pump, I would seriously consider why you want it and why the NHS should invest the extra for you to have it. This last bit may sound harsh but a pump is not available to everyone because it is much more expensive than injecting. So there needs to be some justification. The extent of this justification varies per area: for me, my diabetes nurse supported me to reduce hypos and continue exercising; in other areas, the person with diabetes has to push very hard and provide evidence to support their need.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    #3 Deleted Account, Apr 17, 2018 at 10:09 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 17, 2018
  4. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

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    I agree that it's rare to pull out a cannula - as it's anchored to the skin.

    Yes you will need to keep a quick acting pen too as unexplained highs require a bolus shot to bring levels down, I keep pens in the fridge for the rare event of going high as it's easier than bolusing corrections on the pump when it might be a blocked cannula or bad insulin.

    Your trust will of expected you to of completed DAFNE first so you have a full understanding of all issues relating to insulin management first.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. CrankyKat

    CrankyKat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all your support so far :) I do really appreciate all the help and hope that when I see the nurses in August I can plead my case of why I would like one. Xx
     
  6. CrankyKat

    CrankyKat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Also how do I change my profile info!
     
  7. Books1

    Books1 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Click on your own picture, click on profile page, then click on information to update your info

    Frances
     
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  8. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    I would focus on why you NEED a pump not why you would like one.
     
  9. CrankyKat

    CrankyKat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That is what I mean... !
     
    • Like Like x 1
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