1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Risks of depression

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Mark-optimistic, Sep 28, 2016.

  1. Mark-optimistic

    Mark-optimistic Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    62
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Hey guys and gals,

    So I heard that people with diabetes have a higher chance of suffering with depression.

    I recently was diagnosed by my doctor and I was interested to know whether it was due to the stress of diabetes or just a risk factor that is created with having diabetes.

    It kind of came out of nowhere and there is no logical explanation. I'm not a stressful person so it's a mystery to me.


    Keep smiling
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  2. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    23,618
    Likes Received:
    19,618
    Trophy Points:
    278
    As someone newly diagnosed I would say it's due to the shock of being diagnosed with diabetes and having to come to term with dealing with it and managing the condition, but people with diabetes are more prone to depression than people who don't have the condition as the following article explains:

    According to NICE, people who are diagnosed with a chronic physical health problem such as diabetes are 3 times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than people without it.

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes-and-depression.html

    Hopefully in the next few weeks/months you should start to feel better in yourself Mark, if you don't then I'd certainly mention the depression to your Dr or diabetes care team. Best wishes.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. ally1

    ally1 Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,376
    Likes Received:
    21,762
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I am interested in what members replies will be. I am type 2 and have bipolar. I have read and been told by my pysch that having bipolar, its very common to get type2. Also one of the pysch meds i am on, is well known to cause type 2 but i can't see the connection. Pysch wants to keep me on that med at a low dise, because my diabetes is more controlled and the med is really helping me
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    7,238
    Likes Received:
    17,069
    Trophy Points:
    178
    a lot of people gets diabetes from anti-depressive meds and from anti-pshychotic meds too, these meds do raise the risk of getting diabetes rather much ...
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. fletchweb

    fletchweb Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    408
    Likes Received:
    451
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I had an encounter with depression a few years back (I mean serious depression) As it turned out the medical staff I had at the time were quite methodical. It was believed that the cause was artificial sweeteners - something that both type 1 and 2s often consume. I was also drinking a lot of pop with artificial sweetener - 1 liter/day. The medical staff told me to stop drinking that and replace it with ordinary water - after about 2 weeks my depression went away and has never come back. Perhaps it was coincidence but personally I would suggest to anyone who has diabetes and suffering from depression to try and measure the amount of artificial sweetener you consume and if at possible try to cut down on it or perhaps stop it all together to see if that is the cause.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. robertconroy

    robertconroy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    108
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Yes diabetes causes depression, especially women on insulin. I'm a retired certified nutritionist consultant in the U.S. I mostly treated obesity and type 2 diabetes. Nutrition plays a huge role in depression and treating depression. Latest studies prove depression can be an allergic reaction to inflammation of the brain, sucessfully treated by EPA/DHA omega-3. An excellent book to read by the #1 functional medicine doctor in the U.S. is The Ultra Mind Solution by Dr Mark Hyman. Also has a book called The Blood Sugar Solution and a new one called Eat Fat Get Thin. I've red and use, all his books. Amazon.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,237
    Likes Received:
    1,183
    Trophy Points:
    198
    For me, it was the initial diagnosis, plus the realisation that the dietary advice was obvious nonsense, and the treatment was going to be inadequate; based, as it is, on waiting for the patient to deteriorate before the NHS does anything about it. I needed counselling as a result of this, and am still taking antidepressants - mainly because I still gave very little confidence that the NHS will look after me.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook