1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Taking the plunge (Newbie to monitoring) Advice

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Tim1966, Feb 4, 2020.

  1. Tim1966

    Tim1966 Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    63
    A little back history,

    Was diagnosed beginning of September 19

    Hba1C - 77
    Weight 130kg
    BMI 44.9
    Exercise - Sedentary (almost stopped!)
    Metformin - 2 tablets twice a day prescribed

    Immediately researched diagnosis / diet etc switched to moderate to low (hopefully healthy) carbs of approx 80 - 100g a day and low calorie 1200 - 1500kcals a day. Currently I stick to this using a 16:8 fasting approach with the majority of my calories coming in the early evening (7.00pm ish) during the week and a slightly more spread out approach over the weekend.

    October 19
    Hba1C - 47
    Weight - 119kg
    BMI - 41.1
    Exercise - 3km brisk walk a day
    Metformin - 2 tablets twice a day continuing

    February 20
    Hba1C - Just tested, results at the end of the week!
    Weight - 96.1kg
    BMI - 33.3
    Exercise - 6km brisk walk per day

    I am hoping that my a1c reading will have come down again but more importantly after a lot of reading on here and reading posts with advice from some of the experts on here, I have come to the conclusion that I really do need to be more proactive in terms of understanding what is going on in my body. I have ordered the Gluco-navii meter from home health along with strips which should arrive by the weekend.

    I think my initial testing regimen needs to be as follows

    On waking
    Before lunch then 2 hours after
    Before evening meal then 2 hours after which will also be pretty close to bedtime.

    Does this sound reasonable or is there something I am missing/not doing. Are there any ;tips' for making it effective. NB I really love use apps to track what I am doing so I am adicted t my fitness pal for food / macro tracking and have downloaded mysugr in preparation for the meter to arrive (I am keen to see an estimate of hba1c in this app as it annoys having to wait for a full three months with no feedback.

    I have read a lot of posts discussing similar questions but just trying to get some definitive advice!

    Sorry for the long post but any help/advice would be appreciated.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  2. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,404
    Likes Received:
    18,807
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi @Tim1966

    Congratulations on great progress so far.

    Your proposed testing regime will give you some important information about the impact of what you eat on your blood sugars.

    Depending on what you’re eating you may want to consider testing additionally at the 1 hour and 3 hour mark. If your meal includes a lot of fat then any peak can be delayed so sometimes you might miss a peak if only testing at 2 hours. Likewise something relatively more carby might have a rapid spike.

    It can also be instructive to test before and after exercise - if you’re anything like me, some things (lifting weights for example) might temporarily raise levels whereas others (swimming in my case) will reliably bring them right down.

    The important thing is to be consistent so that you’re comparing like with like and track progress.

    If it’s within your means, use of a Libre sensor - even just for one two week period - can be very helpful in showing what is going on throughout the day. It has certainly shown me some unexpected results and a couple of foods that might have passed muster if testing only at the two hour mark are now firmly out of bounds list!

    Let us know how you get on.
     
  3. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,542
    Likes Received:
    16,158
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi Tim and welcome to the forum! Well done on your progress so far!
    Just a comment on the MySugr app, which I love! The HbA1c estimate, is just that an estimate. I have found comparing it to my lab HbA1cs it has been up to 5 mmol/mol lower. However it is really good tool for watching trends up or down.
     
  4. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,312
    Likes Received:
    16,110
    Trophy Points:
    198
    If you eat breakfast you should probably be testing before and after that too.

    And it's useful to be aware of other issues that may be affecting glucose levels, such as exercise, stress, illness, pain, some medications (e.g statins, corticosteroids). So sometimes it's worth doing extra tests for these if the need arises.

    Watch for patterns and trends - for me these are often more informative than actual numbers.

    And I'd certainly agree about using a Libre sensor, even if only for a month or two, as it can show you in far greater detail what's going on. My sensors also regularly read lower than glucose testing but the patterns have been very similar, and its HbA1c predictions (and those of my meter averages used with our diabetes.co.uk HbA1c calculator) have always been lower than my actual HbA1c test results - though again they are consistent in those differences.
     
  5. Tim1966

    Tim1966 Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Thanks for the tips everyone there is some really useful information there. I am very interested in the Libre Freestyle but as far as I could tell it was not possible to buy one at the moment due to shortages. It is certainly something I will look to the future dependent on how things go.
     
  6. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

    Messages:
    8,804
    Likes Received:
    5,272
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I just used a simple meter as it was pretty obvious - eat carbs - whoosh, eat salad and stirfry just wait for the clunk as levels drop to normal.
    I was seeing 8mmol/l after meals, two hours from first bite, so I stopped testing beforehand, just ate twice a day, and saw my numbers drop below 7 - which seems to keep me consistently at Hba1c of 42, which I think is good enough.
     
  7. Tim1966

    Tim1966 Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Okay, so my bg meter arrived today. I tested before my evening meal and got a reading of 5.8 mmol/l this was immediately after a 40 minute brisk 4.5km walk.

    Two hours after my meal it was 5.5 mmol. I was expecting it to go up! Would the exercise have been a factor?

    Evening meal 180g Piri Piri chicken, vegetable antipasto (olives peppers sun dried tomato onion courgette in olive oil dressing) apple and 40g roast almonds.

    Need help interpreting!!
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  8. Quinn1066

    Quinn1066 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    283
    Likes Received:
    918
    Trophy Points:
    153
    I find that exercise, even a little walk raises my blood glucose, especially before eating. Supposedly exercising after eating is good way to use the glucose that is circulating in the system after food.
     
  9. MollieB

    MollieB · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    8
    The one thing I usually recommend to people poke your finger more off to the side and not on the tip of your finger, particularly since you are new to testing. Your fingertips are among the most sensitive area of your body. They are densely packed with thousands of nerve endings. I'm not sure that the side of the finger has less but the sides of your fingers has less direct contact with things in day to day life so in the long run it seems to hurt less.
     
  10. Tim1966

    Tim1966 Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    12
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Thanks to everyone above.

    I got my latest HBA1C result today

    Sept 2019 - 77
    Oct 2019 - 47
    Feb 2020 - 34

    I am absolutely delighted as I thought one or two excesses over Christmas would have had more of an impact. The excellent advice on here about significantly reducing carbs has certainly really helped me.
     
    • Winner Winner x 4
  11. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,404
    Likes Received:
    18,807
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Fantastic news!
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook