1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Steel cap work boots

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by TURTLE, Feb 10, 2018.

  1. TURTLE

    TURTLE Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hi
    Does anyone have any information on Steel toe boots at work ?
    Myself and a colleague are to be issued with these boots at work and be both know the importance of foot protection at all times especially at work but not so much for me but my colleague has really poor feet and has had issues with these heavy uncomfortable shoes doing more damage that protection, is there any exemptions for wearing these ?
    I have suggested signing a disclaimer but they say we can't do this and have to wear them.
    Any thoughts ?
     
  2. Bittern

    Bittern Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    132
    Trophy Points:
    103
    There is a vast variety of such steel toe footwear ranging from trainer type to full boots suitable for foundry use some are very comfortable some less so. Could you explain your problem to your employer and see if they will allow you to chose a suitable boot? There may be a cost penalty and if so they may allow you to make up the difference so long as the footwear meets the required specification. Trust me they are well worth wearing when your feet are at risk. Depending on your job it may be possible to only wear them when on site and revert to normal shoes in the office. Clearly I have no idea what your job is or your industry but it's worth a try.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    5,026
    Likes Received:
    3,643
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi @TURTLE

    I work in engineering and believe that your employer has a right to insist that you wear them. I've been denied access to some areas of our factory by workshop foremen when I forgot to put the Toe-Tectors on before leaving the office.

    However, protective footwear comes in all shapes and sizes these days. I shunned the freebie heavy shoes that my employer provides and bought my own - very lightweight, and fairly comfortable (as safety shoes go.)

    Have a search on line for Arco Lightweight Safety Shoes (other makes are available). The reinforcements are made from composite materials - so not steel capped - which is where the weight saving comes from. Was lucky to find mine reduced in a sale - they were just under £20. Some local tool trade counters stock this brand so you can try before you buy.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  4. paulus1

    paulus1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    513
    Trophy Points:
    133
    as urban says if your required to wear them your emloyer would end up in trouble. iworked in a cementry landscaping it we were re setting an old very bighead stone. 6 folks with giant crowbars. anyway i ended up with a ton of stone lying across my toes. im very confident if iwas wearing trainers they would have been a mess.
     
  5. bangkokdiabetic

    bangkokdiabetic Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    197
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Steel Toe Capped footwear is there as a protection to your feet in case of an accident what type of work do you do that requires boots There are different types of steel Toe capped Footwear available which are not so cumbersome It may be that you need Boots for a reason depending on your job which prevents you wearing steel toe capped Trainers for instance Beware if your friend has an accident when not wearing them it can effect any compensation claim he may have.
     
  6. hh1

    hh1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,216
    Likes Received:
    2,115
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Might also be worth considering whether your friend's feet count as a disability, in which case your employer would have to make reasonable adjustment for him, which in this case could well mean your employer supplying more suitable, though equally protective, footwear. Just a thought....
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,280
    Likes Received:
    11,483
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi @TURTLE ,

    PPE equipment such as boots are are provided by an employer by law.
    Of course you can also supply your own boots, which will also comply with health & safty.

    I work in an industry where PPE equipment is manditory. Occasionally someone like your colleague has an issue & the employer will contribute to bespoke safty foot wear, but only to the cost of what they would pay for the company issue boots..?

    There are also "insoles" that can be bought to increase foot support & comfort with these boots.

    Hope this helps!?
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. TURTLE

    TURTLE Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hi & thanks for your comments.
    I have researched the more "lightweight & comfortable" shoes and for me that should be the answer, I am 90% office based but occasionally have to venture into stores area which is not a really dangerous area but the company is really big on H&S and stipulate safety shoes should be worn.
    I am more interested in people who have worn these shoes for long periods and has it caused any damage to their feet for wearing them ?. I am a diabetic of 37yrs and my feet are pretty good but just have this nagging thought that shoes designed primarily for reasons that are obvious I would hate to create problems at this stage with my toes through ill fitting heavy shoes.
    Speaking to other employees that wear these shoes all but one say the are horrible and uncomfortable and some have paid extra for so called lightweight trainer type.....any recommendations from Type 1's who wear a really comfortable pair of shoes.
    I have found a website "Englebert-Strauss" that seem to do decent ones....anybody tried a pair ?
     
  9. jcbman

    jcbman I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    97
    Trophy Points:
    68
    Only way is to get down to the local builders merchant, or get your bosses to get you some samples in from whoever they buy off. There is always a good choice, good range now, half sizes, different width fittings, composite rather than steel if you want lightweight, to be honest you sound like you just need an office shoe, or black trainers, but you got to put your feet in them to find out if they fit you.
     
  10. Debzz_

    Debzz_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    176
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I work at a foundry ( not in production) I have to wear safety footwear . I have the trainer type which are the lightest . You need to wear good quality socks . I don’t have any problems at all .
     
  11. Japes

    Japes LADA · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    Likes Received:
    3,373
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I wear an extra pair of insoles in my safety boots + extra thick socks. I also moisturise feet at night if I've been in the safety boots all day. When I got issued a new pair recently, I was consulted over the most suitable pair, as the need for me to be extra careful was duly noted.

    It's mandatory for me to wear boots if I'm with students in either of the workshops we work in and I'm not taking any chances with my feet, either from a safety point of view or a diabetic point of view.
     
  12. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

    Messages:
    8,782
    Likes Received:
    5,260
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I wore safety footwear for years and my feet were very happy in them - but I always wore a pair of thin cotton socks underneath home made wool ones, for just one day and then washed them, and I always wore the same style and make - they were lace up full shoes. When someone I worked with wanted a slip on style they were useless as they did not stay on her feet and the construction and shape were completely different so you do need to have them to try on and get them swapped if they are wrong. Some of the styles have narrower toes than others and they can be really painful and cause dreadful damage so you have to insist on a good fit with the socks you need to wear in them.
     
  13. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,079
    Likes Received:
    4,830
    Trophy Points:
    178
    For an office worker that needs boots for just venturing out of the office you might find slip on riggers boots useful. I use them for my morning walk which involves woodland. I won't claim that they are lightweight but they are very easy to step into and very comfortable when you do. I wear extra thick socks so they don't slop about when in rough ground.

    I have never worn them all day (but I suppose riggers do) so I can't say what that is like but I wouldn't anticipate trouble.

    I bought mine in Wickes for £30+ so they are not too expensive. I won't give details for fear of sounding like an advert.

    EDIT: I just checked Wickes to find they do two makes of rigger boots. The ones I own are made by Scruffs but I guess the other make is just as good.
     
    #13 Squire Fulwood, Feb 11, 2018 at 6:36 AM
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2018
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook