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Sharps Box Disposal Nightmares!

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by wondermouse, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. china

    china · Member

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    Hi kmckinty

    Re your travel query: I travel long-haul frequently and only take hand luggage. I got a note from my doctor explaining why I carry sharps, and so far have not had a single query from airline staff. So no, you don't have to pay a fortune for anything. Happy travelling!
     
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  2. christineb

    christineb · Newbie

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    I am having problems getting somebody to take my sharps bin. Pharmacy wouldn't take it, GP surgery wouldn't take it and Diabetic Clinic wouldn't take it. I was told by one place to wrap it up in bubble wrap and put it in the Bin!!!!!!!I have had type 1 diabetes for 40yrs and am also a qualified nurse and know the importace of disposal of sharps. Have we gone backwards then in our diabetic care. Hope we don't go back to boiling glass syringes. Even then where would I put my sharps?
     
  3. IrishJoe

    IrishJoe Type 1 · Active Member

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    I'm in a similar predicament. . . the coucil doesn't collect them, nor does the GPs and I'm not home til 6:30 so any clinics or what not (not that I'm sure they exist..) would be closed. Its a bit vexing although when I move it shall be easier I hope
     
  4. Synonym

    Synonym · Well-Known Member

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    I think that this is yet another issue which has arisen due to funding and no-one wants to be landed with the costs involved in responsible disposal of sharps. :shock:

    I rather think that surreptitious disposal of said sharps into GP’s or hospital’s sharps bins looks as if it will become the order of the day! :roll:

    I can just see future headlines shouting about irresponsible diabetics carelessly throwing sharps in general waste to the danger and injury of the workers :!:
     
  5. pang3e

    pang3e · Member

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    Hi

    I've not had anything on prescription for type 2, been told I don't need to test but since being on this site, I got myself kitted out and I actually get my sharps bin from the local needle exchange and have been told I can return it when its full and get a new one at any point and its free.

    So if you can find a needle exchange in your area, then maybe they will offer the same - it might have a big sticker on the side saying how important it is not to share needles :oops: :roll: but it's worth it if it keeps your needles out of the general waste. It's not fun getting a sharps injury.

    Ang
     
  6. TheScribbler

    TheScribbler Type 1 · Member

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    I get my sharps bins on prescription. The pharmacy says that it won't dispose of the full bins. I think the surgery doesn't really want them either, but as I pass the door on the way to work it's pretty handy for me, so I leave them with the receptionist, smile sweetly, and run for it! :D
     
  7. NEWRADKID

    NEWRADKID · Member

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    I get my sharpes box via my Doctor on prescription from the chemist,but ,oddly,have to return it when full to my Doctors surgery in Blackburn Lancashire
     
  8. roo.be

    roo.be Type 1 · Active Member

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    If you contact the Environmental Health department of your Local Authority they often have a supply and disposal service. You ring and they deliver a bucket sized container which when you've filled it you ring again and organise collection of it at which point they also then give you another bucket.

    I would advise against putting any medical surplus in the household waste as the bin men can refuse to empty your rubbish if they any suspicion of dangerous items being put in them, especially sharps.

    Where we live if you so much as mix the plastic with the glass in the recycling the bin men get over excited and don't take the rubbish!!
     
  9. laurals11

    laurals11 Type 1 · Member

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    I use a BD Safe Clip (PIP Code: 002-9116)which you can get on prescription
    http://www.bd.com/uk/diabetes/page.aspx?cat=14153&id=31358 to clip the used needle. Rest of needle into can/bottle and seal top with tape,dispose of in ordinary bin.Have used clippers since I was diagnosed 23 years ago.

    Used to to dispose of lancets in same bottle/can but whilst doing DAFNE course last year I was given Accuchek Multiclix http://www.accu-chek.co.uk/gb/products/fingerprickers/multiclix.html
    It's brilliant 6 lancets in drum so you never handle sharp and they can be disposed of in household bin.
     
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  10. caspararemi

    caspararemi · Member

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    Just so you know, lancets are clinical waste, even if snipped, so the needle clip device needs to be disposed of in the same way as needles themselves, via a sharps bin. A needle clip device can be useful for transporting the needles themselves but that's all. It's illegal to throw these in the bin with household waste :(
     
  11. caspararemi

    caspararemi · Member

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    If anyone is having problems disposing of their sharps bins, contact the PALS department of your PCT. They're the Patient Advice and Liaison Service. It's their job to make you a happy customer, and in my experience they're pretty good at getting things done for you! Just explain to them your problem and they'll get an answer for you, either ensuring your GP practice is up to date with current procedures or pointing you at the Local Authority (and ensuring they know its their responsibility).

    You can find your PCT's PALS details by searching on the NHS website at http://www.nhs.uk
     
  12. jollyrambler

    jollyrambler · Member

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    Hi i got my sharps bin from my local council,i would ring them & see if you can get one,i just ring them back when it is full & the come & collect it.Best of luck John :D
     
  13. laurals11

    laurals11 Type 1 · Member

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    Hmm..I was told to tape needle clip and dispose of in ordinary bin.I'm in Scotland ..still searching for info online. Grateful if anyone can point me at relevant site/pages
     
  14. dmilnes

    dmilnes Type 2 · Newbie

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    My sharps used to be disposed of by my local surgery, but this changed some months ago.
    Now this is done by my local district council, who will collect a finished bin from the doorstep on demand, and leave a new bin to use thereafter. This works well.
    If you need this service, I suggest you have a look at your local council authority's website - there should be something there about it.
     
  15. crystalyips

    crystalyips · Member

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    L just take my full sharps bin to my surgery where it is instantly exchanged for a new one.
    I must have a good pct because I can also have as many test strips as I want.
     
  16. hanadr

    hanadr · Expert

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    WHL
    do you put the "caps" back on to the lancets?
    I only change mine once in a blue moon and then I put the cap from the new one on to the old one. I used to just drop them into an empty catfood can. Now we have a sharps bin. Husband is a T1. I drop them in there. I also drop in the used test strips. They are not sharp, but are clinical.
    Hana
     
  17. stuart bilbey

    stuart bilbey · Member

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    hi i have yust take sharp bin to surgary no problem but the person who puts them in a cearel pack
    and put them in to normal bin this could cause serious problems. my advice is get a percription for a
    sharp bin and do the job properly and dont put other people in danger
     
  18. Fletchr

    Fletchr · Member

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    Get this from the Higland council???

    “Would the Convener agree that all persons being issued with hypodermic needles by the Medical Services for the purposes of at home self injection also be issued with “sharps box” to allow the safe disposal of the used needles?”

    The written answer had been circulated and confirmed that the Scottish Executive Health Department were responsible for determining policy in relation to the issue of sharps boxes and current advice given to persons issued with hypodermic needles for the purpose of self injection at home was to place used needles in a drinks can with a lid and dispose of it in the normal domestic waste stream. Responsibility for the issue, collection and disposal of sharps boxes lay with the local Health Board. However, there did appear to be an anomalous situation in that used needles disposed of in a drinks can were classed as domestic waste while used needles disposed of in a sharps box were classed as clinical waste and Officials had therefore written to the Scottish Executive Health Department to ask that they review their advice in relation to the disposal of hypodermic needles issued for the purpose of self injection at home. A reply had been received which had confirmed that the policy was under review and consultation was to be undertaken with other organisations.



    The Council NOTED the position.
     
  19. copepod

    copepod Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed

    I can't see any reason to put used blood glucose testing strips into sharps bins - they're bulky and many people have enough problems getting rid of full sharps boxes without filling them faster. Strips have a tiny amount of blood, compared to sanitary items (tampons or pads), which should be placed in domestic waste, not down the toilet.
     
  20. cugila

    cugila · Master

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    Re: Sharps Disposal - Help Needed


    Whether you see any reason or not, they are classed as 'Clinical Waste' therefore they are supposed to be disposed of properly. I do see your point though, strange. I know the rules sometimes seem mad.....however that's what they are.
    Our's to reason why etc.......... :?

    Clinical waste is often generated in the community. Household clinical waste may include sanitary towels, tampons, condoms and nappies. These may be disposed of together with other household wastes, in a black bag in the dustbin.

    Disposable nappies from hospitals, nurseries, play groups etc, are classed as clinical waste and incinerated.

    This is not the case for other types of clinical waste such as needles used by diabetics, blood testing strips, kidney dialysis bags, unused or out of date prescription medicines, incontinence pads or other such waste produced by patients receiving medical care in the home. These wastes should not under any circumstances be put in the dustbin.

    Ken
     
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