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Unintentional weight loss T1 vs T2

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Andydragon, Apr 11, 2022.

  1. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    Hi all,

    I’m curious… unintentionally losing weight is a known side effect for diabetes. It’s indicated on the NHS and other sites as such and I personally suffered prior to diagnosis.

    But it’s often seen as more of a type 1 issue than type 2. I wondered if it is actually as rare in type 2 as it is thought or whether the fact I had it has biased my views somewhat
     
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  2. rosemaree

    rosemaree LADA · Well-Known Member

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    I always thought it was linked to type 1 and caused by a lack of insulin, like excess insulin and insulin resistance are known to cause weight gain and are linked to type 2. But then I lost and was diagnosed type 2, which made me wonder - although I always felt the doctors blew the weight loss off because I had it to lose. I was then later diagnosed with LADA after losing even more weight, which seemed to fit. It was kind of confusing, because I got my numbers right down and lost more weight intentionally, then I actually gained some before starting to lose again - I can only think my pancreas had a bit of a splutter and then dwindled again.

    It seems impossible to actually say, especially if you consider the number of people that get misdiagnosed.

    Have you ever had a c-peptide test to see how much insulin you still produce?
     
    #2 rosemaree, Apr 11, 2022 at 4:16 PM
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2022
  3. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    To confuse things even more, not all T1's/LADA's lose weight. I didn't, as far as I know, at least not enough to notice.
     
  4. In Response

    In Response Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My non-scientific understanding is that excess insulin causes weight gain. Due to insulin resistance, the pancreas of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to produce excess insulin.
    In contrast, someone with Type 1 is producing too little insulin so their body will break down fat and protein for energy resulting in weight loss. How much weight is lost is probably dependent upon how quickly our insulin producing cells are dying off. If they are dying off slowly, they may be producing enough insulin to get by ... for now.
    I lost a little weight but only notice it because, normally, my weight is incredibly stable.
     
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  5. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    That's what I thought. But apparently it happens in some T2's as well. Which makes sense if the insulin they have going around isn't helping the glucose in their blood being stored as fat.
    But I know very little about the technicalities so please don't take my post as the truth, just thinking out loud here!
     
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  6. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    It’s a known side effect for T2 as I said, but could be the reasons you are both saying that makes it more applicable to T1

    https://www.verywellhealth.com/rapid-weight-loss-5101064

    “Glucose is a sugar released into the bloodstream when you eat and drink. The pancreas makes insulin in response to the higher sugar levels in your blood. The body needs this hormone to release glucose to all its cells. With diabetes, the glucose builds up in your bloodstream. You may lose weight because the body needs an energy source and burns fat and muscle instead“

    when I was diagnosed my blood levels were extremely high, that suggests for me this was the impact. Makes me think though, excess insulin isn’t helping with the wxcess glucose, I think I understand very little on how it works!

    As I’m well over a decade and now in remission, it’s definitely T2 in my case

    seems like there may be sone form of tipping point then? Weight gain in general but at a certain point the levels in the blood are just too high. In t1 the lower levels of insulin mean it happens more often maybe?

    there are also drugs like the flozins that help weight loss by causing you to extrete glucose in urine.
     
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  7. catinahat

    catinahat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The extent of insulin resistance is different for all type 2's. If your resistance to your insulin is so severe that your body can't get enough energy from the glucose in your blood then it has no choice but to use its fat stores.
     
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  8. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    @Andydragon and @catinahat , your thinking sounds plausible to me.
    Which doesn't prove a thing of course, but it being some gradual thing makes sense.
     
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  9. Member496333

    Member496333 · Guest

    But it’s literally impossible to burn any meaningful amount of stored energy in the presence of excessive insulin. When type 2 begin to dramatically lose weight unintentionally it will almost certainly be because they have progressed to the stage where their pancreas has given up and taken its ball home.
     
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  10. Dr Snoddy

    Dr Snoddy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I can only quote my own experience here. One of the indications that something was wrong was rapid unintentional weight loss along with frequent urination, thirst, fatigue, acanthus nigrans in one armpit and some other indicators. I was diagnosed as Type 2 with an HbA1c of 108. Initially I was treated with Metformin and put myself on a low carbohydrate eating plan. I have been in remission for almost 8 years and am currently doing a
    50 miles walk along the Pembrokeshire Coastal Path. Not bad for a 67 year old who is now much fitter and healthier. So I don't really fit the metabolic theories.
     
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  11. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Moderator
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    That makes sense too, but @Andydragon says be lost weight at initial diagnosis and is now drug free. While I suppose he could have been unidagnosed for several years it seems unlikely that he would have reached the exhausted pancreas stage. Though my understanding is that insulin producing cells that have been damaged by hgh blood sugars can recover, at least to an extent.
     
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  12. Member496333

    Member496333 · Guest

    The pancreas doesn’t actually have to be broken. It can just be clogged up with fat. This is reversible.
     
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  13. Andydragon

    Andydragon Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    That’s interesting, it tallies with @Dr Snoddy as well as I suffered pretty much the same symptoms (except I don’t know what acanthus nigrans is) and drugs moderated the effects for a long time (hence not T1) and the weight loss I had reversed to the point of drug free and I have no doubt I lost a lot of internal fat along with it
     
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