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Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by StephLightfoot, Jan 19, 2018.

  1. StephLightfoot

    StephLightfoot Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi everyone am a newly diagnosed T2 diet controlled. I have many other health issues to do with my heart, and have thought till now that whats been causing my funny turns.
    I had a very late breakfast today and at lunch time wasn't hungry, i decided to pop to asda before having my dinner. While i was shopping i went really hot sweat was teaming out of me then my hands were shaking then just before i left my vision went blurred. Could this be a hypo? i did have a bottle of water and a chicken butty before going home which seemed to help.
     
  2. phdiabetic

    phdiabetic Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If you are newly diagnosed, your body is probably still adjusting to normal blood sugar levels. Before you were diagnosed you had very high blood sugars, so now normal numbers feel too low to your body. This will improve over time as your body adjusts to having better blood sugars. Since you are diet controlled, you are not in danger of a severe hypo - you are not taking any blood glucose lowering medication, and if you did get low your body would be able to recover on its own.
     
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  3. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Hello and welcome to the forum. Just to be clear, are you on any medication at all for Type 2 Diabetes? And if you wouldn't mind telling us what your most recent HbA1c results are and whether you use a glucometer to test your blood glucose at home then that they help members to better advise you.
    I notice that you say you are diet controlled T2 but that you had a 'chicken butty'. As bread is a high carb food could you describe a typical day's meals for us, please?

    I shall tag @daisy1 for her helpful welcome pack offered to all those who are newly diagnosed.
    As to your funny turn, it may have been a 'false hypo' but until you can tell us a little more then it would be unwise to make a guess especially as you have other health problems. Have a wander around the forum, there are very many knowledgeable members who are always ready to help.
     
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  4. StephLightfoot

    StephLightfoot Type 2 · Newbie

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    My GP says i don't need to monitor my blood sugars so no i don't have a monitor. My last HbA1c test was 49.
    Up untill now daily food intake Sausage and egg in the morning lunch a butty and crisps if hungry then dinner stew and dumplings. But since Tuesday i have changed to wholemeal bread and have cut down my carb in take by having less spuds and tons of veg. And i now have weetabix in the morning. I feel such a fool not know this stuff.What is a false hypo? thanks for replying.
     
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  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @StephLightfoot

    Hello Steph and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 235,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.

    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why

    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  6. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I heard a new take on this the other day. Doctor told patient he didn't need to test because it's just a snapshot. I told him and the HbA1c is the average of all the snapshots.

    Many of us find that buying a meter, testing before meals and again two hours afterwards tells us which foods cause the worst blood sugar spikes. You need to know what is happening with your diabetes in order to try to control it.
     
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  7. Tophat1900

    Tophat1900 Type 3c · Well-Known Member

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    You're not a fool. You're just starting out. You do need to check your blood sugar, I don't know where doctors get the idea you don't from, but it is wrong. The last thing you want is to sit down to a meal not knowing you already have a high blood glucose level or if you are close to a hypo. You just cannot know what they are without testing.

    Many people with T2 eat to their meter, I did when I did strictly diet controlled. Figuring out what amount of carbs works for you is an individual thing. More then likely Weetbix will probably send your levels through the roof.

    False hypos are when you experience hypo like symptons, but you are not actually having a hypo. This is a pretty good reason to have a meter.

    Good luck and welcome!
     
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  8. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Really sorry to say this but you are not diet controlled. Your HbA1c puts you borderline pre diabetes - type 2 diabetes.

    Most of the foods you list are high carb and will do your blood glucose levels no favours. I advise that you buy a glucometer so that you can learn which foods you can tolerate in terms of the amount of carbs in them.
    Your funny turn is not likely to have been a false hypo as this is due to a change in carbohydrate amounts ingested. I suggest you see your GP about the dizzy, sweating turn you experienced.
    If you have more questions then do not hesitate at all, we were all once in your position.
     
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  9. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Hi and welcome,

    I 100% agree with all the others - you need a meter and you need to test. Testing before and after meals tells you at a glance what that food has done to you, and you will be in for many shocks along the way. (Your butties and weetabix most likely will have to be off your menu when you start to test as they are very high carb and will cause your blood sugar levels to rise)

    Your funny turn may well be your heart issues as you said. It could be a false hypo, but unlikely unless you have drastically reduced your carbohydrate intake (and weetabix and butties suggest you haven't), it could equally have been high glucose levels as the symptoms are very similar. If it keeps happening, maybe its time to see your doctor .... but is definitely time to buy a meter. If it was high glucose (like a big sugar rush) then you need to know, and if it was genuinely a hypo of some description, you also need to know. Any meds you take for your heart issues may not be helping with glucose levels depending what they are.

    Have a good read round, and ask as many questions as you like.
     
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  10. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @StephLightfoot believe it or not, you old breakfast of sausage ( 95% meat content) and egg is far better for your blood sugars than weetabix
     
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  11. StephLightfoot

    StephLightfoot Type 2 · Newbie

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    Don't be sorry Guzzler pre diabetes sounds much better to me. Thanks everyone for your help i have got to say that i did think omg what next when i was told i had t2 diabetes. I have had heart issues since a child but in the last 3 years ive had a heart attack and a stroke i was 46 in December, and at times i feel like an old lady tired and breathless all the time. A huge thank you to everyone who has answered my post. Things don't seem so scary now.
    I will get a monitor ASAP xxx
     
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  12. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    You'll be fine but that diet needs a change or two ... and a lot of water. As others have said, a doctor that suggests you don't test is an utter fool
     
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  13. Frank357

    Frank357 · Member

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    To be fair, it was the nurse who made the "snapshot" remark (and she who told me that it was dangerous for diabetics to prick their selves). The doctor was OK and is prescribing test strips for me.

    But you are right that the NHS seems to have a very conservative attitude to diabetes, particularly on the issue of diet.
     
  14. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    Obviously your nurse did not give you any guidance about diet - which is typical I'm afraid.
    Reducing your intake of carbs is probably going to be the most important thing to do - drink plenty of water, also keep up your intake of vitamins and minerals and if you reduce processed food increase your salt intake, as you could develop cramps due to the lowered intake of salt.
    You probably have been instructed to keep your fat intake down and that will reduce your cholesterol - which doctors believe is responsible for problems with the heart and vascular system - though there does seem to be more evidence that carbohydrates are the more likely culprits. Do eat what fats are regarded as healthy for you, as although there are no essential carbs there are essential fatty acids, and some people can feel really ill without them.
     
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  15. StephLightfoot

    StephLightfoot Type 2 · Newbie

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    The nurse i seen said to eat tinned soup and tinned spaghett at lunch times which i found odd. I think if i eat regular meals and watch my carb in take i will be good. What about alcohol i do like a few beers when watching the Liverpool games. x
     
  16. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    Tinned soup and spaghetti? No .. absolute no ....

    Beers? Low carb variety
     
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  17. Mark_1

    Mark_1 · Well-Known Member

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    A TEE meter is free I’d start by getting one of those and look into a low carb healthy fats diet. Add up the number of carbs in what your eating and use the meter to check how they effect you. Best low carb beer I’ve found is marstons resolution you will probably need to order it online as it’s not readily available in the shops.
     
  18. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Some people can get away with a cheeky beer or two, the only way to know for sure is to test. Red wine would be a better choice and it would match the Liverpool strip :)
     
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  19. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I would actually expect wholemeal bread and weetabix to give me a pretty good glucose spike and crash...
     
  20. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    As to the nurse's comment about tinned food, she may be concerned more about portion control than the quality of the foods in the tins. An awful lot of processed foods are jam packed with added sugar as well as carbs. My Diabetes nurse advised me to eat microwavable rice! I stopped her in her tracks at that point.
     
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