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Reactive Hypoglycemia Was it nocturnal hypoglycemia?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by ksdks95, Aug 17, 2019.

  1. ksdks95

    ksdks95 Reactive hypoglycemia · Newbie

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    Good morning!

    I have a question, again about nocturnal hypoglycemia.

    Yesterday evening I had a relatively light dinner (21:00). Just before bed (00:20) I measured my blood glucose, 93 mg / dL. Around 4:20 in the morning I woke up and measured glucose again, 108 mg / dL.

    Could the increase in blood sugar be caused by hypoglycemia?

    Thank you for the answers and best regards!
     
  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Simply put no.
    Hypoglycemia is low blood sugar so an increase in blood glucose levels is in no way hypoglycemia.
     
  3. ksdks95

    ksdks95 Reactive hypoglycemia · Newbie

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    Whether such a thing (increase in sugar level after its decrease) is not called Somogyi rebound?
     
  4. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    You mean a kind of dawn phenomenon?
     
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  5. ksdks95

    ksdks95 Reactive hypoglycemia · Newbie

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    Nope, i mean Somogyi effect / posthypoglycemic hyperglycemia.
    But thank you for realizing that there is such a thing as "dawn phenomenon". I am completely new to this subject :).
     
  6. MeiChanski

    MeiChanski Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello, have you been testing for a certain period of time to record the hypos? From what I understand a somogyi phenomenon happens when you go through a long period of untreated hypos and it rebounds to a high blood sugar. A defensive response from the body. However 92 mg isn't a hypo though, it converts to 5.1 mmol, which is quite a nice blood level to be at and 108 is 6.0.
     
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  7. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi,

    Personally, those are nice figures to bed down & wake up from.. But does not indicate a nocturnal hypo, unless you tracked your BG during sleep?
    Did you manage to test again a little later after your morning routine before breakfast?
    The liver can dump after waking. Especially in my case during prep for work..

    I'm speaking from observations as an insulin dependant.
    I'll tag in some RH guys who may help with your question. @Brunneria @Lamont D
     
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  8. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    Hi and welcome!

    I have RH, and my blood glucose is now controlled by a very low carb way of eating, so my bg and food are nicely under control (unless I do something silly, like eating carbs ;) ).

    But whenever I use a Freestyle Libre sensor I am v curious about the blood glucose shenanigans that happen overnight - usually without any hypos, but sometimes with them.

    I think it is easy to think that bg just grooves along overnight in a straight line from the time we close our eyes to when we open them again, but that certainly isn’t what my body does.

    Give me 5 mins and I will switch to my phone where i have some Libre screen shots to illustrate.

    Here you go:

    First pic is today. Lie in, protein/fat breakfast. No carb
    E8131495-093B-4469-B074-CC5914015B40.jpeg

    And the second pic is what happened overnight a few nights ago

    E3C0F082-5AB9-40DB-BD14-0B1E9CF5C500.jpeg

    See all the ups and downs between midnight and 8am? No idea what caused it. I am recovering from a virus and it was a poor night’s sleep, but which came first? The hypo? The bad dreams? Or the virus?

    At 8am I ate a protein/fat snack and my bg immediately began to even out and then drifted downwards for the rest of the day.

    I can throw out jangly overnight bgs like that without a virus in the mix - and often do. But bad dreams and hypos at 2.30-3.00am go hand in hand for me. Followed by a rebound. And good steady bgs during the day do not prevent them from dancing a tango at night while I am stacking zzzzs.

    So yes, if you have something similar going on, then it is quite possible that you had a dip and a rebound.
    Or you could have just gently drifted up a little.
    Impossible to do more than speculate, unless you have something like the Libre.

    Hope that helps.

    Oh, and did you spot that my bg was rising again approaching midnight that evening? Nothing to do with food. That day I ate at 7pm and was asleep before the bg rise kicked off.
     
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    #8 Brunneria, Aug 17, 2019 at 2:38 PM
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2019
  9. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    If I remember correctly the phrase somogyi effect is typical Reactive Hypoglycaemia rebound from hyper then hypo then hyper, hypo, hyper, the roller coaster ride of blood sugar rising very quickly, then as the overshoot of excessive insulin drives levels down into hypoglycaemia.
    Because of this rebound, the symptoms are heightened and I believe so bad for your health. As I have discovered, keeping your blood sugar levels in tight control is the best treatment for RH.
    The longer you have control, the less episodes you will have.
    Because RH is food derived. Having the right dietary balance is so important.
     
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