1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2022 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Type 2 "The Obesity Code and or "The Diabetes Code"

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by snametab, Jan 27, 2022.

  1. snametab

    snametab Prediabetes · Member

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    23
    This posting is NOT applicable to Type 1 diabetes.

    I am finding it very difficult to search on this forum so apologise if this has been posted before. I see a lot on the forum about what should be eaten but more importantly appears to be time between the intake of food. The NHS seems to be obssessed about controlling blood sugars but as increased insulin, increases insulin resistance which then leads to more fat they are not focusing on 'fasting'. The reason they don't focus on that in the USA is because 'Pharma' and 'Food' are heavily involved with the medical profession. Insulin makes you fat, not the food.

    Can anyone argue against the following which is fully supported by scientific evidence/studies over the decades in the books writen by Dr Jason Fung "The Obesity Code'' and The Diabetes Code"?

    "At its very core, intermittent fasting simply allows the body to use its stored energy, by burning off excess body fat.


    It is important to realize that this is normal and humans have evolved to fast for shorter time periods – hours or days – without detrimental health consequences.


    Body fat is merely food energy that has been stored away. If you don’t eat, your body will simply “eat” its own fat for energy.

    Life is about balance. The good and the bad, the yin and the yang. The same applies to eating and fasting. Fasting, after all, is simply the flip side of eating. If you are not eating, you are fasting.


    Here’s how it works:

    When we eat, more food energy is ingested than can immediately be used. Some of this energy must be stored away for later use. Insulin is the key hormone involved in the storage of food energy.


    There is, however, very limited storage space for carbohydrates; and once that is reached, the liver starts to turn the excess glucose into fat. This process is called de-novo lipogenesis (meaning literally “making new fat”).


    Some of this newly created fat is stored in the liver, but most of it is exported to other fat deposits in the body. While this is a more complicated process, there is almost no limit to the amount of fat that can be created.

    So, two complementary food energy storage systems exist in our bodies. One is easily accessible but with limited storage space (glycogen), and the other is more difficult to access but has almost unlimited storage space (body fat).


    The process goes in reverse when we do not eat. Insulin levels fall, signaling the body to start burning stored energy because no more is coming through food. Blood glucose falls, so the body must now pull glucose out of storage to burn for energy.

    Glycogen is the most easily accessible energy source. It is broken down into glucose molecules to provide energy for the body’s other cells. This can provide enough energy to power much of the body’s needs for 24-36 hours. After that, the body will primarily be breaking down fat for energy.


    So the body only really exists in two states – the fed state and the fasted state. Either we are storing food energy (increasing stores), or we are burning stored energy (decreasing stores). It’s one or the other. If eating and fasting are balanced, then there should be no net weight change.

    If we start eating the minute we roll out of bed and do not stop until we go to sleep, we spend almost all our time in the fed state. Over time, we may gain weight because we have not allowed our body any time to burn stored food energy.


    To restore balance or to lose weight, we may simply need to increase the amount of time spent burning food energy.


    That’s intermittent fasting.

    In essence, intermittent fasting allows the body to use its stored energy. The important thing to understand is that there is nothing wrong with that. That is how our bodies are designed. That’s what dogs, cats, lions and bears do. That’s what humans do.

    If you’re eating every third hour, as is often recommended, then your body will constantly use the incoming food energy. It may not need to burn much body fat, if any. You may just be storing fat.


    Your body may be saving it for a time when there is nothing to eat."
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  2. Ronancastled

    Ronancastled Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    999
    Likes Received:
    629
    Trophy Points:
    153
    Had to dig a bit there to find the question.
    No, I can't argue against it, too many posters on here with great testimonials on IF/OMAD/5:2

    This old adage about 2,000 Calories & breakfast being the most important meal is just feeding the epidemic.
    This dogma won't shift in our lifetimes, we'll still be considered a fad fringe no matter how loud we shout.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  3. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,517
    Likes Received:
    812
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Sorry I cannot argue against the points you have made.
    I am intrigued why you feel "This posting is NOT applicable to Type 1 diabetes."
    Type 1 diabetes does not stop us getting insulin resistance or becoming obese.
    I am very aware that Type 1 and type 2 are completely different conditions but that does not mean your thread is not applicable to those of us with Type 1.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,575
    Likes Received:
    2,091
    Trophy Points:
    178
    It's not only about time. Even if you fast, what you eat, and how much you eat during the non fasting time is still important, probably more so.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Winner Winner x 1
    #4 Mr_Pot, Jan 27, 2022 at 9:23 AM
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2022
  5. snametab

    snametab Prediabetes · Member

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    23
    It is not what I feel it is that Dr Fung's two books only address Type 2 Diabetes and he makes that clear.
     
  6. snametab

    snametab Prediabetes · Member

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Agreed, exclude all processed food and sugar and eating low carb food which decreases appetite.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Gill63

    Gill63 · Member

    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Thank you. This is a simple explanation.
     
  8. Member496333

    Member496333 · Guest

    I have only read The Diabetes Code and would politely disagree with your first statement. Although obviously the motivation to do so will be understandably less, I think everyone could benefit from reading these books. Don’t forget type 1 and type 2 are not mutually exclusive. Even non-diabetics might find it all very eye opening and may adjust their dietary habits for the better. I know some people don’t put much stock in Fung’s theories but the guy saved my life. Certainly my feet and eyesight, so personally I’m a huge fan.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. snametab

    snametab Prediabetes · Member

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    23
    These are Dr Fung's words I have quoted them so can't take any praise for the simplicity of the explanation just hope it
    helps people understand. thanks
     
  10. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

    Messages:
    13,308
    Likes Received:
    16,080
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Noo, I cannot dispute your question
    I can't because I would be in deep trouble with my life of I didn't!
    I have RH,
    I am carb intolerant!
    And I create too much insulin, if I eat a certain amount of carbs or sugers.
    I have to be in or around normal blood glucose levels.
    And that is why I agree,!
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook