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Running In The Heat Tips

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by Wurst, Sep 1, 2016.

  1. Wurst

    Wurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've got my first running race (this century) lined up in ~ 9 days , its only 6.5 km but it's going to be a fast pace and it's currently forecast to be 31 degrees C on the day.
    Before the heatwave here I was running a pre breakfast pace of ~ 4:50 mins per km comfortably (which is good for me) in cool conditions , during the ongoing heatwave my pace has slipped dramatically to ~ 5:15 mins per km and on some days I haven't been able to complete the training runs at all. I can run the 1st 3 km at 4:30 pace but then I seriously wilt in the heat.
    I've run in 25 degC and 87 % humidity which was a nightmare, the sweat was unbelievable!

    So any tips on how to overcome this , is the only way to slow down and lower expectations? The route has absolutely no shade, so running in the shade is not an option :)
     
  2. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The only advice I can offer is to keep hydrated on the day, wear as little as possible, and not cotton
    I regularly do parkruns, they are not a race (only against yourself) and find that weather has a big impact on my times when I push hard
     
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  3. Wurst

    Wurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks @walnut_face , do you find a light/ mesh cap helps or does this cause further heat build up? I'm pondering whether to buy one.
     
  4. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    For me the only advantage of being bald is that the heat escapes, and keeps me cooler. For your eyes just a peak might help
     
  5. Karenchq

    Karenchq Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I am also a "heat wilter" and go low exercising in the heat. As others have said, hydrate and hydrate along the way even if you do not feel thirsty. I read an article that said coconut water (not milk) is nature's optimal sports drink, so I gave it a try. I mixed half and half with water and took a drink every 10-15 minutes. I think that helped me quite a bit to replace electrolytes lost by sweating. Also, I go a bit high (10-10.5 mmol) before starting and eat a packet if Shot Blocks (sports chews) spaced out about the same as the water. Since I am often hypo unaware, I share with those around me and ask them to keep an eye on me for any signs of hypo. A few times, partners have seen signs before I knew that I was going low. Of course, everyone is different and this doesn't always work perfectly for me, but it certainly helps. I wish you all the best on your run. Don't forget to give a post run update.
     
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  6. Wurst

    Wurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tips @Karenchq, I'll give coconut water a go on tomorrow's training session. 99 % of all my running is done in the morning so I've never experienced a low when running, in fact I have to inject a few units of bolus before a session. Best watch out for this on race day, more afternoon training sessions are needed:-0
     
  7. Bebo321

    Bebo321 Family member · Well-Known Member

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    Good luck for your run!
    Your idea of a hat isn't a bad one. A tip for keeping cool when cycling is to wear a cap underneath your helmet that has been soaked in water. Likewise consider dousing you hair/hat in water before you begin and it should help keep you cool.
     
  8. MangosteenElbow

    MangosteenElbow Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hydration and thermoregulation are distinct yet related issues.
    There's a reasonable amount of research on impaired thermoregulation by exercising diabetics. Apart from excellent suggestions above, consider trying: neckerchief soaked in water; chilling head before the race (ice pack on sconce!); anything to cool down quickly the core after the race (ice slurry can work for some); training with "ice vest" (either a freezer chilled vest or an evaporative water soaked vest - both add significant weight so are not race day solutions but add a training effect). If there is ever an opportunity during training or even a race (e.g. indentured family supporter) trial ice slurries.
    My thermoregulation impairment significantly reduced after becoming keto adapted (a phenomenon really explored by researchers) and if course the hypos and extreme variations in BGLs went away. Topic for anorher thread!
    If you are still carb dependents the adding carbs in some form effective for you to ice slurries serves hydration, cooling and carb management. Next best during distance race might be carbs in a mouth wash (aim is to rinse mouth with carbs in water but not ingest thru stomach).
     
  9. Wurst

    Wurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks again for all the tips. I took some iced water with me and poured it over my cap before start. Started to wilt at the 4 km point and had to slow down.
    Despite that the race went ok, it was > 30 degrees C on the day , I came 98th out of ~ 400 with an average pace of 4.57 mins per KM.
    Very enjoyable and I'll be doing more in the future.
     
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  10. MangosteenElbow

    MangosteenElbow Type 1 · Active Member

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    Well done. Keep at it.
    Did you cool the body down afterwards as well? It's a good part of your recovery strategy.
     
  11. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  12. Wurst

    Wurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    A cold shower when I got home :) Found out later I was eighth in the over 40 category, sounds better than 98th :)
     
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  13. copepod

    copepod Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I prefer cool to hot weather. When I have to run in heat, I often pour some cold water over my hair, face and neck, so that it evapourates and cools when I move. As parkrun has been mentioned, these have the advantage of being earlyish - always Saturdays, 9am in England & Wales, 9.30am in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Much earlier in Australia, South Africa etc.
     
  14. ElyDave

    ElyDave Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    4 miles?

    JFID

    Go out hard, up the pace, suffer.

    The harder you run the quicker it ends. It's a race after all.
     
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