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Slim type 2

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Nik442, Jun 3, 2018.

  1. Nik442

    Nik442 · Well-Known Member

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    Feel like I'm losing the battle with this condition at the moment. I got a telling off at my last review in May. If I cut back on the carbs and sugars then of course my HBAC is within limits. If I introduce more carbs then my HBAC goes above limit and I'm called back for a repeat HBAC. Yet again I've cut back on the carbs and as expected I'm losing weight. I've lost 7lb in 3 weeks and now find I'm feeling weak and also need a new wardrobe. I've had this condition for 8 years, so I understand about adding more fat but the quantity required for me to maintain weight is more than a spoonful of cream or a knob of butter. Can anyone in the same position as me offer any advice on maintaining weight and HBAC? How many carbs a day (g) do you eat? I'm male and now weigh 10st 10lb. Many thanks.
     
  2. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've been following LCHF for three years - 2 months after diagnosis. I'm a slim type 2 and weight is stable at 10 stone. I try to eat as few carbs as possible - basically meat and leafy vegetables, bacon, eggs, full fat yoghurt and cream. I've really no idea how much fat I'm eating, and for me it's quite a bit of guess work. I definitely fill up with more protein as was suggested by Dr Bernstein in his book, but can't say how many calories are from fat. My HbA1c is usually around 34. You should get lots of help on here.
     
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  3. Jenny15

    Jenny15 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm an overweight T2 so I'm afraid I can't be of much help, but can I ask what your height or BMI is? A weight on its own doesn't tell me what it means relative to your height.

    I've been eating varying degrees of LCHF for most of the last 9 years. I agree that losing weight fast will make anyone feel weak and need a new wardrobe. (I always keep other-sized clothes around in case I need them again.)

    Hopefully you can find out what foods to include so you don't feel weak. Good luck.
     
  4. Nik442

    Nik442 · Well-Known Member

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    My diet is similar to yours. Also cheese and fish - white and oily fish. Been at this for 8 years but still haven't solved the long term weight loss short of upping the carbs which puts me back on the naughty step.
     
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  5. Terrytiddy

    Terrytiddy Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Morning @Nik442 welcome to the forum. I will tag @daisy1 for welcome info. I'm not slim (yet) so that bit is out for me at the moment. It can be very frustrating at times with different eating regimes and trying to find one that suits your needs. I started the Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) eating plan a month ago after a visit to my Dn and a telling off!. I fast 18/6, no food after 20.00 till 14.00 next day. Only having black tea, coffee, water and vitamin water on fast. I aim for less than 15 - 20% carbs (but I need to loose weight) I find this plan so easy and I'm never hungry. I have lost 8.4 kg and Bg down from 16.8 to 7.0. Have a look at the Low Carb thread on the forum also the "What have you eaten thread" for some nice food ideas. Do you have a Bg meter? If not I would suggest getting one, If you cannot get one from your Gp there are some on E-bay that are a reasonable price and so are the test strips. @Bluetit1802 has some info on these if you need it. You are in the right place for help, advice and support, so any questions just ask. :)
     
  6. Nik442

    Nik442 · Well-Known Member

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    BMI is 20, so technically it's very good, but doesn't tell the whole story. Last time I saw a doctor about this I was told not to worry unless it dropped under 18.
     
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  7. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    If you need to stop losing weight there are only 3 ways to do it. Increase carbs, increase fats, or increase protein.
    As it is not a good idea to increase carbs, this leaves fats and protein. There is no other way.

    I was in your position in 2014, needing to stabilise my weight before I became thin enough to fall down a grid. I also wanted to reduce my carbs to help my blood sugars. I reduced the carbs and I increased fats and protein, bit by bit until I found the right balance. I had extra eggs and cheese, extra mayo etc. I also had a glass of red wine each evening. I weighed myself every day or so, kept up my food diary including portion sizes, and finally cracked it. It took a while. I have maintained my weight ever since.
     
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  8. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Expert

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    are you very active? could you manage more cheese and full fat milk?
     
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  9. Jenny15

    Jenny15 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's not great medical advice, IMO. the healthy range is meant to be 18-25 or 20-25, depending on who you ask.

    Call me old fashioned but I think it pays to have a little bit in reserve in case you get sick and at risk of being underweight.

    Even though my BMI is about double yours at the moment (aren't people unique? LOL) I have been told by slim people that there can be just as many problems for you as there are for me. They are just different problems.

    I'm sure there are people on the forum who have grappled with this problem and they will give you some tips. All I can do is express my empathy and wish you well.
     
  10. zand

    zand Type 2 · Expert

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    I think @Pinkorchid managed to stabilise her weight by adding more nuts to her diet.
     
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  11. NicoleC1971

    NicoleC1971 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Not in your category but do help people who need to gain weight in my job..it is tricky because your body has its set point that it wants to stick to. You need to generate some little spurts of insulin to stop the body raiding your won fat supplies and store what you are eating rather than burn it. My advice would be frequent snacks of protein (does generate insulin) and fat or perhaps even a couple of crackers (if after 2 hours your bg isn't still elevated then you are tolerating this amount of carb) with some nut butter or cheese. Fat and protein are filling which is why so many people do find it easy to drop weight so I appreciate that its not easy to do so it would be great if you could have some carb.
    My thought is that carb tolerance level is very individual but if you find the right level that keeps your HBa1C in check that indicates that this is your body's natural level of fat.
    I do not know if you are underweight as you don't mention your height but are you concerned about losing muscle or do you just have a clear idea of what your 'fighting weight' is or is the worry about continuing to lose weight?
     
  12. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm T1 but I need to put on weight and can only inject for carbs in the evening to avoid post exercise hypos.

    So far I'm finding egg mayo, peanuts and some ice creams (yay!) can all be tolerated without huge spikes. Our local butcher does sausage rolls that are low on pastry and high in meat that aren't too bad BG wise.
     
  13. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    If you only put on weight when eating carbohydrates then I assume that the extra weight is fat. Which is not necessarily a good thing. Unless you have no body fat at all (or well below 5%) then you should be fine. If you are losing muscle then you may not be eating enough protein.

    If you are LCHF and feeling faint then I assume you just aren't getting enough to eat.
    Perhaps eat more snacks between meals?
    A lot depends on what you like to eat, of course.
    Simple things are lettuce leaves with full fat mayo (roll the mayo inside the leaf), hard boiled eggs (these can be chopped and mixed with mayo as well) and nuts.
    Cheese wrapped in ham.
    Avocado.

    There are loads of things to eat which are high in fat and protein.
     
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  14. OrsonKartt

    OrsonKartt Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Nuts and lots of them. Walnuts almonds and Brazil's. They are a great snack at anytime and meal substitute when needed. I also do avacodo / double cream / yogurt smoothie adding in one or two berries and vanilla for extra flavor Tastes somewhat like melted Icecream. ... Delicious ......I'm 6ft 3 inches tall. 32 inch waist and pretty constant weight of 73/74 kg.
     
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  15. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @Nik442

    Hello Nik and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it both helpful and useful. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  16. Nik442

    Nik442 · Well-Known Member

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    I don't find hunger is a problem or certainly not in the summer as I do feel full with what I'm eating so more food is a challenge. I've followed LCHF on and off for 8 years and although my HBAC drops so does my weight very quickly and therefore I increase my carbs so it's the "continuing to lose weight" that is my worry and for those close to me. Anyway, thanks for your comments which are very useful and to everyone else who replied.
     
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  17. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Nik - When diagnosed, I trrimmed right up by cutting carbs, then it took me some weeks (can't actually recall how man if I'm honest) to stabilise things I stabilised to a position whereby a skirt my way around +/- 48kg, which gives a BMI of 18.7, having just checked.

    It took a few adjustments to get to stable, I did the following:

    - Increased my portion sizes of what I had been eating
    - As a meat lover, I increased my protein a bit more
    - I increrased my fat content.

    There is a saying out there that suggests we blance our carbs to our blood glucose meters, and our fats to the bathrroom scales. It makes sense to me.

    At this stage, please don't get hung up on exact gramms of carb, or on the number calories you are consuming, because we're all very different.
     
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  18. Metabolism_Boss

    Metabolism_Boss Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I make my own nut and seed mixture and it works out at 184Kcal /oz. Nuts such as macadamia and brazil are full of calories and will not affect your carb count to any significant extent.
     
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  19. Nik442

    Nik442 · Well-Known Member

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    The question I'm asking is how low is low carb for people? I understand this is going to vary for different people.
     
  20. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Well, for me, I pretty much do as I mentioned in my original post. I eat carbs to my blood glucose meter and fats to the bathroom scales.

    If I am cutting down on carbs, for whatever reason, I consciously up the fats. If I am reducing the fats, I watch for inappropriate hunger. By inappropriate hunger, I mean hunger beyond "ready for my next meal" at the time planned.
     
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