1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Sour Dough Bread???

Discussion in 'Food, Nutrition and Recipes' started by Heretic1, Jul 22, 2016.

  1. Heretic1

    Heretic1 Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    201
    Likes Received:
    230
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I was belatedly reading a Daily Mail supplement about Low Carb diets as advocated in David Cavans book which is endorsed here.

    A number of the recipes included Sour Dough bread and it states that it has 'significant health benefits as it contains the same acids that slow down the rate at which glucose is released into the bloodstream'

    Does this mean it is acceptable - or this still viewed as 'toxic' Carb????? Just wondered.
     
  2. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,607
    Likes Received:
    1,582
    Trophy Points:
    178
    If the acids slow down carbohydrate absorption then this would have benefits but only in the same respect as a lower GI diet does.

    Carbohydrate will still be a menace on the premise that the more carbs you take in, the harder it typically is to manage your BGL.

    With regards to the word toxic, you could equally use instant action yeast with a flour that is not refined (wholemeal as opposed to white/bleached). The fibre content in wholemeal flour also slows down the absorption rate of carbohydrates due to the body trying to break down the fibre present in the flour.

    Sourdough is awesome though, I made my first starter and bread a few weeks back:) I should try a couple of slices of both sourdough and regular homemade bread and see the differences in spikes on the Libre reader.

    Regards,
    Grant
     
  3. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,956
    Likes Received:
    12,064
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I used bake sourdoughs... and dropped them when I started testing... carb rocket fuel for me..... :(
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,790
    Likes Received:
    2,408
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I have tried many sour dough breads and recipes - all but one raised my blood sugar - the one particular one is made by an artisan bakery about 2 hours drive away - I get a couple of sliced now and then and freeze them for when only that kind of bread will do - e.g. Fried bread, poached eggs. - it's expensive but worth it as a treat. If I lived nearer it would probably be my go to bread as it has minimal effect on my numbers.

    It makes me laugh as when I worked in a bakery many moons ago we made all our breads with starters in the old fashioned way - but then it was just fresh bread - no arty farty artisan labels or price tags!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    23,621
    Likes Received:
    19,618
    Trophy Points:
    278
    I'm not familiar with the author or his book but I wonder if this is what he is referring to with regards to Sourdough Bread:

    Abstract
    Sourdough bread has been reported to improve glucose metabolism in healthy subjects. In this study postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses were evaluated in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who had a meal containing sourdough bread leavened with lactobacilli, in comparison to a reference meal containing bread leavened with baker yeast. Sixteen IGT subjects (age range 52–75, average BMI 29.9 ± 4.2 kg/m²) were randomly given a meal containing sourdough bread (A) and a meal containing the reference bread (B) in two separate occasions at the beginning of the study and after 7 days. Sourdough bread was leavened for 8 h using a starter containing autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae and several bacilli able to produce a significant amount of d-and l-lactic acid, whereas the reference bread was leavened for 2 h with commercial baker yeast containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were measured at time 0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min. In IGT subjects sourdough bread induced a significantly lower plasma glucose response at 30 minutes (p = 0.048) and a smaller incremental area under curve (AUC) Δ 0–30 and Δ 0–60 min (p = 0.020 and 0.018 respectively) in comparison to the bread leavened with baker yeast. Plasma insulin response to this type of bread showed lower values at 30 min (p = 0.045) and a smaller AUC Δ 0–30 min (p = 0.018). This study shows that in subjects with IGT glycaemic and insulinaemic responses after the consumption of sourdough bread are lower than after the bread leavened with baker yeast. This effect is likely due to the lactic acid produced during dough leavening as well as the reduced availability of simple carbohydrates. Thus, sourdough bread may potentially be of benefit in subjects with impaired glucose metabolism.

    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00592-008-0029-8
     
  6. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    14,945
    Likes Received:
    10,736
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Well if you had a way of checking your blood glucose you could buy some and test yourself before and 1 and 2 hours after eating some to see the effect it had on your blood glucose. Then you would know for sure if it is suitable for you. Personally I have had only 1 piece of bread since diagnosis (in a fancy restaurant that I know had great bread) and 1 Lidl high protein roll.
    The lidl roll only caused a small spike ( I did have it with butter and bacon) but even so I know that the lure of bread would be too strong if I were to eat it regularly so its not an option for me.
    The eat and test method is what we mean by eating to your meter and will give you excellent insight into the foods which cause a rise in blood sugar for many its the first line of defence..
    Hope that helps
    Mark
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  7. phil1966

    phil1966 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    661
    Likes Received:
    5,849
    Trophy Points:
    158
    I'd agree with this - everyone reacts differently so the only way to know for sure is to try it and check after. I can eat Burgen bread or Lidl protein rolls with no issues at all and good quality wholemeal with only a small spike. However, spelt bread (which is supposed to have a lower GI and therefore be digested slower) spikes me high immediately. Sour Dough for me is pretty much the same as wholemeal with regard to its effect on my BS, i.e. far better than white bread (which I don't go anywhere near) but not as good as burgen, but someone else might be completely different in their reactions to various foods
     
  8. Favabean

    Favabean Prediabetes · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Pre-diagnosis I baked sourdough bread, bagels, buns, biscuits, etc. all the time. Still have the sourdough culture at the back of my fridge! Post-diagnosis, no matter what I tried - long proofing time, all whole wheat flour, adding fat, fibre, and protein (e.g. eggs, butter, seeds) - it was still AWFUL for my blood sugar. So no more sourdough for me! I didn't compare it against fast acting yeast bread. Maybe sourdough is better, but it's not good enough for me.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook