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Shift Working , any advice?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Colin Crowhurst, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. Colin Crowhurst

    Colin Crowhurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Currently contemplating a career change, when chatting at the recruitment event I was asked how I would handle the changing shifts, obviously couldn't really be sure so thought I'd ask on here.

    12 hour shifts ; 2-4 days and 2-4 nights with gaps between.........
     
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  2. Listlad

    Listlad Prediabetes · BANNED

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    Quite an interesting topic. I worked an alternating 12 hour shift pattern for decades. My wife currently works nights only.

    Mostly the consensus seems to be that night shift work isn’t great for health in general, so for me it would come as no surprise if there was a link to or impact on diabetes.
     
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    #2 Listlad, Feb 10, 2019 at 7:24 PM
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  3. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Agree with @Listlad that shift working doesn't seem to be particularly healthy, but that goes for non-D's as well. And some work simply has to be done at stupid o'clock. From a managing T1 point of view I'd say just do as when not shift working: Take your basal at regular time, bolus when eating and correct when necessary.
     
  4. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Shift work, especially split shifts, play havoc with the circadian rhythm which is known to affect the metabolism to some degree.
     
  5. Colin Crowhurst

    Colin Crowhurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm, no split shifts, and only need 12u Insulin breakfast & dinner time..... think I can handle it, also only driving a desk although fairly high stress levels involved, more thoughts?
     
  6. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    What insulin regime are you on? Is this a mixed insulin?

    edit: I see you're on mixed insulin. That could prove to be tricky with shift work. Most T1's are on a basal/bolus regime, taking long acting insulin once or twice a day (depending on insulin brand) and short acting before meals. The dose of short acting depends on the amount of carbs we eat, blood sugar level before eating and insulin sensitivity at that time of day.
    Mixed insulin is not very flexible, and seen as old fashioned by many people.
     
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    #6 Antje77, Feb 10, 2019 at 8:22 PM
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  7. Colin Crowhurst

    Colin Crowhurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  8. evilclive

    evilclive Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Might be worth talking to your DSN about moving to basal/bolus - a regime you can tweak to cope with the changes shift working brings.

    (ie what Antje said)
     
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    #8 evilclive, Feb 10, 2019 at 10:13 PM
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  9. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @Colin Crowhurst ,

    A change of job with rotating shift patterns is not out of the question.. "Needs must..." & all that.

    However, the insulin regime maybe a little too rigid to accommodate the shift patterns you've mentioned with the new career..
    It may suit you using an MDI regime. (Basal/bolus.) if you're planning this sort of working hour pattern?

    I worked with a guy half my age a while back on a Novomix & he struggled to keep up with what was a pretty "ad hock" work profile throwing his BG about.. I'm 50 year old bloke. I spent my youth on 2 jabs & regular feeding times.
    I'm pretty certain I couldn't keep "rock & roll" working hours on the regime.

    Hope this helps. & good luck with the career move.
     
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  10. Colin Crowhurst

    Colin Crowhurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Cheers all, looks like my DSN is in for a few extra questions at my regular appointment this week then!
     
  11. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    All I know is. I can start some jobs at "stupid o'clock" & other times a more functional 9 to 5er..
    I was put on MDI by my GP back in the late 1980s due to my erratic lifestyle starting a college.
    As well as the "day job" these days I also play in two bands..
    It took me a while to get my head round the MDI regime at the time, but I felt more ready for anything rather than dictated by a "regimented" day?

    Hopefully it may give you some flexibility with your own career & life choices?

    Good luck, & let us know how you get on...
     
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  12. Copernicus

    Copernicus Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    For what its worth. I worked shifts in the Police for over 20 years as a type 1 diabetic. i retired and now work part time, also working shifts, although not as extreme as the Police pattern. Just got to be careful, keep testing on a regular basis, much easier now with Libre, and accept the fact that shift work for anyone, is not good for your health.
     
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  13. Colin Crowhurst

    Colin Crowhurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Cheers for all the advice, spoken to the DSN today, and if I do change they can put me on a "more flexible routine" so things are looking good!
     
  14. Ralphietype1

    Ralphietype1 Type 1 · Newbie

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    How was it in the police? Did you feel that you were given time to eat and test bloods?
     
  15. Deleted Account

    Deleted Account · Guest

    I was on 2 injections a day for the first 3 months after my diagnosis and was overjoyed when this was changed to basal bolus which gave me so much more flexibility and control.
    If you are open to change, I would jump at it regardless of whether you start a new job working shifts I have never worked shifts and would hate to be on fixed doses now.
     
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