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Running before or after meal?

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by Skinny43, Nov 4, 2019.

  1. Skinny43

    Skinny43 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi I’m new to prediabetes and want to do my best to prevent developing to type 2. I’m doing LCHF diet.
    I’m generally fairly active. Running 2-3 times a week with each run anywhere between 3 and 8 miles. I have also run a couple of half marathons.

    Prior to the prediabetes diagnosis, I have normally run before meal - 8 miles first thing in the morning or 3-5 miles before lunch. However after reading some reports running can increase your BG, I’m now hesitant as to when is the best time to run. Am I making my BG higher by running? Should I run after a meal? Wouldn’t that be uncomfortable with a full stomach?

    I thought about measuring BG before and after my run to learn how my body reacts. However if I run for 1 hour between 1 and 2 hours after meal, doesn’t the BG vary within my 1 hour running time anyway? How do I know whether the increase ( if it increases) is due to the running or the natural spike curve after meal?

    I guess I’m a bit confused and sometimes end up with not running at all because I don’t know when to do it. I’m looking advice from you more experienced people.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. sno0opy

    sno0opy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Note my experience is only from three months, but i have tested allot and do allot of exercise so have plenty of data points if not plenty of years at them!

    The spike after strenuous exercise is not that high and usually comes down quickly. If I do a set at the gym or a run which does not tax me (I’ve I’m not really pushing) I don’t notice a rise.


    If I do a very hard exercise session where I’m really sweaty and out of breath I see a rise, but still not very high (maybe from resting 5 to post exercise 6 or 7). Within 30 mins its down again to normal


    As a bonus, when you exercise you stimulate your muscles which helps reduce insulin resistance so when you eat your meal your levels don’t go up as high.


    Honest I don’t think you should over think it, exercise is good for you and don’t let this diagnosis change it for you. If your in the pre diabetic range, a to your diet and continue with exercise is likely to bring your results down nicely any way.

    I was well in the diabetic range at 87 and i'm tacking it with diet and exercise - the benefit you get far exceeds the short spikes in my view.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. Skinny43

    Skinny43 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Snoopy! That’s comforting to know it doesn’t matter that much. I can still do my normal routine that’s good news.
     
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