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What should a blood sugar be after candy?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by Stefmjxo, Dec 29, 2019.

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  1. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    I got a 189 sugar after ten gummys and a cookie 2 hours after eating. After regular meals I'm fine, and after fasting I'm fine. Is there any research on sweets and if it's normal to get that high?
     
  2. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    You've provided no info on yourself or if you are diabetic or not or type. It would help if you fill out some of your profile so people can have an idea to provide more relevant advice or comments.

    No idea what your reading was before eating junk?

    Some people will go much higher, some less so and some won't know how high they really went if they didn't test beyond the 2hr mark. You've kind of just done your own research on what sugary junk does to you and that's what's important, what it does to you and not someone else if you get my meaning.

    A solution would be to not to eat stuff that does that to your levels.

    And welcome to the forum.
     
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  3. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    That would probably help lol, I'm sorry. I'm 28 former gestational diabetic concerned about certain numbers. Fasting numbers all perfect 84-90, two hours after a can of coke 113, but I could not believe the number after the candy I had that was 189 two hours later. How can I have a diabetic number with normal numbers everywhere else? The only other time I had a bad reading was after a cookie I shot up to 160 at one hour, down to 140 at two hours. I've been checking because it's been five years since my first gd diagnosis and I wanted to make sure my sugars were under control. Even after having a slice of cake I was at 103 two hours later. I'm just confused and.nervous now that my sugar got so elevated and was more than likely over 200 at peak. Can a prediabetic or non diabetic have a spike over 200 at peak?
     
  4. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    No worries, the high readings after candy and a cookie are to be expected. That's what sugar will do to you. That's why you got high readings. People who are not diabetic can spike high like this if eating a lot of carbs in a meal.

    If you want to keep them under control, stay away from coke or get the sugar free version. Start reading labels and look at the total carb count on foods per serving. Some things can look ok, but people don't take into account what a serving size actually is and can be far smaller then what they'd dish out for themselves. Ice cream is a great example, a serving size is actually really small. Same goes with cereals. Candy is just nothing but sugar.

    There is a link under my post high lighted in red, "nutritional thingy" which is written by one of our members here. It's very good info wise for those looking to reduce carb intake and maintain good health. A good eating guide I think, worth checking out if interested.
     
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  5. Antje77

    Antje77 LADA · Moderator
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    Did you wash hands and retest?
     
  6. Cocosilk

    Cocosilk Gestational · Well-Known Member

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    Can I tell you something straight? I'm in a similar situation to you. I had gestational diabetes with my 3rd child and he's almost 8 months old now. I still don't know for sure or not if I am prediabetic but after watching this video, I realise that you don't want to wait till your blood sugar is in the diabetic range because that's way late in the game.

    If you had gestational diabetes, you ARE insulin resistant, and that's already on the way to diabetes. If you've been eating carbs for the last 5 years, you are even closer to diabetes now.

    In the video, Dr Paul Mason shows the GTT lab results of 3 individuals. The healthy individual had these results:
    Fasting 5.1 mmol (90) (even lower would be better) / 1h: 5.6 mmol (100) / 2h; 4.4 mmol (80).

    I also keep reading that a healthy blood sugar range sits between 4 and 6 mmol (72 - 106) at all times. If you are spiking higher than that, you have a problem.

    Your insulin levels are what's important because they go up long before your blood sugar. If your blood sugar is already spiking, you've gone on too long with the sweets (and carbs in general). Pull back now! Accept your fate. Don't keep going till you get full blown diabetes. The sweets and softdrink are not worth it. At least I don't think they are. You can make lower carb sweets to get yourself off them and eventually try to find something else to do. I know it's hard. I still have a sweet tooth but stop at one or two squares of 85% dark chocolate, or make my own cocoa, carob powder and coconut oil sweet thing if I am really missing something sweet with my coffee or tea. I'm not over it yet and it's been close to a year.. Chewing gum helps.

    Anyway, watch this. It helped me wake up. Hopefully it helps you too.
     
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    #6 Cocosilk, Dec 29, 2019 at 12:59 PM
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2019
  7. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    Thank you! You're right, I don't want to end up worse off later. I am hoping to make changes now
     
  8. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    I did, second test at 180
     
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  9. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    Thank you!
     
  10. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    The more you watch Ivor Cummins videos it becomes clearer to me that the "sugar" thing is just not worth it. Ivor (or a guest on at least one of his latest podcasts) show examples of persons with good fasting blood glucose in the normal range, HbA1c's of around 5.1 / 5.2, but post prandial spikes in the diabetic range along with high I insulin levels (and sometimes poor HDL and Trigs). It would potentially pay to be mindful of sweeties in my view.
     
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  11. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    I agree with Cocosilk. I wish I had known way back what I know now. If I had- maybe I could have reduced carbs a whole lot earlier and ended up in a position where I never had the amount of insulin resistance I have now. I would also have been able to lose weight a whole lot easier than the multiple diets I have tried.

    Reducing carbs now may have the effect of being able to eat a less reduced level of carbs for a long time- in my view that would be great.

    My opinion- not an expert is that some people are just more intolerant to carbs than others- the earlier they realise and lower their carbs the less damage they will do to their bodies.

    Good luck.
     
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  12. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    Thank you, my concern is that with numbers typically in range that having a spike in the 180's two hours after having the candy might mean I'm already a full diabetic. I know it seems silly from one number, and that all of my fastings are normal, but that's a number I would expect in someone with type 2. It's very scary
     
  13. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    189 equals 10.49 mmol/L according to the conversion calculator in my diabetes app, I would be seriously thinking of stopping eating sugary lollies / sweeties / candy if that's the sort of readings you get after eating them.
     
  14. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    Yes I am not eating them again, but in the absence of other bad numbers, does a reading like that make someone a diabetic? I only ask because it was surely over 200 at peak. I don't have my appointment until after the new year that's why I'm asking here. My fastings are all 84-90 and my typical pp meal is 100-120 after two hours of a balanced meal with some carbs.
     
  15. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    Could a number that high still just indicate prediabetic or does spiking over 200 automatically mean full on diabetes is what I mean
     
  16. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Stefmjxo- I don't know the answer to your specific question as I don't know how high a non-diabetic would get. However, If I were getting those readings I would not eat any more of that type of thing until I get a HbA1c. For me the risk is high vs a short period of time on lower carbs which is not too bad. Of course when you get your HbA1c you will need to take into account the fact that you have been low carb for a while so if your result is anywhere near the top of the normal range I would continue low carb. There is no harm in being low carb but plenty of potential risk of having high blood sugar levels.
     
  17. Stefmjxo

    Stefmjxo · Member

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    I'm
    Thank you!
     
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