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Type 1: flying to New Zealand?

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by EvaVic, Jan 20, 2017.

  1. EvaVic

    EvaVic Type 1 · Member

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    I'm heading off to New Zealand in a few months and would like to know if I can carry food into the country with me. We aren't doing any stop overs. When travelling to USA years ago the sniffer dog found me and I was asked was I carry any food. When I said I had diabetes I was told that was ok.

    Also any advice on how to cover my injections. I am currently on four injections a day using Tresiba and Novorapid.

    I intend talking to the team before I go but it would be nice to have some info before I go.
     
  2. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    #2 Tipetoo, Jan 20, 2017 at 1:09 AM
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2017
  3. EvaVic

    EvaVic Type 1 · Member

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  4. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Your welcome here is a couple moore links to the NZ High Commision in London

    Main page:

    https://www.mfat.govt.nz/en/countries-and-regions/europe/united-kingdom/new-zealand-high-commission/

    This link is for what you have to declare in the Biosecurity bit:

    https://www.mfat.govt.nz/en/countri...zealand-high-commission/customs-requirements/

    Here;s the passenger arrival form that has to be filled in correctly as you get in deep #[email protected]# if section five is not correct:

    http://www.customs.govt.nz/news/resources/forms/Documents/Passenger Arrival Card English language version.pdf
     
  5. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    @EvaVic With a long flight like that, you'll need to work out how to move your injection times with the help of your team.

    What time do you usually have your Tresiba?
     
  6. fionaclare

    fionaclare Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    NZer here, easiest to remember:

    - declare all food at the border.
    - don't try and bring in fresh food stuffs - this includes honey
    - processed, packaged food is normally ok as long as it is unopened
    - if in doubt ask at the border and declare

    If you are coming into Auckland there is a supermarket very close to the airport if you need to pick up supplies.
     
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  7. isjoberg

    isjoberg Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @EvaVic how long will you be in NZ for? When I went to Japan I switched my lantus from morning to evening (was only on long acting once a day plus novorapid to top up) but travelling with levemir I matched my morning and evening dose (they're a few units apart normally) the night before I flew and then when I landed switched to my usual doses at the local time. I mainly struggle with highs so kept testing way more than usual and a lot of smaller bolus doses to keep it in control, I found staying up all night then sleeping at relatively normal local time the next day sorted me right out!
     
  8. rachiej

    rachiej Type 1 · Newbie

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    I'm from NZ and there are very strict laws about bringing food stuffs into NZ. Just declare everything. I've taken low carb snacks before, like nuts, Peperami sticks and cheese. MAF offices will inspect these and I think they even let me carry them through.
     
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  9. snowleopard

    snowleopard Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I recently returned from a couple of months in Australia. I had no problems with packaged snacks, i.e. jelly babies and oat biscuits. Just in case, get a letter from your team saying you need to have food with you at all times.

    The time zone change is a potential problem. My team advised keeping the basal to the same GMT time but I felt that would screw up my bolus sensitivity ratios so I chose to adjust my bolus time in 3-hour increments, i.e. a 21-hour interval going out and 27 hours coming back. By adjusting the time on my bolus-advice meter I kept my BS under control. I also tested frequently on the flights.

    One good piece of advice I picked up on here was to get my doctor to issue a repeat prescription which I was told I would be able to use at an Australian chemist if I needed it. The supplies I took with me lasted fine so I didn't need to test whether a pharmacist would dispense a UK prescription. Bear in mind you would pay full price for supplies (equivalent to e.g. 50p per test strip).
     
  10. AndyS

    AndyS Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was in Australia and NZ in Sept/Oct last year and had no problems with carrying my Lucozade tablets.

    I think they are more concerned with fresh produce, but best to double check.
    In both places the customs forms pretty much needed me to tick yes to a couple of things but when questioned I just told them it was for T1, they just asked if I had a prescription for it (copy of my repeat slip) and they didn't even need to see them, I was just waved through.

    /A
     
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