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"What have you eaten" Parallel Chat

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by zauberflote, Nov 9, 2020.

  1. Annb

    Annb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've tried dosing at various times before food but for me, it doesn't make a difference. I'm not sure whether these fellows were talking about all kinds of diabetes or just T1 or just T2, or whatever. Don't know if that might make a difference to the efficacy of the suggestion.

    Metabolic disorder has often been mentioned in my case but never actually confirmed but I'm not clear about what this means. Questions in my mind are: Is T2 a metabolic disorder in itself? In which case why is there a question in the medics' minds? Is it only a possibility? In which case, should there be some kind of test to find out? Is there anything that can be done about it?

    I've been trying to look for information on this on the internet but between all the various sites, I'm more confused than I was already. So - T2 - resisting insulin, both naturally produced and injected; apparently I am producing insulin so my pancreas must be working after a fashion at least. Even lots of injected insulin has a limited effect. The only thing that really has an effect is to eat nothing at all. Having a small effect is to reduce carbs to almost zero. Maintaining a BG level around 10 or so requires reducing carbs to 20 or 30 grams.

    As I'm sure everyone on this forum knows - it's not a whole lot of fun.

    Just having an early morning moan - BG is currently 12.3 on a cup of tea and an hour after taking my basal dose. At the moment I'm hungry and it's cold in the house - outside temperature is only 7 degrees at present and I won't put the heating on - and I'm sitting here in 2 big thick jumpers and a blanket around me but I should really be wearing gloves to get my hands to warm up. I'll cheer up later, when I've eaten something.
     
  2. Annb

    Annb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone have experience of the effects of Sorbitol on BG? Neil was wondering if it is something I could use (he has a huge packet of it for his own use, which might go off before he can get through it), From what I can see there are as many carbs in Sorbitol as in sugar, but some people think it has half the effect of sugar on BG since it is slower to metabolise. I suspect it would be a bad idea to use it, but I wonder if any of you guys have tried it.
     
  3. Annb

    Annb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I consulted the pharmacist at our medical practice about taking pain killers. I'm not addicted to the codeine in the Co-codamol that I take, but I am finding that it has less effect than it used to, so I am taking 2 doses on some days. And now, even that isn't taking the edge off the soreness, although it does, after about an hour, ease the restless legs. So I was looking for something to replace it with. However, she thinks I'm better sticking with it but separating out the codeine from the paracemol. So she is changing my prescription to separate them out and I can decide how much of the codeine to take with regular doses of paracetemol.

    I also asked her about the Furosimide, which apparently was given to treat breathlessness,years ago and never stopped. The breathlessness is still there, although since having my iron infusion it is much improved. So she is cancelling that and adding in a new one which should help with the fluid retention but may put my blood pressure up, so will have to watch that.

    Mainland dermatologist, consulted online, says the problem with my legs is a bacterial infection on top of the eczema which has been there for years but at the back of it is "venous insufficiency" (varicose veins) for which he recommends consultation with a specialist surgeon. Could do without more surgery. He says I have classic "inverted champagne bottle" legs!:rolleyes:
     
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  4. Annb

    Annb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well, best laid plans and all that. I took my insulin at noon, expecting to eat at 12.30 to give the insulin half an hour to work on my BG. I had just put my breakfast on a plate, got a fork out of the drawer and Alistair arrived with the post and started chatting. I didn't want to chase him because he won't be back for a few days, so I chatted and didn't notice the time. He left at 1 pm. By that time my breakfast was coldish and my insulin had been operating for an hour. BG was down to 6.1, which is absolutely fine, but it's still dropping after my meal. I'll have to wait and see how far it goes (5.1 just now) and be ready to take action if it goes too far.
     
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  5. Zhnyaka

    Zhnyaka Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    What insulin do you use? I always thought that I should get an injection 15 minutes before eating, but one day I got an injection and began to wash the dishes, and then the stove instead of eating. When half an hour had passed, I was surprised to notice that I did not have hypoglycemia
     
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  6. Annb

    Annb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have been on various insulins to try to get some kind of control over my BG. At present I am on Tresiba as a basal dose and Humalog as a bolus dose. I was advised to take the bolus dose 10 minutes before eating and did that for a long time, although sometimes I forgot and took it only 2 or 3 minutes before eating. Sometimes I use the Humalog as a correction dose when BG goes too high. It's not really good for that but at least it doesn't force BG down to dangerous levels very quickly. It would, possibly, if I didn't watch out for that.

    I thought that perhaps the 10 minutes was wrong so decided to try different times; 5 minutes, 15 minutes, 20 minutes. Didn't seem to make any difference to high BG's. When I saw the video that Antje posted last week, I thought I'd try again and extended to 30 minutes before eating. That seemed to work better and BG didn't rise too far.

    Then things started to go wrong because I was delayed getting my meals having already taken my Humalog. It was OK at 35 minutes but then I accidentally left it for an hour. BG started to drop, but actually corrected itself, stopping at what for me was low, but within range. This morning I've got it wrong again. I took my Humalog at what should have been half an hour before breakfast, but then took an antibiotic pill, felt really ill as a result and couldn't eat at all. I sat in my chair, waiting to feel able to eat, but fell asleep and woke up 11/2 hours later. BG was 4.1 and I quickly grabbed a slice of bread to try to stop the drop. It carried on dropping to 3.4 but stopped at that and came back up to 7.8. It is now fairly stable at 5.9.

    My normal BG is in the 10 to 12 range and that's why I started experimenting and that's probably why BG doesn't actually (usually) drop to hypo levels, although it has taken me by surprise in the past. I still don't understand why my BG is usually so high or why the dime of injecting insulin should make a difference but, for me, it does. I don't suppose anyone else is the same as me - I'm just an odd-bod in many ways.
     
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  7. Annb

    Annb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Em's Mum and Dad arrived to take her home and brought 2 of the pups to show me. They are so cute! They've all doubled their birth size and are around the 3 lb mark now although one of the ones that came today weighs over 4 lb and is a fat little thing. Apparently he just climbs into their feeding bowl and makes sure he gets all that is going and makes sure that he barges all the others out of the way to get to the "milk bar". He is a selfish little blighter, but he is so cute. They are thinking of calling him 'dozer (although today he was more dozy).
     
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  8. Riva_Roxaban

    Riva_Roxaban Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Blue Care nurse have just to dress the wound in my leg, she had alsom brought along a student nurse from the TAFE College who is doing some outside training with them instead of the base hospital.

    He is more aware as a second year student on what to do than a third year student from CQU doing the same thing at the base when I was a inpatient there.

    Meredith the BC nurse said she has 150 mls of rain at here place this month and is worrying about crocodiles coming into her back yard.

    I mentioned about Drop Bears being worse to the student nurse, he told me had heard about them, but he had his grandfathers kukri under his shirt and will dispatch them in good Gurkha fashion.

    Turns out his family left Nepal twenty five years ago and migrated to Australia.
     
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  9. Riva_Roxaban

    Riva_Roxaban Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Just got a box of free rats delivered with my scripts from the pharmacy.

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Annb

    Annb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Maybe you should carry some sort of weapon to defend yourself with against the drop bears; maybe a lightsabre would be useful. Or maybe that medical student could lend you his Dad's kukri.
     
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  11. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    This might fascinate you!

    upload_2022-5-17_21-1-33.jpeg
     
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  12. Zhnyaka

    Zhnyaka Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, it is fascinate me :happy:
    Of all that is in this photo, I know only syringes. Frankly, I am surprised by the length of the needle. (I use a needle 6 millimeters long) It seems to me that only intramuscular injections can be done with such a needle
     
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  13. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    I took it to this chatty thread in the General chat section of the forum because I didn't want to derail or scare the person who posted the other thread. :)

    I've only used pens as well, but with the old syringes you pinch some skin and inject at an angle to inject subcutaneously.
    I've done it wit a guinea pig needing medication, and with a goat too. The goat needed both a intramuscular injection and a subcutaneous one, I was instructed to use the same needle for both.
    For the one in the muscle I just rammed it in the goat's neck muscle, for the subcutaneous one I pinched and injected at an angle.

    Told the vet injecting the goat myself wouldn't be a problem at all, but that was before I saw the needle! :eek:
    Still, I managed! :)
    A goat's skin isn't much thicker than a human's, so if you can inject under the skin with this you definitely can with the ones in @Grant_Vicat 's picture!

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    We have definitely moved on! The best item is top right, a Swiss black plastic carrying case which had compartments for two plastic syringes, 2 insulin bottles and alcohol wipes with a water proof pill box in the bottom compartment. They were completely shockproof, but for some reason rarely advertised. The aluminium and blue plastic tubes were filled with methylated spirit to keep the glass syringes sterilised. they were sprung loaded and had a screw top.
     
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  15. Grant_Vicat

    Grant_Vicat Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Real horror movie stuff!
     
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  16. Riva_Roxaban

    Riva_Roxaban Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Australian Australian's are immune to Drop Bears because we have been eating Vegimite, foreign born tourists and Australian are not immune.

    There is a big jar of Vegimite at most tourist traps so you can dab a little bit on behind the ears.

    Grndfathers kukri.
     
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  17. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    What about moving your history posts from the other thread to here as well? The thread was started by a newly diagnosed T2 who mentions panic attacks because of their diagnosis. Perhaps not the best place to discuss scary historical treatment of T1?
     
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  18. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Moderator
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    I heard that the Vegimite needed to be applied to the armpits, and another method of defence is to wear sharp pins, or forks, pointing upwards in the hair to spike the dropbears if they leap on you?
     
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  19. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    I'm having a hard time applying your advice.
    Can you please post a picture showing exactly how it should be done?
     
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  20. Pipp

    Pipp Type 2 · Moderator
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    • Funny Funny x 2
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