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Tips For Managing Levels When Cycling.

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by ade2020, Jan 27, 2020.

  1. ade2020

    ade2020 Type 2 · Member

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    Hello

    Newbie diagnosed and a keen cyclist although last year only managed 93 hrs on the bike.

    So to kickstart my year of cycling I signed up to do Tour Of Flanders Sportive in April 108 miles distance.So joined a spin class to get my training underway and road miles a few times a week with longer weekend rides.

    I have all manner of questions regarding managing my diabetes while out on the bike. Not had official diagnosis of type 1 or 2 yet which is probably premature posting this.

    Any tips on what others folks do to manage their levels etc gratefully appreciated.

    Thanks in advance.

    Ade.
     
  2. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    It would help if you told us what medication you are on.
     
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  3. KK123

    KK123 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @ade2020, I think it's hard to answer your question without knowing what type and what medication because exercise as an insulin user warrants a different approach to exercise on no meds, or exercise as a type 2 on meds or without and so on.
     
  4. LittleGreyCat

    LittleGreyCat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Firstly, what did you do before you were diagnosed?
    Or had you stopped cycling prior to diagnosis?

    I think you probably have to get your non-cycling eating regime sorted out and then see what, if anything, you have to modify for long distance cycling.

    Welcome to the forum.
     
  5. ade2020

    ade2020 Type 2 · Member

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    Hello

    For the time being I am on 6mg Apidra 3 times a day before breakfast, lunch and dinner, and Levemir background twice a day 9mg. Diabetic nurse told me to up my morning Apidra as glucose levels still in double figures for part of the day.

    I did two big rides of 100 miles last year and trans cambrian 3 day bikepacking in October on my cyclecross bike which was very hard and I struggled compared to the guys I was with albeit they were14 years younger as I'm 55 they are 41.

    Last ride of any note was 4th Jan 62k without eating anything and I felt awful and was showing signs/symptoms of diabetes.

    So as you guys mentioned need to no for sure what if type 1 or 2 and what meds I end up on.

    Background info useful though how others manage themselves and what they fuel up on during a ride and do they stop to test the levels.

    Thanks Ade
     
  6. jjraak

    jjraak Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @ade2020

    the two ailments have real differences in treatment as mentioned.

    I do have a friend on here who cycles, who may be able to shed some light on how he manages
    @Muddy Cyclist ..i believe more the off road, but i maybe wrong, either way you might find his input useful.

    good luck with test results.
     
  7. ade2020

    ade2020 Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks for that had a bs nice result 6.7 so good to be back with normal parameters.

    Wondering if I have to take after a Moroccan ultra long distance runner who snacks on chunks of fatty lamb
     
  8. Walking Girl

    Walking Girl Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I’m a T2, no meds, so this may not have any application to you, but, When I’m going out to hike distances, I’m better off with eating some fats along the way. Handful of nuts to nut butter with some whole fruit v a hit of glucose. That way the slide up or down seems to be more smooth not a a big spike up or down. Generally speaking, I get a much bigger spike on an empty stomach from intense exercise than with food in my stomach. I would say I personally feel I’d rather run a bit high v a bit low during an endurance exercise.

    also, be watchful for 24 hours afterwards because intense or prolonged exercise can increase insulin sensitivity for up to 24 hours after. After a really hard lifting session, I can eat 50g of carbs and barely see a spike.

    assuming you don’t have a pump, then yes, I would certainly take the time to stop and test. Lows can hit in a flash as you might not really feel it until it is right on you.
     
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  9. Jollymon

    Jollymon Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I’m a rider. I enjoy time on my bike. I like to hit it in the morning before breakfast, when I don’t have a ton of onboard insulin and this helps avoid lows. I also do this to destroy dawn phenomenon.

    For afternoon rides I typically struggle. Too much active insulin is a problem, so I’m typically feeding it.

    I use a pump, so I’m not using a long acting basal insulin. For rides, I cut my basal rate in half.

    For numbers, I still shoot for normal. I find I have more power near normal blood sugar in my legs. My fuel consumption is about 12 carbs per hour if everything it working right. If I have high numbers, obviously I have to stop and fix something and then not eat. This can be frustrating at times- I enjoy to work hard, and then eat. If I know I’m out of it, I’d drop back and go at my own pace- I know this means more work to not be in the group.
     
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  10. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Most T1's use a basal/bolus regime like you are on (basal your Levemir, bolus your Apidra to take with meals). You are on fixed doses for now, but this treatment is designed to be flexible after some learning: Most of us choose our doses depending on the amount of carbs we'll eat in the next meal, on our current blood glucose levels, and, very importantly, on the amount and intensity of any exercise we've planned!

    Learning to do so takes time, studying, note keeping and lots of trial and error. In the UK many T1's are offered a DAFNE course, where you learn about those things.

    I think for now you'd best ask your diabetes nurse how you may adjust for training, and if you do train, test an awful lot (like every half hour and more if you feel off). All the testing may prevent you from going low, and it will give you more insight as to how much food you need while training to stay at somewhat healthy levels.

    Keep your bag full of both quick acting hypo treatment like glucotabs, coke, jelly babies (I like undiluted lemonade if I want my bag as light as possible, works very quick and you only need a little but it tastes horrible), and carbs that keep you going for a bit longer like bread, banana's, mars bars, whatever.
    And tell whoever is with you if you're not training alone.

    Good luck, and be careful!
     
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  11. ade2020

    ade2020 Type 2 · Member

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    Hi very useful and valuable information and answers my questions on a thread I've just added.

    Currently trying to figure out how to make my wahoo elemnt bolt set up reminder alerts for every 30 mins to check my levels

    Much appreciate yours and everyones input. I am thinking 108 mile in April for Tour of Flanders sportive is a bridge to far so will opt for 130km distance instead.
     
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