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Type 2 and beta blockers

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by catherinecherub, Jan 3, 2009.

  1. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    Have been having trouble with higher than normal readings two hours after breakfast. Put it down to the dawn phenomenom but now think it is the beta blockers I have recently been prescribed.
    I take these when I get up and then have my breakfast. Prior to the beta blockers, never had a problem with this reading.
    I have experimented and taken them at different times during the day and sure enough, my readings are all within normal range except for the one two hours after the beta blockers.
    Have just looked on the site recommended by Katharine, http://www.dsolve.com and there it says under the heading, HOW TO LOOK AFTER YOURSELF WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES, that beta blockers and diuretics increase insulin resistance in some people.
    Anyone else had this problem?
     
  2. Trinkwasser

    Trinkwasser · Well-Known Member

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    Beta blockers are normally contrandicated with diabetes, and they are seldom used for BP control either: if that's what you have them for an ACE would be first choice (cheaper) and if that gives you symptoms, principally a cough, an ARB (more expensive but some authorities consider them oreferable and especially so for diabetics): these both have kidney protective side effects
     
  3. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

    my bp medication is always being changed. I will have good control for about 4 months on medication and then it goes high again. I think I have been offered every medication there is but am now on beta blocker and ARB. Will be seeing GP next week. Highest reading without medication was 237/150 so have to be monitored regularly. I think it is a genetic problem.
     
  4. Trinkwasser

    Trinkwasser · Well-Known Member

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    OK if they've been through the usual sequence maybe you don't have a choice! I know some people have been given a combination of ACE and ARB (mainly in the States)

    Mother was previously on a combination of candesartan (ARB) and felodipine (CCB) until her BG dropped low and the hospital discontinued the ARB: strange choice thought both our GP and I and probably done for reasons of cost.

    After a year or so she started collecting fluid and her BP began yoyoing, the GP took her off the CCB and restarted her on a low dose of candesartan alone and her BP dropped spectacularly. So yes it can take a lot of balancing especially if there are diuretics involved, one of those cases where you can never have too many second opinions!
     
  5. Erin

    Erin Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I hate antihypertensives. Like Beta Blockers we may as well adore Big Pharma, instead of exercise, weight loss, and good blood sugar control. I am still suffering from the a side effect that felt like a stroke or heart attack, on a tiny dose.
     
  6. LaoDan

    LaoDan Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was put on both, a beta blocker and an ACE inhibitor after diagnosis. I could run on the treadmill until exhaustion and my heart rate would never go above 170. Doc pulled the beta blocker after I started getting control. The ACE changed my heartbeat from a thump, to more of a squish lol. Doc may pull the ACE at my next appointment. As far as I can tell, neither had an effect on my blood glucose levels
     
  7. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    It very much depends on which beta blocker you are taking. Atenolol being the one to avoid.

    https://gpnotebook.com/simplepage.cfm?ID=x20120516081816351223

    Beta blockers in diabetes and insulin resistance:

    • studies, such as the Losartan Intervention for Endpoint Reduction in Hypertension Study (LIFE) (3) with atenolol, the Carvedilol or Metoprolol European Trial (COMET) (4) with metoprolol have shown a 22% to 28% increase of new-onset diabetes with traditional beta beta-blockers that can increase insulin resistance (and hence hyperglycaemia) (5)
    • side effects of beta -blockers in the patient with diabetes include increased insulin resistance with worsening glycemic control
    • increased frequency of hypoglycemia and its lack of recognition can also be a problem in the insulin-deficient patient but is a minimal problem with the patient with type 2 diabetes (5)
    • there is evidence that some beta-blockers may have 'insulin-sensitising properties' (5)
      • carvedilol, a nonselective beta-blocker had vasodilating and insulin-sensitizing properties, and is the ideal beta-blocker for the patient with diabetes (5)
      • carvedilol is a third generation beta-blocker in comparison with atenolol which is a second generation beta blocker
     
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