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Wear a bracelet that says you have diabetes!

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by TheBigNewt, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @catapillar . A good , to the point tattoo. Like it.
    Always feel we got a bit short changed with the official " blue circle " logo.
     
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  2. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    When I did my first aid training (a long time ago) we were told to check for medical bracelets and neckless. I don't think rolling up a coat sleeve (for example) to check for a tattoo is something most first aiders will automatically do. (Clearly, a nurse would see it when checking for a pulse.)
     
  3. willmax

    willmax Type 1 · Member

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    I think the advice to wear a bracelet with a medical warning is probably the best bit of advice that a diabetic can be given and act upon. My bracelet has probably saved my life about ten times over the last 68 years that I have treated my type 1 diabetes. I originally had a metal/chrome Medic Alert bracelet in the 1970s. However, I found that with wear and tear the clasp frequently failed after wearing the bracelet for a year or so. I currently wear a Medical Alert rubber bracelet which has my name and sentence about my clinical condition printed on a white area upon the bracelet. I very strongly recommend that all diabetics should wear such a bracelet because it saves a great deal of time for an examining physician when one is admitted to A&E or even when first approached by a paramedic.
     
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  4. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Assuming the patient is wearing long sleeves.
    It's not just hypos. I've been at RTA's where jewellery that patient was wearing is no where to be found along with shoes. You'd be amazed what things become dislodged in traumatic circumstances.
    We can't cover every eventuality.
    On a quite recent first aid training course the first aider found my tattoo without any prompting. Perhaps times have changed.
     
  5. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    An older gentleman sat beside me in the plane on my commute back home the other day. He just had a medical alert wrist band. He put this little case in the seat back pocket and I immediately suspected he was diabetic. He had a travelling companion beside him. He was trying to hide a B-D Microfine pen cap in his hand that I couldn't help but see as his hand was almost in my face with him twisting about. I was going to say something to him, but he was making such an effort to be discreet, I just looked out the window and let him go. I guess it takes one to know one, but I assume most medical alerts are allergy or D.
     
  6. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    That’s really nicely done, thanks for sharing. What does the second line mean?
     
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  7. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's: I (I) am greater than (>) the highs (/\) & (&) lows (\/). Just trying to make myself believe I'm more than just a number! :)
     
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  8. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    That’s fabulous! It is so hard not to feel defined by just a series of numbers and a knackered pancreas...

    I had a good look at the commercially available bracelets and don’t like ANY of them. I’m currently chatting to a friend of mine who is a leather worker to see if we can create something unusual but still effective with a silver plaque on (I’m a silversmith) that I won’t mind wearing. I used to wear a standard medic alert bracelet but I loathed the thing. But this thread has reminded me of the importance of being labelled again! I do have a set of dog tags with all my ailments on, but I find them annoying. If I didn’t already have a nice watch I’d look into getting a watch face made with all the info on :)
     
  9. NoKindOfSusie

    NoKindOfSusie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I know that this is going to make me unpopular yet again, but this is just awful.

    Tattoos? People want to permanently mark themselves with THIS? Of all things?
     
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  10. LooperCat

    LooperCat Type 1 · Expert

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    I’m not sure I’d choose a diabetes tattoo having _really_ thought about it. All mine are to celebrate things I love. I have to think about diabetes enough of the time as it is - but I do totally get why people choose to have them. I’m always interested to see people’s ink, and love to hear the stories behind it. We all choose to deal with this bloody affliction in different ways. I’ve tried ignoring it, and nearly died twice. That didn’t work, obviously. I’m trying hard to take control now, been T1 for 20 years. The Libre has been a real turning point for me, even two DKAs weren’t enough to jolt me into action.
     
  11. kev-w

    kev-w Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I've got much much worse ones :)

    I think I'm going to get one done at some point around my wrist pulse point, as I never fancied the bracelet so carry a card, the card's saved me a couple of times in the distant past so aren't a bad idea to carry.
     
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  12. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    She is old enough to know better, or at least enough life experience to listen, process the information and then adjust. A teenager you could understand, although that still does not make it right.
     
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  13. ashthetash

    ashthetash · Member

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    In >10 years frontline ambulance service not sure I have ever looked for a medical alert bracelet, particularly early in my assessment. In medical situations there is usually someone present that can give me info about diabetic status. In trauma situations diabetes assumes lesser importance. In either case a capillary glucose test is going to part of the assessment and excessively high/low readings investigated/treated as necessary.
     
  14. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    But a police officer will take note if they see a bracelet saying someone has diabetes other then just assuming it due to they being out drinking....
     
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  15. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    With that sort of thinking going on, if you get fed up with your current job, you've got a good career ahead of you as either a cryptic crossword setter, or working for MI5!
     
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  16. Jaylee

    Jaylee Type 1 · Moderator
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    The first thing a police officer will do is lean in close enough to smell your breath to ascertain sobriety...
    Lol, I've been stopped enough late at night driving home from gigs. (Christmas DD campaign.) Then allowed on my way...
    Though, an officer's own safety comes first if the "suspect" appears agressive.?
    The "details" may not be noticed until after the event...
    I seriously don't feel a copper will have the time to read an inscription cuffing someone during a scuffle.

    Somebody unconscious, or semiconscious.? Fair enough...
     
  17. tinyfilosofer

    tinyfilosofer Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have a continuous glucose monitor (cgm) which allows me to turn my brain into an artificial pancreas. It’s not unaffordable. Company says 50$ for 6 days but usually i stretch it to 12-15 days. Once for 23 days. It’s the Guardian connect. Do read up on it. It has changed my life completely.
    Think of it as the price of a beer or a jewellery, but it can help avoid complications.
    It allows me to see exactly what is happening inside and to correct my insulin food and exercise regime immediately. I hardly go Low and my alert Dog has become a pet Dog now.
     
  18. tinyfilosofer

    tinyfilosofer Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  19. isjoberg

    isjoberg Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If people want cheapish and subtle diabetes bracelets, the Finnish diabetic association does these two (https://www.diabetes.fi/d-kauppa/tu...ke_(musta)_hopealaatta_22_cm_(dd).18374.shtml
    https://www.diabetes.fi/d-kauppa/tu..._(musta)_pronssilaatta_22_cm_(dd).18374.shtml )

    You can get the website in English and I have always been complimented on my nice bracelet which gives me a good chance to explain that I'm diabetic etc. However, there is no real option for engraving/adding information so not ideal if that is something you are looking for :)
     
  20. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    They really work, @Scott-C and @therower ! I've worn them during shopping today, and everyone saw right away that something's not quite right with me!
     
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