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Veg Dodgers!!

Discussion in 'Low-carb Diet Forum' started by GeoffersTaylor, Mar 2, 2016.

  1. lizf4619

    lizf4619 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I have managed to get my grandsons to eat various veg by making what they call mixmash. Any veg mashed with sweet potato. They also eat sprouts shredded and mixed with cranberry and nuts, sauted in butter of course.
     
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  2. Rosbif

    Rosbif Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I love the "veg recipes of india" site. It's well worth a look if you don't know it. I've haven't been back though since the diabetes issue reared its ugly head but I will do soon. Need to test to see if I can tolerate the dahls...
     
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  3. Rosbif

    Rosbif Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    What about a stir-fry? All the veg is cut up into smallish pieces. I admit I've been doing mine with frozen veg (for convenience), which kinda ends up waterlogging the wok, but I will give fresh veg a try soon. Or steamed veg? I'm saying all this but I'm still a massive veg-dodger. Steamed some green beans and carrots the other day and in spite of the smallish portion I gave myself I still didn't finish it...
     
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  4. JenniferW

    JenniferW Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have a pressure cooker (am I old-fashioned?) and do my kale in that (super-steamed), and the result is super-tender (and tasty).
     
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  5. JenniferW

    JenniferW Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    A cheese sauce works miracles for pretty much any vegetables, but I'd been low carbing for almost a year before I realised you could make a 'sauce' with no flour! Now, I just put enough 100% milk in the pan to melt the grated cheese in, and it works well, and gives a sauce which gets itself around the veg more than if you just put grated cheese on top (and under the grill).
     
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  6. Rosbif

    Rosbif Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I have a pressure cooker too - I love it, it's great for stews that would otherwise take 3 hours!
     
  7. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Great suggestion, once you stir-fry veg and add seasoning it tastes so much different, Ken Hom says you only need one pan in a house and that is a Wok :)
     
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  8. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    While I like most veg, I just CANNOT get past the ones that taste of aniseed (fennel and celeriac type of things)

    However, there are a few that are unexpectedly and interestingly delish:
    - aubergine and courgette in moussaka (the D version of lasagna)
    - saag paneer (spinach and cheese curry. divine.
    - creamy parmesan cabbage
    - peppers stuffed with cream cheese or pate, and baked
    - cabbage, peas and mince
    - baked, curried onion rings (slice the onions, drizzle with oil and massage with curry paste. bake on a baking sheet on low heat til crispy)
    - kale crisps as described above
    - pumpkin pancakes
     
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  9. Rosbif

    Rosbif Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks!
    And it's given me an idea for what to make for this evening's meal.
    I'm gonna put carrots, broccoli (scary), red pepper, bamboo shoots (tinned), mini sweetcorn (jarred, in vinegar), and a handful of (frozen) snow peas in it, as well as thin slices of beef which I need to marinate in something, I don't know yet! Hopefully the carrots and sweetcorn won't cause too much of a spike...
     
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  10. BooJewels

    BooJewels Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I use creme fraiche with a nip of mustard and other seasonings, along with the grated cheese, makes a slightly thicker sauce.

    One of our favourite weekend lunches is to take lightly cooked asparagus and spiral wrap long thin strips of a smoked meat like serrano ham or prosciutto round the spears, place in an ovenproof dish and add black pepper and then grated cheese or mozarella over the top and pop under the grill. I think it's a variation of a Hairy Dieters recipe.
     
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  11. Kyi

    Kyi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You can "hide" veg in things like sheppards pie mince peas carrots, cautiflower mash (add mustard cheese and cream to the mash if you like it cheesy)
     
  12. JenniferW

    JenniferW Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Why not cook larger batches when you have time and freeze them? I've started to do that more, so there's no excuse!
     
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  13. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Sounds good, I'm a garlic lover so would have to throw a bulb or two in :)
     
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  14. Kyi

    Kyi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  15. Larissima

    Larissima Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    How do you make pumpkin pancakes? The recipes I've found on Pinterest all seem to use tinned pumpkin puree, and I haven't been able to find that here...
     
  16. BooJewels

    BooJewels Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I hope you're single, if you add more than a bulb of garlic to a stir fry! :hungover::eek:

    I really hope that you meant a 'clove' or two.
     
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  17. Kyi

    Kyi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Pumpkin puree is easy. Roast your squash (any but pumpkin will be a little sweeter add a tiny bit of sweetner if you think it needs it) then mash it with a fork. Ive had both fresh and tinned and much prefer fresh just a little bit more time consuming. If the recipe doesnt have pumpkin spices (I think they are just nutmeg,cinnemon and cloves, allspice and ginger ) then add spices. Its probably the wrong time of year as pumpkins seem to come October then disappear. Butternut squash will work instead.

    Recipe using coconut flour http://dessertswithbenefits.com/healthy-pumpkin-pancakes/
    Recipe using almond meal http://www.ruled.me/low-carb-pumpkin-pancakes/

    Coconut flour is extremely absorbent which is why only 2 tblsps compared to almond meal of 1 cup. They will turn out more like an american pancake (scotch) than a crepe.
     
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    #37 Kyi, Mar 4, 2016 at 2:39 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 4, 2016
  18. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    :)
    I use this recipe
    http://www.ruled.me/low-carb-pumpkin-pancakes/
    And tinned pumpkin puree - from Tescos. I read somewhere that it may actually be butternut squash, but i can't remember where i saw that. :)
    I think it is seasonal, and hard to come by atm, so i buy several tins when i see them, and they last til i next spot them in stock.
     
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  19. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Seriously...............a clove or two :eek:

    No I meant bulbs, garlic is extremely good for you and is good at keeping bp and cholesterol levels in check, it adds a delicious flavour to meals and we (that is my wife and I) add it to many of our dishes.

    Talking of which, Lidl do a Chinese garlic that is so convenient to use, it just looks like a normal garlic bulb but when you peel the skin off it's just like a onion and doesn't have the individual cloves, it must be out of season at the moment as they are not stocking it but it should be back in the shops soon, try it @BooJewels
     
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  20. BooJewels

    BooJewels Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ah well, at least if both of you eat it, you can suffer together. I like garlic and use it in most dishes, but I can't imagine ever using a whole bulb - I do occasionally roast whole ones with pieces of meat as they're very mild when done that way - but stir fries are so quickly done, the garlic remains fairly robust.

    Thanks for the tip on the Lidl one, I can't say I've spotted that - I shall look out for it. We did get some Chinese ones from a local farm shop that were very mild and sweet and nutty and you could use a lot more of those and fairly raw, but they haven't had them for a while.
     
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