1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2020 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Type 2 Diabetic rebel...had a wake up call

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by matildamay_, Apr 13, 2016.

  1. matildamay_

    matildamay_ Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Good Morning

    I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2013. I will admit I have been going through so many other things; menopause, depression and anxiety that after at first being in total denial, I then went on to be a rebel. I confess I am a sugar addict and food is my comfort. To be told I could no longer enjoy eating foods I want was the last straw for me, on top of everything else. So, like any good rebel I continued to ignore my rising blood sugar levels. I felt fine so I was fine right?

    Erm, actually no

    I put everything down to menopause and depression and continued to completely ignore my diabetes. I was continually unwell; tired, dizzy and feeling sick.

    Recently I have started to experience episodes of feeling like I was going to blackout, mostly after eating. I had a particular bad episode that meant I had to get picked up from work as I didn't feel safe to drive. I went to the doctors yesterday and she checked my blood sugar which was 2 hours after breakfast. It was 19.2 !! Now I'm not completely comfortable with testing as I've never done it, but when I was told it should be below 8.5, I realised I was in trouble.

    So, from that I have finally decided to grow up and take it seriously. I'm no youngster, I'm almost 45 with 4 sons ranging from 19 to 24 yrs. I'm not stupid but with this I have been. My family history is full of diabetes, cancer and early onset heart disease (mother had angina from 38 resulting in a heart attack at 40 and a triple heart bypass at 42!).

    I will admit it, I can't do this alone, I need help. I am very lucky to have a very supportive hubby and children. I feel like I need the help of people 'in the know', so I've signed up to this forum and already it's been an eye opener for me. I have read with interest how others deal with their diabetes and everything that goes with it. I have also decided that I'm going to sign up to the testing programme and study hard about diabetes. I want to live to see my grandchildren and with a whole body, not with parts of me missing.

    After all of that I do have an actual question and that is; when I have eaten something that raises my sugar levels, how do I then lower it?

     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • Hug Hug x 1
  2. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,966
    Likes Received:
    33,693
    Trophy Points:
    298
    @matildamay_ Hello and Welcome to the forum. Well, you could do some exercise as this helps to lower blood sugars, drink plenty of water - it helps to flush out your system and stabilize the glucose in your bloodstream.
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  3. matildamay_

    matildamay_ Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Good Morning

    Thanks for your response.

    Yes, I read about exercise but what about when I am at work? I will need to let them know how to best help me if I fall ill at work.


     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

    Messages:
    24,931
    Likes Received:
    30,471
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Hi and welcome to the forum,

    It is never too late to start to take control, and you are in the right place for all the help and support you need. Well done, you have taken the first steps.

    You ask how you can lower your levels post meal. Some people exercise if they find their levels have gone up too much after eating. You can try this. A good brisk walk, or even running up and down the stairs several times. However, it doesn't work for everyone, me included. The best action is not to let the levels rise too much in the first place, and that means cutting those carbs right down. All carbs convert to glucose once inside the system, and glucose is what we diabetics do not want in our blood stream.

    Do have a good read round and see how everyone is dealing with this, and ask questions.

    Good luck.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Funny Funny x 1
  5. amgrundy

    amgrundy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,333
    Likes Received:
    4,470
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Hi matildamay, First of all welcome to the forum and this fabulous website, believe me you are in the best place to be at this time. Ask as many questions as you like, there are so many supportive nice people on here who will try and answer your questions, and advise you if they can. I was diagnosed in Jan this year with a reading of 19.3. I was devastated like you and everyone else too. I had not been well for a long time and always put it down to the stress of my husbands motorbike accident [ which has left him disabled] and then the death of my only son a few years ago also in a motorbike accident.] I found this brilliant site which has helped me as I could not have got to where I am today without this site and all the lovely people here. Now 3 months on lost over 1 and a half stone, BG readings down to mainly 5s and 6s. Go onto the forum " What Have You Eaten Today " I tell everyone this as it is a forum were we all puy our daily meals on, look at what others eat and try and then test 2 hrs after. We are all a bit different in what foods we can tolerate, there are so many ideas that you will never get bored. I think the biggest part of finding we have diabetes is the food and what to eat. God luck . :):):):):):)
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  6. matildamay_

    matildamay_ Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    23

    Thank you so much.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  7. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,966
    Likes Received:
    33,693
    Trophy Points:
    298
    @matildamay_ -Hello again. Use your blood glucose meter and test 2 hours after eating a meal. It's a good idea to keep a food dairy - record what you have eaten, your blood sugar result before food and then 2 hours after. By doing this you can avoid foods that raise your blood sugars.
    Or, have you thought about following the LCHF Diet (Low Carb High Fat) a lot of forum members who are on this diet, loose weight and reduce their HBA1C - just click on this link and have a read.
    http://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/60-seconds
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  8. matildamay_

    matildamay_ Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    23

    Oh my goodness what an awful time you have had. Thank you for your reply, I shall certainly be doing lots of reading over the next few days. ☺️☺️
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    • Hug Hug x 1
  9. matildamay_

    matildamay_ Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    23
    I'm going to start testing, I asked the nurse about this and they wouldn't help, so I'm going to get a testing kit myself to do it.

    Thanks for your advice.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Friendly Friendly x 2
  10. Mike d

    Mike d Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    7,827
    Likes Received:
    11,206
    Trophy Points:
    198
    You have the best resources at your disposal. Use them :) Be it diet, weight or anything else, we are here :) As we say to all newbies, just ask. Nothing is off base
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 3
  11. Providence 62

    Providence 62 LADA · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    819
    Likes Received:
    5,190
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Great idea about getting yourself a testing kit. The NHS is rather stingy about kits and testing strips for Type 2s. I bought myself an SD Codefree meter on amazon over a year ago, it's still going strong and the strips are the cheapest. Pretty handy. My doctor wonders why I test so much (i.e. most mornings) but I find that it keeps me on the straight and narrow. If your blood glucose was at 19, no wonder you felt so bad.

    Read the great advice from others about diet, etc. This is a great site for learning.

    Best of luck


    Prov
     
    • Like Like x 7
  12. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,966
    Likes Received:
    33,693
    Trophy Points:
    298
    • Like Like x 2
    • Useful Useful x 1
  13. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    9,659
    Likes Received:
    15,719
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Welcome aboard @matildamay_ . It certainly seems like you have turned an important corner with your diabetes.

    When I was diagnosed, I decided to grab it by the throat right up front. you've had a little sabbatical, but you're here now. :)

    To be honest, beginning to test was the best thing I ever did, coupled with using the internet to learn about my condition. Beginning to test showed me, in my home, in front of my very own eyes what was going on in my blood. It really helped me, and my OH, accept my condition. Some person saying your reading is x,y or z is fine, but to take that reading ourselves, and know we did it correctly, for me was better. It also helped inform me, quick quickly what foods I was eating that weren't helping me at that time.

    Realising that, I turned to how to eat instead, and found various fora, including this one and my journey really took off.

    I decided to "eat to my meter". By that I mean, I spent a short while just getting on with my life, but testing and recording both the blood scores I got, and what I had eaten and drunk. That told me where the safer options were and where the no-nos lay. If the number on my meter was too high, I either had to give up that food, or try eating a smaller portion of it. Over time, I got the idea. Without trying, I also really trimmed up. That had never been a goal, but it was a welcome side-effect for me. I'm not very slim indeed.

    Your blood numbers will take a little while to come into shape, but with a following wind it is possible to make big improvements to your overall health.

    I've managed never to take any medication and have got my bloods back into a great shape, so now my challenge is to keep them there, but I'm determined to give this diabetes thing a run for it's money. Bolshy, moi? You bet. :)

    I think you'll be fine. I think you're ready for the challenge.
     
    • Like Like x 6
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. matildamay_

    matildamay_ Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    18
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Thank you for your response. I may have taken a while to get there, but I need to take this seriously now.

    I had previously asked about testing as I'd read about it however, the nurse just brushed my comments aside. I think part of my problem is that my GP and diabetic nurse didn't seem to take it seriously so I didn't. I have an appointment to discuss my blood results in 2 weeks and have decided that if it continues then I shall be asking for a referral to the specialist centre.

    Thanks again
     
    • Like Like x 4
  15. AndBreathe

    AndBreathe I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    9,659
    Likes Received:
    15,719
    Trophy Points:
    178
    At diagnosis, my nurse also said testing was unnecessary; I would get stressed, wouldn't understand what the results meant (Hello? Did she have any idea of my background at all?) and my fingers would hurt. My follow-up question was to ask her if she would taker her own advice, not to test, if she were diagnosed. The room went spookily quiet, which really told me what I needed to know.

    The NHS is so short of cash, it can't support everyone testing. It's just a shame we can't have grown up conversations about that, so that those who could find it useful are at least supported in their activity, if not their supplies.

    Few T2s, unless on hefty drug regimes have access to truly specialised support, but that doesn't mean you would necessarily be denied it. I'm just trying to manage your expectations a bit, or give you food for thought (pardon the pun) for preparing for your appointment.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  16. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

    Messages:
    10,966
    Likes Received:
    33,693
    Trophy Points:
    298
    @matildamay_ The most important and vital piece of equipment for a Diabetic is a blood glucose meter. :)
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook