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Type 2 Trying

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Bellatom, Jan 13, 2017.

  1. Bellatom

    Bellatom Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic, no meds just diet control however its easier said than done as I have no idea what my maximum daily carb intake should be my evening pre dinner glucose level today was 6.3 2 hrs post 8.4 is this really bad or am I on the right road.
    I am trying to reduce my weight at the same time as reducing carbs but the side effect of this seems to be my fsily fat increase has gone up.
    At the moment I am working to 1400 cals, 100g carbs per day not sure how I measure the fat other than % which is coming out as the highest % of my total daily food intake. Just worried I now swapping fat for carbs.
    Nightmare at the minute, any advice or guidance would be welcomed.
     
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  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Sounds like you are doing the right thing... well still too many carbs for me but.. the extra fat is what keeps you feeling full so less hunger pangs.. that's why it is called the low carb high fat diet. Just make sure you are eating good fat from meats fish olives avocado and not processed vegetable oil fat. Your glucose rise is ok but cold be better - 2 mmol/l is the max recommended rise I try for 1 or less but as you can see by my signature I'm a bit of an evangelist for this way of eating.
     
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  3. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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  4. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    I think olive oil virgin kind is a good fat source too and olives , as well as coconut oil and avocadoes and nuts
     
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  5. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Indeed..
     
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  6. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    and of course butter and bacon...
     
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  7. Maggie/Magpie

    Maggie/Magpie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum,
    I'm not the best at advising about carb portions, all I've done so far is halfed my carbohydrates, increased the use of butter and olive oil in my cooking and reduced portion sizes. Seems to be working so far. I've not gone by weight, there may come to a point I have to but I'm a visual person and been on many diets so rightly or wrongly there's plenty of guess work going on here. But I've lost nearly two stone, reduced my Hba1c from 53 to 40 and have BS between 5 and 7.5 mainly in three months. It's up to you and your BS how much you want/ need to be low carbing. If you have a metre test before each meal and two hours after to determine which foods you can tolerate and those that spike your blood sugars. Also before you go to bed and when you get up if you dont eat breakfast. Your definately on right road with your BS readings just a bit lower and you be in normal ranges (check out website here to confirm ranges).
    Good Luck
     
  8. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

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    AND.......
    Cream
    Coconut cream
    Chicken skin
    Cream cheese
    CHEESE
    I can't believe I have lost 50 pounds this way
     
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  9. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Expert

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    Yes butter makes your pants fall off
     
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  10. Maggie/Magpie

    Maggie/Magpie Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I will link @daisy1 in for you and she will give you some good advise everyone receives when starting out.
     
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  11. daisyduck

    daisyduck Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You're on the right track and ditto to all the good advice on here.
    It's difficult at first to relearn everything we have been told about fats.. Seriously, do not be afraid of them, and I wouldn't bother too much with calories either at first. Just get used to the new luxury of LCHF. You might surprise yourself by still losing weight.
    I have been a lifetime dieter, very strict, sticking to all the so called good advice. I ended up with metabolic syndrome. diabetes and non alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD
    3 years now on low carb but I had turned it around completely in six months. NAFLD gone (discharged from hospital clinic)
    2 stones gone.. and kept off for the first time ever.
    Hb levels now at 48 ( the lowest end of diabetic, and nearly into pre diabetes) A work in progress.
    Best of all I eat better now than I ever have, cooked breakfasts, plenty of cream and butter and I feel better than I've done in years.
    It's great that you have been given a meter, it's your new best friend.. apart from all the lovely people on here of course :) There is always someone ready to help with any questions you have so fire away x
     
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  12. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Legend

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    We all pick our own maximum carbs level. There is no right or wrong, but your meter will tell you if you have too many at one meal. Eat to your meter, set your own targets for post meal rises (but keep it under 2mmol/l mostly) Keep a food diary including portion sizes, record all your levels next to your food, and if you are unhappy with the rises, cut the portion sizes of your carbs and try again. You will eventually arrive at your personal carb level.

    As for fat, don't worry about it. It should be the greater part of your diet if you want low carb as it will keep hunger at bay and help smooth out those post meal spikes. I eat a lot of dairy, fry things in butter, add butter to my veggies, and smother it on my toasted Lidl rolls. Eggs are also very good for us, salmon (including tinned), other oily fish, cheese, cream, full fat yogurts, olive oil, avocado, nuts in moderation. Providing you drop the carbs enough the fats won't make you gain weight and you should lose. They will if your carb consumption is too high, in which case eat a bit less fat. Its a fine balance. Your scales and your meter will be the best tools alongside the food diary.
     
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  13. xyzzy

    xyzzy Other · Well-Known Member

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    I love it when people say that. Whoever invented that phrase (on this site at least) was an absolute bl**dy genius :)
     
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  14. Bellatom

    Bellatom Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hello everyone & thank you all for your advice which I will definately follow. I am so glad that everyone said good to have meter as I was told by GP practice not to bother but I bought one anyway as I couldnt see how I could check if I was on the right track.
    Will not get so stressed about fats as they are mainly good fats that I eat but I think I need to reduce my portion size as this is one of my problems.
    I would like to say that I use an app called my fitness pal which has been a lifeline for me I enter evrrything I eat and it gives me a complete breakdown of the food I just set the amount of cals, carbs etc and it does all the counting! Lets me know when I am getting close to my total so I would definstely say give it a go.
    Anyway thanks again and I am now off now to find and dust off my kitchen scales
     
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  15. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Strange as it might seem - if you reduce your carbs then calories start to go wonky - somehow they just don't matter as much as when you are eating carbs. As you will se from my signature I do Atkins. At the moment I am losing about 2 lb a week and I don't limit portions just the type of food I eat. Anything above 10 percent carbs is off limits I eat lots of meat with the natural fat - salads I add olive oil and vinegar dressing, full fat coleslaw or mayonnaise. I limit the weightloss to 2lb a week - that is limit, as I found that the weight just fell off me when I cut carbs too low. I'd look like last weeks party balloon by now if I'd cut down too much. After being unable to lose weight on any diet - ad the one for reducing cholesterol - I just put on weight as such a rate, and then became diabetic - or rather it was diagnosed, as I suspect I was undiagnosed for a very long time, only eating low carb kept it under control. If you can find a copy of Dr Atkins New diet revolution it has all sorts of information about the carb count and what to cut out and what to eat to start the process, though it might be available online if you search.
     
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  16. kittypoker

    kittypoker Friend · Well-Known Member

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    Dr Atkins was right. I don't think there's any other way to put it. If I'd been smart enough to ignore the dire warnings and stick with his plan at 21, I wouldn't now be borderline T2 and a helluva lot slimmer at 64. :banghead:

    I don't like the very American-based Atkins forum, which includes lots of advice to buy awful-sounding snacks, but paring it down to the basics, he was right. There's a calumny going around that he died of a heart attack after gaining a huge amount of weight, which isn't true. And even if it were, doesn't make all his research and advice invalid. He had viral cardiomyopathy, nothing to do with weight. Or a slip on the ice leading to a brain hemorrhage.
     
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  17. Bellatom

    Bellatom Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I am going to take your advice and reduce carbs to 75 a day
     
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  18. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    A bit of extra advice.. I found it much easier to just cut out as many carbs as I could and just have above ground veg, salad, cream as my carb sources and then just have cheese meat fish etc. By getting your carb way down you let your body recover. Then you can (if you really want to ) start introducing some carbs back and eat to your meter after that. I found that I didn't really miss the carbs so never re-introduced. I also skipped breakfast and just had a couple of mugs of tea..which I think also helped greatly but tht depends if you "have" to eat breakfast or not.
     
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  19. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend

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    @Bellatom

    Hello and welcome to the forum :) Here, as mentioned above, is the basic information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. It will give you lots of advice on carbs and a link to the Low Carb Program which you could join. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 220,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  20. Bellatom

    Bellatom Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Just found both your posts sorry you had to resend just trying to find my way around this website .
    Thank you for this info it has answered many of my questions.
     
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