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School and diabetes

Discussion in 'Parents' started by Rowlandadams, Mar 7, 2018.

  1. Rowlandadams

    Rowlandadams · Newbie

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    My 11 year old son was diagnosed with type 1 just over a year ago , and I keep getting called in about his behaviour I've tried telling them it could be his bloods as they are running slightly high but they keep banging on to me about adhd I'm only just got used to type 1 training for him, this added strain is not wanted.
     
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  2. Heyrehair

    Heyrehair Parent · Member

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    Sounds very frustrating. T1 can be hard to deal with on it's own without other factors to consider.

    Without giving away any personal info about your son on here, did the school give any indication as to why they think it is ADHD? Or has there been any formal diagnosis by a qualified Clinical Psychologist?

    If it is indeed ADHD there are options to help manage it via the NHS, but the school need to be considerate in how they communicate with you and help work with you and your son.
     
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  3. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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  4. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    What does he have for breakfast?
     
  5. Celsus

    Celsus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    ADHD symptoms are only really similar to the 'Diabetes side-effects' happening when you are going too low.
    So if said boy is going low in blood sugar, not when going high. All of course except if its all about becoming completely non-responsive etc which of course can happen when going high. But not just slightly high, it takes its really very very high, at the level where nausea, vomiting etc as present. And why all this focus on the diabetes anyway? Its is rarely if ever the cause for a IDDM child not to do well in school.

    Of the top-10 typical signs of ADHD only 1-2 of them can be borderline considred similar to anything Diabetes related.
    And why not accept the response from the school staff and take it head on? Be serious and find out if it is anything related to ADHD or not. I would think it would be common knowledge by now, but maybe not. All children are going to exhibit some of these ADHD behaviors at some point, during their growing up! That is normal!
    However, you should start thinking about the next steps if:
    • Your child regularly displays signs of ADHD
    • This behavior is affecting their success in school and leading to negative interactions with their peers.
    So seek help with a professional to get it investigated properly. And if diagnosed, ADHD is treatable. Review all of the treatment options. Then, set up a time to meet with a doctor or psychologist to determine the best course of action. Don't just blame it on Diabetes and let it keep lingering like this. Not good for the child and not good for the relationship with the school.
     
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  6. Rowlandadams

    Rowlandadams · Newbie

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    Thank you all for the advice and comments I will take this on board when I have my next appointment with my boy's doctor which is on the 13th I'd this month , it's nice to know I can seek friendly advice and understanding off those that are not ignorant to this disease
     
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  7. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It may be worth getting a CGM and using it for at least two weeks while he is at school, asking the school to also record the times of any issues.
     
  8. bobcurly

    bobcurly Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My 11 year daughter is vile when she is high..grumpy, shouts, storms off, slams doors, cant be reasoned with, cant concentrate....i can see that itmay affect him in school if it goes on. Thankfully half hr after a correction it settles so doesnt affect her at school too much
     
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  9. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I admit i used to be like that back at school, Occasionally happens still college whenever my bloods high. Back at school the main problem was not may teachers knew i was T1D. So they thought i was misbehaving.
     
  10. Celsus

    Celsus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds exactly like my own 12 year old boy!

    And he is not diabetic. :)

    But just like any other teenager trying to come to terms with life reality while the hormones flushes up in the system.
     
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